Marine mammals most at risk from increased Arctic ship traffic


A pod of narwhals from northern Canada. Captions and Photo source: ©© Kristin Laidre / NOAA

Excerpts;

In recent decades parts of the Arctic seas have become increasingly ice-free in late summer and early fall. As sea ice is expected to continue to recede due to climate change, seasonal ship traffic from tourism and freight is projected to rise.

A study from the University of Washington and the University of Alaska Fairbanks is the first to consider potential impacts on the marine mammals that use this region during fall and identify which will be most vulnerable…

Read Full Article; Science Daily (07-02-2018)

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