“We Were Once Three Miles From the Sea”

Posted In Erosion, Inform, Sea Level Rise
Jan
3

western-africa-coastal-erosion
Photo source: ©© Melanie Kotsopoulos

Excerpts;

Grain by grain, West Africa’s coasts are eroding away, the dry land sucked under the water by a destructive mix of natural erosion and human meddling…

Nyani Quarmyne has poignantly photographed the impacts of climate change on people living on the Ghana coast.

He shows us some of the people in the ruins of their houses, which many cannot leave as they have nowhere else to go. Quarmyne makes a point of telling us their names, Numour Puplampo and Vincent Tetteh Teye and others, and meets their eyes through his camera…

WATCH: Photo Gallery: Climate Change: “We Were Once Three Miles From the Sea,” by Nyani Quarmyne

Climate change threatens Ghana’s coast; Al Jazeera
Grain by grain, West Africa’s coasts are eroding away, the dry land sucked under the water by a destructive mix of natural erosion and human meddling…
From Senegal to Nigeria, scientists say eroding beaches will soon pose an unavoidable threat to booming coastal populations. A glimpse of that future can be seen here…

Learn More; Nyani Quarmyne: Climate Change: “We Were Once Three Miles From the Sea”
Images depicting the impacts of climate change on people living near Ada on the Ghana coast…

Art Exhibit,”We Were Once Three Miles From the Sea,” by Nyani Quarmyne; We Face Forward
Quarmyne began to make photographs in 2008 and since then has gained a strong reputation as a documentary photographer, working for many agencies and publications. In the way he works with his subjects over many months and his desire to tell us the whole story, Quarmyne’s work resonates with the Western traditions of documentary photography. His photographs, however, are of West African people with whom he has a cultural and social affinity and whose stories he himself is implicated in. He shows us some of the people in the ruins of their houses, which many cannot leave as they have nowhere else to go. Quarmyne makes a point of telling us their names, Numour Puplampo and Vincent Tetteh Teye and others, and meets their eyes through his camera…

Ghana’s Ongoing Battle Against Coastal erosion, (Uploaded 09-09-2011)

Battling Ghana’s Eroding Coastline, Office Upholds Navy’s Startegic & Humanitarian Focus, US Navy Currents Winter 2010 (Uploaded 12-13-2010)
For Ghana, the real story of coastal erosion is not about what lies at the water’s edge, but what occurs beneath the waves offshore. In the capital city of Accra, an estimated 70 percent of the beach is eroding at rates exceeding 3 feet per year…

ghana-coast
Ghana. Photo source: ©© Floris Van Halm

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