Trucking Mud to the Beaches Means More Sand but Dirtier Waters, CA

Posted In News, Pollution
Feb
9


Goleta beach, January 16, 2018. Santa Barbara County Flood Control District obtained emergency permits from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, California Regional Water Quality Control Board, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the California Coastal Commission to place sediment on local beaches. Current permits allow up to 300,000 cubic yards of sediment to be placed into the surf zone. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care.

Excerpts;

When Santa Barbara County dumps tons of mud from the catastrophic debris flow of January 9 on the shores of Goleta and Carpinteria, is that “beach nourishment”?

This isn’t like anything that’s happened before. So Goleta residents are asking, Will there be long-term effects? Might there be other locations that can share the impacts..?”

Read Full Article; Santa Barbara Independent (02-08-2018)

Montecito Cleanup Efforts Require Transport of Mud to Santa Barbara County Beaches, Noozhawk (01-12-2018)
The Santa Barbara County Flood Control District obtained emergency permits from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the California Coastal Commission to place sediment on local beaches…

As Montecito cleanup continues, a search for where to dump thousands of tons of mud; LA Times (01-11-2018)

Goleta Beach, California; By Claire Le Guern (07-01-2010)

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The World's Beaches
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