UN climate change conference and the world security

storm chief
“Storm Chief.” Photograph by: ©© Jennifer Daylight

Excerpts; by Ambassador Marlene Moses, Nauru’s Permanent Representative to the UN

“On Wednesday, the United Nations Security Council concluded its open debate with a Presidential Statement that formally recognized the link between climate change and the maintenance of international peace and security…

Read Full Article, Huffington Post

UN Original Statement, July 20th 2010
The Security Council this afternoon expressed concern that the possible adverse effects of climate change could, in the long-run, aggravate certain existing threats to international peace and security and that the loss of territory in some States due to sea-level rise, particularly in small low-lying island States, could have possible security implications. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who opened the Council debate, pointed to the devastating impact of extreme weather and rising seas on lives, infrastructure and budgets — an “unholy brew” that could create dangerous security vacuums. “We must make no mistake,” he said. “The facts are clear: climate change is real and accelerating in a dangerous manner,” he said, declaring that it “not only exacerbates threats to international peace and security; it is a threat to international peace and security”.

UN says climate change threatens world security, AFP

U.N. Deadlock on Addressing Climate Shift, The New York Times

The Rising Sea

A Book by Orrin H. Pilkey and Rob Young



Published by Island Press

On Shishmaref Island in Alaska, homes are being washed into the sea. In the South Pacific, small island nations face annihilation by encroaching waters. In coastal Louisiana, an area the size of a football field disappears every day. For these communities, sea level rise isn’t a distant, abstract fear: it’s happening now and it’s threatening their way of life.

In The Rising Sea, Orrin H. Pilkey and Rob Young warn that many other coastal areas may be close behind. Prominent scientists predict that the oceans may rise by as much as seven feet in the next hundred years. That means coastal cities will be forced to construct dikes and seawalls or to move buildings, roads, pipelines, and railroads to avert inundation and destruction.

The question is no longer whether climate change is causing the oceans to swell, but by how much and how quickly. Pilkey and Young deftly guide readers through the science, explaining the facts and debunking the claims of industry-sponsored “skeptics.” They also explore the consequences for fish, wildlife—and people.

While rising seas are now inevitable, we are far from helpless. By making hard choices—including uprooting citizens, changing where and how we build, and developing a coordinated national response—we can save property, and ultimately lives. With unassailable research and practical insights, The Rising Sea is a critical first step in understanding the threat and keeping our heads above water.

About The Authors

Orrin H. Pilkey is James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of Geology at the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University. He authored and edited many books, including, most recently, “Global Climate Change: A Primer” and “The World’s Beaches: A Global Guide To The Science Of The Shoreline”

Rob Young is the director of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines and professor of geosciences at Western Carolina University.

Japan’s Hamaoka Atomic Plant to Build Huge Seawall

mark edward harris japan tsunami
Photograph courtesy © by Mark Edward Harris

Excerpts; AFP

Chubu Electric said Friday it will build an 18-metre (60 foot) anti-tsunami seawall to (attempt to )protect its aging Hamaoka nuclear plant located near a faultline in a region seen as vulnerable to earthquakes…

Read Full Article, AFP

Seawalls in Japan Offered Little Protection Against Tsunami’s Crushing Waves, The New York Times

Japan’s tsunami waves did top historic heights

Tsunami Warnings, Written In Stone, The New York Times

Hamaoka Nuclear Plant, Wikipedia
The Hamaoka Nuclear Power Plant is located in Omaezaki city, Shizuoka Prefecture, on Japan’s east coast, 200 km south-west of Tokyo. Hamaoka is built directly over the subduction zone near the junction of two tectonic plates, and a major Tokai earthquake is said to be overdue. The Tokai earthquakes are major earthquakes that have occurred regularly with an interval of 100 to 150 years in the Tōkai region of Japan.

Japan’s tsunami waves, NASA

Huge Ice Island Near Labrador ‘s Coast

ice-island-labrador-coast
Huge ice island off Labrador’coast. Image source: NASA, Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. Caption by Michael Carlowicz.

By Michael Carlowicz, NASA

Nearly 11 months after calving off of the northwestern coast of Greenland, a massive ice island is now caught up in ocean currents off the coast of Labrador, Canada.

