Sierra Leone: Beaches under attack from sand miners

Posted In News, Sand Mining
Oct
23


Illegal beach sand mining. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care.
In Sierra Leone, sand mining and work in tourism are now more lucrative than fishing. Captions source: IRIN

Excerpts;

Beaches along Lakka, Tokeh, Lumley and Aberdeen, amongst others, face challenges from climate change to damaging human activities, including sand mining. Twenty-four hours a day, seven-days-a-week, truckloads of sand are being hauled from the beach into Freetown to satisfy the needs of construction companies and contractors.

Hundreds of tonnes of sand from the beaches is mined and sold to builders as construction material. The activity is technically illegal but laws, as is often the case, are not being implemented or enforced…

Read Full Article; Awoko (10-18-2018)

Sand mining will continue to relocate families in Sierra Leone, By Ishmael Kindama Dumbuya, Standard Times Press Sierra Leone (06-26-2013)

Jobless Youths Revert to Beach Sand Mining, John Obey Beach, Sierra Leone; MySierraLeoneOnline (06-26-2013)

In Pictures: Beach Sand Mining in Sierra Leone, BBC News (01-10-2013)

Sand-Mining Threatens Homes And Livelihoods In Sierra Leone, IRIN (02-27-2013)
Round-the-clock sand-mining on beaches within a few kilometres of Sierra Leone’s capital Freetown is having a devastating effect on the coastline, destroying property, and damaging the area’s hopes of a tourism revival…

How illegal sand mining in Sierra Leone is destroying the local beaches, The Ecologist (04-03-2013)

Sand mining decimates African beaches, DW (02-15-2017)

The Market For African Beach Sand: Who’s Buying, Selling And Mining It? AFK Insider (02-17-2017)

Sand, Rarer Than One Thinks: A UNEP report (GEA-March 2014)
Despite the colossal quantities of sand and gravel being used, our increasing dependence on them and the significant impact that their extraction has on the environment, this issue has been mostly ignored by policy makers and remains largely unknown by the general public.
In March 2014 The United Nations released its first Report about sand mining. “Sand Wars” film documentary by Denis Delestrac – first broadcasted on the european Arte Channel, May 28th, 2013, where it became the highest rated documentary for 2013 – expressly inspired the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to publish this 2014-Global Environmental Alert.

The Conservation Crisis No One Is Talking About, TakePart (09-21-2016)
Beaches around the world are disappearing. No, the cause isn’t sea-level rise, at least not this time. It’s a little-known but enormous industry called sand mining, which every year sucks up billions of tons of sand from beaches, ocean floors, and rivers to make everything from concrete to microchips to toothpaste…

Sand Wars, An Investigation Documentary, By Award-Winning Filmmaker Denis Delestrac (©-2013)
Is sand an infinite resource? Can the existing supply satisfy a gigantic demand fueled by construction booms? What are the consequences of intensive beach sand mining for the environment and the neighboring populations…? This investigative documentary takes us around the globe to unveil a new gold rush and a disturbing fact: the “Sand Wars” have begun…

Sand Mining in Sierra Leone: Learn More, Coastal Care

Global Sand Mining: Learn More, Coastal Care


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PETITION: Take Action To End Global Beach Sand Mining, Coastal Care

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Illegal beach sand mining, near Tangier, Morocco. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

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