Mining Black Sand, Lingayen, Philippines

Posted In News, Sand Mining
Feb
6

philippines-beach-sand-mining
Black sand beach, Philippines. Photo source: ©© Nathanael B

Excerpts;

Jaime Palisoc, 63, could only look in despair as his village’s scenic shoreline as he remembers as it was in his childhood, and now it is fast turning into a “wasteland.”

Palisoc, a member of Sabangan village’s council, said he was born and raised there and it was the first time that “strangers” came with their earth, or sand- moving equipment, to extract black sand, destroying the almost pristine beaches covered with native grasses and lined with pine trees and thorny plants they call “aromas.”

Trucks full of sand already devoid of magnetite pass through the newly-constructed dusty road every ten minutes or so, coming from adjoining Malimpuec village where a “monstrous magnet” separates the mineral from the black sand.

The black sand of this village and three other coastal villages facing the Lingayen Gulf are being mined for magnetite, a highly-valuable mineral used by industrial companies.

The residents fear that without magnetite, the beaches would easily erode.

“… black sand is a natural defense of coastal areas from tsunamis and other sea-based disasters whether man-made or natural. Once removed, the beach appears to be like an open pit mining without capacity to counter water current or temper disturbing water currents that may result in tsunamis. Without magnetite, sand is easily washed away by big waves, and could result in communities easily washed away…”

The Lingayen Gulf is an extension of the South China Sea on Luzon in the Philippines stretching 56 km (35 mi). It is framed by the provinces of Pangasinan and La Union and sits between the Zambales Mountains and the Cordillera Central. The Agno River drains into Lingayen Gulf. Wikipedia

Read Full Original Article, Northern Watch

DENR Stops Lingayen Black Sand Mining, Philippines, Inquirer
The Environmental Management Bureau (EMB) has stopped black sand extraction in coastal villages in Lingayen, after it issued a cease-and-desist order to the firm contracted by the provincial government


Magnetite Beach Sand Mining Operation, Buguey, Cagayan, Philippines: A VIDEO

YouTube Preview Image

Uploaded by envieonment on Sep 15, 2011 / Youtube
Excerpts;
“View how the Backhoe haul our Blacksand along our coastline… Isn’t it that it is so very destructive as you can see… They are operating near the sea waves and destroying our natural protective barriers. They do that 24 hours 7 days a week. Imagine what will happen to us in Buguey, Cagayan if this mining companies continues with their operations…My dear townmates, we are now the caretakers of our environment. It is our duty and obligations to protect it and save what is left in our environment, not only our sake bet also for the future generations-for the sake of our childrens. Their operation is evidently within the prohibited zone as define under the Phil. Mining Act of 1995 that 200 meters onshore from the mean low tide and 500 meters offshore from the mean low tide from the coast are areas closed to mining…Likewise Batas Pambansa 265 prohibits the extraction of any beach resources… But look what they are doing? Remember the RULE OF LAW must prevail. Ignorance of the law excuses no one and no man is above the law…therefore the government should not tolerate any violations of the law… It is also our constitutional right to live in a healthy and balanced ecology…”

Learn more and See contact information:“Environment / Youtube

Sand mining operation-Minanga Este, Buguey, Cagayan. A Youtube Video
Barges use for operations of the Magnetite sand mining along the coast of Buguey, Cagayan, Philippines.

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