The ice island, known as “Petermann Ice Island” was formed when a 251-square-kilometer (97-square-mile) chunk of ice broke off the Petermann Glacier on August 5, 2010. The Canadian Ice Service has since been tracking the ice island, dubbed PII-A, via satellite and radio beacon.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this natural-color image of the ice island on June 25, 2011. The northeast-facing coast of Labrador is mostly obscured by thin, wispy clouds, as it has been for much of the past week.

News agencies reported that the ice island stretched roughly 62 square kilometers in area and weighed between 3.5 and 4 billion tons.

The island has been slowly breaking up and melting on its journey—nearly 30 degrees of latitude, or more than 3,000 kilometers—but it could eventually pose a hazard to shipping lanes off Newfoundland.

Canadian fishermen captured this close-up video of the ice island.

WATCH: Ice Island Off labrador’s Coast, Close-up Video, “Petermann Ice Island video.”

Original Article

Huge ice island near Labrador ‘blew’ scientist’s mind
A huge island of ice the size of Manhattan is drifting off the coast of Labrador, and it’s a glacial event that has scientists around the world abuzz.”It blew my mind at how big it was,” said Sara Weikamp, a marine science technician with the U.S. Coast Guard.

Reaching The Gap Between Scientists And Policy Makers

meso-reef-shores-mexico
Garbage comes in from the ocean and collects on these otherwise pristine and remote beaches in the Sian Ka’an Biosphere Reserve in Quintana Roo, Mexico. It is likely that much of it comes from cruise ships dumping garbage in international waters just off shore. These are turtle nesting beaches. The Mesoamerican Barrier Reef runs along this coast and is also impacted by the garbage. Caption and photo source: ©©Sarah 10002

Excerpts;

On July 18th, Dr. Sylvia Earle, world-renowned oceanographer and 2009 TED Prize Winner, joined a team of scientists, government officials and award-winning photojournalists on a week-long expedition “the Mission Blue expedition” to the Swan Islands and Mesoamerican Reef…

WATCH:
Legendary ocean researcher Sylvia Earle shares astonishing images of the ocean, and shocking stats about its rapid decline, as she makes her TED Prize wish: that we will join her in protecting the vital blue heart of the planet.

Read Full Article, Sealliance, Doctor Sylvia Earle<

Plastic Pollution And Marine Environment, Coastal Care

Rising Oceans: Too Late to Turn the Tide?

sea level rise
Photo source: ©©PinPix

Excerpts;

As the world’s climate becomes warmer due to increased greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, sea levels are expected to rise by up to three feet by the end of this century.

But the question remains: How much of that will be due to ice sheets melting as opposed to the oceans’ 332 billion cubic miles of water increasing in volume as they warm up?

Read Full Article, Science Daily

The World’s Beaches : A Global Guide to the Science of the Shoreline

A book by Orrin H. Pilkey, William J. Neal, James Andrew Graham Cooper and Joseph T. Kelley


Published by University Of California Press

” Beaches are the most dynamic features on Earth, constantly changing shape and providing vital ecological functions and a home to environments of amazing biodiversity. Understanding the importance of the beach’s role vis-a-vis the land, the nearshore and the ocean and its biodiversity is crucial to its protection and preservation.”
—Santa Aguila Foundation

” We, the authors of this book, often think we are the luckiest people in the world. We have walked on and looked at beaches all over the world, on all seven continents. With our feets and eyes we study one of the world’s most dynamic natural environments. Best of all, the work is part of our job: we study the present as geologists in order to understand the past, and as educators to pass on our global experience to students”
– Orrin H. Pilkey, William J. Neal, James Andrew Graham Cooper and Joseph T. Kelley.

Orrin H. Pilkey is James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of Geology at the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University, and Founder and Director Emeritus of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, based at Western Carolina University.

William J. Neal , is Professor Emeritus of Geology, Department of Geology, at Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI.

James Andrew Graham Cooper, PhD, is Professor of Coastal Studies, at the University of Ulster.

Joseph T. Kelley is Professor of Geology and Oceanography, at Lehigh University.

Pre-order available now on Amazon.com


REVIEWS


“Take this book to the beach; it will open up a whole new world…
Illustrated throughout with color photographs, maps, and graphics,”The World’s Beaches” explores one of the planet’s most dynamic environments, from tourist beaches to Arctic beaches strewn with ice chunks to steaming hot tropical shores…This fascinating, comprehensive guide also considers the future of beaches, and explains how extensively people have affected them, from coastal engineering to pollution, oil spills, and rising sea levels.” Guardian, Culture, Book Review.


