Are we loving our beaches to death? Survey says ‘yes’

Posted In Erosion, News, Sand Mining
Feb
5

new-zealand-1
New Zealand. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

A new survey has found almost two-thirds of New Zealanders believed beach erosion was worse than it was 20 years ago, and most were worried that some beaches might vanish forever.

In many cases, New Zealand’s beaches were paying the price for overwhelming public popularity.

“We’re loving our beaches to death. We’re driving on them, building sea walls that change beach dynamics and sand movement, developing beachfront property virtually right on top on them,”.

“We’re shaping and managing our beaches to fit what people want and expect from them, rather than understanding and working with natural processes that are best for healthy, resilient beaches.

“If we can work with nature, rather than against it, everyone benefits. It’s vitally important, because some beaches are already under enormous pressure and are at risk of disappearing…”

Read Full Article, Bay of Plenty Times (01-13-2017)

Coastal geologist criticizes beach renourishment efforts; By Robert S. Young, PhD; The State (08-17-2016)

Beach replenishment may have far reaching impacts on ecosystems;” Phys.Org (03-29-2016)

Piling sand to stop erosion ultimately made the land sink, study says, NOLA (12-26-2015)

“The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

Developers don’t get it: climate change means we need to retreat from the coast, Guardian UK (15-03-2016)

We Need to Retreat From the Beach, An Op Ed by Orrin H. Pilkey

“Seawalls Kill Beaches,” Open Letters by Warner Chabot And Rob Young; (10-03-2014)

Living shorelines a more natural approach to preventing coastal erosion; WNCT (05-18-2016)
For centuries, large bulkheads have been used to help control erosion along coastlines. More recent research suggests that a natural approach may be a better alternative. Having nature on your side, especially during a storm or hurricane, is proven to provide better protection from coastal erosion…

“Living Shorelines” Will Get Fast Track to Combat Sea Level Rise; Scientific American (07-06-2016)

Rethinking Living Shorelines, By Orrin H. Pilkey, Rob Young, Norma Longo, and Andy Coburn;Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines / Western Carolina University, March 1, 2012, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University
In response to the detrimental environmental impacts caused by traditional erosion control structures, environmental groups, state and federal resource management agencies, now advocate an approach known as “Living Shorelines”that embraces the use of natural habitat elements such as indigenous vegetation, to stabilize and protect eroding shorelines.

NOAA Study Finds Marshes, Reefs, Beaches Can Enhance Coastal Resilience, NOAA (04-29-2015)

The Conservation Crisis No One Is Talking About, TakePart (09-21-2016)
Beaches around the world are disappearing. No, the cause isn’t sea-level rise, at least not this time. It’s a little-known but enormous industry called sand mining, which every year sucks up billions of tons of sand from beaches, ocean floors, and rivers to make everything from concrete to microchips to toothpaste…

Company makes new iron sand mining attempt; Radio NZ (08-24-2016)

Sand, Rarer Than One Thinks: A UNEP report (GEA-March 2014)
Despite the colossal quantities of sand and gravel being used, our increasing dependence on them and the significant impact that their extraction has on the environment, this issue has been mostly ignored by policy makers and remains largely unknown by the general public.
In March 2014 The United Nations released its first Report about sand mining. “Sand Wars” film documentary by Denis Delestrac – first broadcasted on the european Arte Channel, May 28th, 2013, where it became the highest rated documentary for 2013 – expressly inspired the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to publish this 2014-Global Environmental Alert.

Sand Wars, An Investigation Documentary, By Mutlti-Awards Winner Filmmaker Denis Delestrac (©-2013)

Global Sand Mining: Learn More, Coastal Care

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