The Folly Of Poorly Executed Beach Renourishment

Posted In Beach Nourishment, Erosion, Inform
May
6

folly-beach
Folly beach, South Carolina. Photo source: ©© Reellady

Excerpts;

“Last month, I went surfing at the Folly Beach Washout with local surf legend Glenn Tanner. As we exited the waves and climbed over the massive dredging pipe feeding Folly’s latest sand replenishment project, Tanner counted the steps to reach the Washout’s contest shack. Shaking his head, he said, “The last time they did this in 2005, it took 102 steps at high tide. This time, it only took 51…”

Read Full Article, The Post And Courier

Army Corps Beach Erosion Fix Would Cost $43.4M, Miami Herald (04-16-2014)

Sand Shortage Leaves South Florida Beaches Vulnerable to Erosion, Tampa Bay Times (08-19-2013)

Coastal Erosion Sparks ‘Sand Wars’ In New England (12-21-2013)
Sand is becoming New England coastal dwellers’ most coveted and controversial commodity as they try to fortify beaches against rising seas and severe erosion caused by violent storms.

Waikiki Beach Eroding Less Than A Year After $2.2M Sand Restoration, Pacific Business News (Uploaded 01-24-2013)
A section of Hawaii’s famed Waikiki Beach is starting to erode, less than a year after the completion of a $2.2 million project to replenish the sand on about 1,730 feet of shoreline that had been suffering from chronic erosion.

Sand Moved To Cover Waikiki Beach Erosion Swept Away, Video, Hawaii News (11-25-2013)

Scientists Urge Shoreline Retreat From Hawaii’s Eroding Beaches

We Need to Retreat From the Beach, An Op Ed by Orrin H. Pilkey

Let’s Talk About Sand: Denis Delestrac At TEDxBarcelona
A video featuring Denis Delestrac, writer and award-winning director.
Denis Delestrac latest feature documentary, “Sand Wars” is an epic eco-thriller that takes the audience around the globe to unveil a new gold rush and a disturbing fact: we are running out of sand! In this TEDxBarcelona talk, he explains us where sand comes from and where it ends up…

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Coastal Care junior
The World's Beaches
Sand Mining
One Percent