“The World’s Beaches: A Global Guide to the Science of the Shoreline,” By Orrin H. Pilkey, William J. Neal, James Andrew Graham Cooper and Joseph T. Kelley.
Best Sellers: Geology, March 1, 2012.
Library Journals list of Best Sellers in Geology, Book Review.


“The World’s Beaches: A Global Guide to the Science of the Shoreline,” a comprehensive, readable guide to the physical features of many kinds of beaches and some of the threats they face.” The New York Times


The World’s Beaches, A Global Guide to the Science of the Shoreline, by Orrin H. Pilkey, William J. Neal, Joseph T. Kelley, and J. Andrew G. Cooper.
Illustrated throughout with color photographs, maps, and graphics, The World’s Beaches tells how beaches work, explains why they vary so much, and shows how dramatic changes can occur on them in a matter of hours – from tourist beaches to Arctic beaches strewn with ice chunks to steaming hot tropical shores. This fascinating, comprehensive guide also considers the future of beaches, and explains how extensively people have affected them. Patagonia


The authors of “The World’s Beaches: A Global Guide to the Science of the Shoreline,” explain what kinds of changes late-season beachgoers can expect in the wake of Hurricane-turned-Tropical-Storm Irene. Metro Focus


Made possible by the Santa Aguila Foundation (a non-profit dedicated to coastline preservation around the world), “The World’s Beaches: A Global Guide to the Science of the Shoreline,” has wide appeal. The aim is not to dazzle, but to inform, and in this way encourage preservation efforts worldwide. Written in an engaging style, the text covers classifications of beaches; the action of waves, currents, and tides; and how to “read” a beach through a close look at surfaces, wind action, beach creatures, and shells. Review, Reference & Research Book News / SCITECH Book News, October Issue


The World’s Beaches: A Global Guide to the Science of the Shoreline,” EARTH Magazine, December 1, 2011, Kathryn Hansen, Included in a holiday roundup of the editors’ favorite books from 2011..Earth Magazine


When will we ever learn the lessons of hurricanes? A Special to CNN.
“Orrin Pilkey is the James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of Earth Science at Duke University. His latest co-authored books are “Global Climate Change: A Primer” (Duke) and “The World’s Beaches” (University of California Press).” CNN


The World’s Beaches: A Global Guide to the Science of the Shoreline (2011),” written by Orrin Pilkey and three fellow scientists from around the world — William J. Neal, James Andrew Graham Cooper and Joseph T. Kelley — is a comprehensive but relatable guide to the science of the shoreline, teaching readers precisely how beaches work and how to read the “character” of any given shoreline…
Dr. Pilkey, professor emeritus of Geology and of Earth and Ocean Sciences at Duke University, is unusual in his willingness to advocate for changes in policies that affect the environment. “Scientists, in my view, have a responsibility to spread the word,” he told Kirkus. While the book may appear academic to the everyday reader, Pilkey warns that beaches remain one of the best indicators of things to come with global warming.
“Part of the purpose of The World’s Beaches is to get people to love and appreciate beaches on a different level. They are the most dynamic geomorphic feature on the surface of the Earth.”— Clayton Moore, The Kirkus Review


Pre-order available now on Amazon.com

Global Climate Change: A Primer

A Book by Orrin H. Pilkey and Keith C. Pilkey, Illustrated with batik art by Mary Edna Fraser



Published by Duke University Press

This timely, informative book is exactly what the public needs to understand the ongoing disruption of the earth’s climate. Orrin H. and Keith C. Pilkey present an excellent summary of what we know, and what we don’t know, about the planet’s climate. They also provide a superb overview of a huge campaign underwritten by corporate dollars and intended to confuse the public and manufacture doubt about climate issues.”
Brent Blackwelder, President Emeritus, Friends of the Earth.

An internationally recognized expert on the geology of barrier islands, Orrin H. Pilkey is one of the rare academics who engages in public advocacy about science-related issues. He has written dozens of books and articles explaining coastal processes to lay readers, and he is a frequent and outspoken interviewee in the mainstream media. Here, the colorful scientist takes on climate change deniers in an outstanding and much-needed primer on the science of global change and its effects.

