Duncan’s Bay Residents Still Livid Despite OPM’s Defence Of Sand-Mining Approval, Jamaica

Posted In News, Sand Mining
Jul
19

beach-sand-mining
Beach sand mining, Caribbean. Photograph: © SAF – Coastal Care

Excerpts;

Residents of Duncan’s Bay in Trelawny remain upset over the recent decision by Prime Minister Andrew Holness to grant an environmental permit for mining and quarrying beach sand in their community…

Read Full Article, Jamaica Gleaner (07-08-2017)

Officials Says Duncans Bay Sand-Mining Operation Legal, Jamaica Observer (01-27-2014)

Large beach sand mining operation in Trelawny, Jamaica, Jamaica Observer (01-21-2014)

Why moving beach sand from Negril matters; By Diana McCaulay is CEO of the Jamaica Environment Trust, Jamaica Observer
Jamaica is suffering from beach erosion in many places because we have damaged the natural features and processes that build and maintain beaches. When you remove sand from one area of the coastline to the next, you reduce the sand budget in the source area…

Negril Chamber Outraged Over Sand-Mining Operations, Jamaica, (01-16-2016)
The Negril Chamber of Commerce has expressed outrage at what it says appears to be shady sand mining activities connected to major hotel developments in Negril and elsewhere on the North Coast…

Sand, Rarer Than One Thinks: A UNEP report (GEA-March 2014)
Despite the colossal quantities of sand and gravel being used, our increasing dependence on them and the significant impact that their extraction has on the environment, this issue has been mostly ignored by policy makers and remains largely unknown by the general public.
In March 2014 The United Nations released its first Report about sand mining. “Sand Wars” film documentary by Denis Delestrac – first broadcasted on the european Arte Channel, May 28th, 2013, where it became the highest rated documentary for 2013 – expressly inspired the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to publish this 2014-Global Environmental Alert.

The Conservation Crisis No One Is Talking About, TakePart (09-21-2016)
Beaches around the world are disappearing. No, the cause isn’t sea-level rise, at least not this time. It’s a little-known but enormous industry called sand mining, which every year sucks up billions of tons of sand from beaches, ocean floors, and rivers to make everything from concrete to microchips to toothpaste…

The Economist explains: Why there is a shortage of sand; The Economist (04-24-2017)

Sand Is in Such High Demand, People Are Stealing Tons of It, By Dave Roos; HowStuffWorks (03-06-2017)
As strange as it may sound, sand is one of the world’s hottest commodities. The global construction boom has created an insatiable appetite for sand, the chief ingredient for making concrete. The problem is that sand isn’t as abundant as it used to be. And when high demand and high value meets scarcity, you open the doors to smuggling…

Sand Thieves Are Eroding World’s Beaches For Castles Of Cash, by Martine Valo, Le Monde (09-2013)
The pillaging of sand is a growing practice in the world. This is because it represents 80% of the composition of concrete that it is the object of such greed…

Sand Wars, An Investigation Documentary, By Multi Award-Winning Filmmaker Denis Delestrac (©-2013)

Sand Mining in Jamaica: Learn More, Coastal Care

Global Sand Mining: Learn More, Coastal Care

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