Illegal Sea Sand Dredging Leaves Behind Environmental Mess, China

Posted In News, Sand Mining
Dec
8

sand-barges
Sand barge, Hong Kong. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

The city of Qingdao in Shandong Province is known for its sandy beaches, wild beer festival and its unique architecture. But recent visitors might have noticed something else: ugly dredging vessels pumping sea sand to be used for construction projects.

Boats deliver the sand to construction sites including airports, highways and homes…

Read Full Article, Global Times China

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