After explaining the greenhouse effect, Pilkey, writing with son Keith C. Pilkey, turns to the damage it is causing: sea level rise, ocean acidification, glacier and sea ice melting, changing habitats, desertification, and the threats to animals, humans, coral reefs, marshes, and mangroves. These explanations are accompanied by Mary Edna Fraser’s stunning batiks depicting the large-scale arenas in which climate change plays out.

The Pilkeys directly confront and rebut arguments typically advanced by global change deniers. Particularly valuable are their discussions of “Climategate,” a manufactured scandal that undermined respect for the scientific community, and the denial campaigns by the fossil fuel industry, which they compare to the tactics used by the tobacco companies a generation ago to obfuscate findings on the harm caused by cigarettes.

About The Authors And Illustrator:

Orrin H. Pilkey is James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of Geology at the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University, and Founder and Director Emeritus of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, based at Western Carolina University.

Pilkey has written and edited many books, including, most recently, (with Rob Young) The Rising Sea and (with Linda Pilkey-Jarvis) Useless Arithmetic, an indictment of mathematical models used to predict environmental change.

He is the author or co-author of many books in the Living with the Shore book series that he co-edited for Duke University Press.

Pilkey is the recipient of numerous honors, including the Francis Shepard Medal for excellence in Marine Geology, the Priestley Award for distinguished contributions to environmental science, a Lifetime Achievement Award from the North Carolina Coastal Federation, and the Outstanding Public Service Award from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Pilkey lives in Hillsborough, North Carolina.

Pilkey’s son, Keith C. Pilkey, is an attorney with a longstanding interest in geoengineering and corporate influence on science policy. He lives in Johnson City, Tennessee.

Orrin and Keith Pilkey
Orrin H. Pilkey and Keith C. Pilkey. ©SAF

Mary Edna Fraser is an artist who highlights environmental concerns in large silk batiks, which are often based on maps, satellite images, and the photographs that she takes while flying her family’s 1946 propeller plane.

Deemed a “pilot with a palette” by Michael Kilian of the Chicago Tribune, Fraser has exhibited widely, including at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. Reviewing that show, Hank Burchard of the Washington Post declared that “the batiks amount to visual poetry.”

Fraser and Orrin H. Pilkey are the co-authors of A Celebration of the World’s Barrier Islands. She lives in Charleston, South Carolina.

“An internationally recognized expert on the geology of barrier islands, Orrin H. Pilkey is one of the rare academics who engages in public advocacy about science-related issues. After explaining the greenhouse effect, Pilkey, writing with son Keith, turns to the damage it is causing: sea level rise, ocean acidification, glacier and sea ice melting, changing habitats, desertification, and the threats to animals, humans, coral reefs, marshes, and mangroves. These explanations are accompanied by Mary Edna Fraser’s stunning batiks depicting the large-scale arenas in which climate change plays out.The Pilkeys directly confront and rebut arguments typically advanced by global change deniers. Particularly valuable are their discussions of “Climategate,” a manufactured scandal that undermined respect for the scientific community, and the denial campaigns by the fossil fuel industry…”
Book Review, By Alyce at Athomewithbooks.

“Dr. Orrin Pilkey, professor emeritus of Geology and of Earth and Ocean Sciences at Duke University, is unusual in his willingness to advocate for changes in policies that affect the environment. “Scientists, in my view, have a responsibility to spread the word,” he told Kirkus. “Part of the problem is that we scientists tend to be dullards when it comes to selling our case. Those who work in science tend to be very unsuited for spreading the word—that’s why they’re scientists. But although we should have opinions about policy, scientists should not determine policy per se, but should provide the basis for policy decisions.” Pilkey warns that beaches remain one of the best indicators of things to come with global warming. “I believe that the first truly global crisis will be sea-level rise and the movement of beaches retreating into cities and other places requiring massive changes of one kind or another,” he says. “Understanding how shorelines work will be critical to our response to sea-level rise…” To the audience for Global Climate Change, Pilkey has a message, especially for those who remain burdened by doubt…
Book Review, By Clayton Moore, The Kirkus Review

The mission of the Santa Aguila Foundation is to raise awareness of and mobilize people against the ongoing decimation of coastlines around the world.

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