Nature Confronts Politics in North Carolina

Posted In Inform, Sea Level Rise
May
26

coastal-flooding
Aerial pictures of North Carolina’s coast, after superstorm Sandy devastated the area. Photo courtesy of: © Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines (PSDS) / WCU

Excerpts;

As local politicians underestimate rising sea levels, coastal communities are coming up with their own plans…

Read Full Article, American Al Jazeera

That ‘More Realistic’ Sea-Level Report? Not Good News for NC, By Robert S. Young, Ph.D., professor of coastal geology at Western Carolina University; News Observer (05-06-2015)

The State That ‘Outlawed Climate Change’ Accepts Latest Sea-Level Rise Report, WUNC (05-05-2015)
Five years ago, the Science Panel of the North Carolina Coastal Resources Commissioner presented a report outlining that sea levels along the coast could rise as much as 39 inches over the next 100 years. The General Assembly passed a law forbidding communities from using this report to pass new rules. Now, almost three years later, the scientists have come back with a new report, but it is hardly complete and universal…

North Carolina Should Move With Nature on Coast, News Observer (01-05-2015)

Watching The Rising Tides Along North Carolina’s Coast, (11-15-2013)
Professor Robert Young, director of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines and a professor of coastal geology at Western Carolina University, with North Carolina Public Radio host Frank Stasio, discussing the consequences of climate change and how rising sea levels have a strong effect on the beaches of North Carolina…

Sea Level Rise Accelerating In U.S. Atlantic Coast, USGS (06-25-2012)

Denying Sea-Level Rise: How 100 Centimeters Divided The State of North Carolina, By Alexander Glass and Orrin Pilkey (04-23-2013)

“North Carolina: The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

We Need to Retreat From the Beach, An Op Ed by Orrin H. Pilkey

Tags:

Coastal Care junior
The World's Beaches
Sand Mining
One Percent