Category Archives: Celebrate

100 years ago: Gorgeous colours on the pebble beach

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Pebble beach, Etretat, Normandy coast, France. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

“A child is the pure artist in collection. He needs no apology. The mere contemplating of his hoards, laying them out in array, counting and sorting, is amply enough joy for him. But we grown-ups are compelled to seek a plea of use, and, having found it, we may indulge our childishness…”

Read Full Article; Guardian UK (09-18-2016)

Sand Color Palette
Most beach sand color ranges from pale cream to golden to caramel, but in select places around the world, sand can be red, pink, orange, chocolate, gold, purple, green, or black…

A Grain of Sand – Nature’s Secret Wonder, A Book By Dr. Gary Greenberg
Every grain of sand is a jewel waiting to be discovered. That’s what Dr. Gary Greenberg found when he first turned his microscope on beach sand. Author and photographer Dr. Gary Greenberg is a visual artist who creatively combines art with science. Since 2001, Dr. Greenberg focuses his microscopes on common objects, such as grains of sand, flowers, and food. These everyday objects take on a new reality when magnified hundreds of times, revealing hidden and unexpected aspects of nature. Dr. Greenberg’s images of sand make us realize that as we walk along a beach we are strolling upon thousands of years of biological and geological history…

The Colors Of Beach Sand; By Gary Griggs

Watch Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano Spew Lava Into The Pacific Ocean

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Kilauea volcano lava flowing into the ocean. Photo source: ©© slworking2

Excerpts;

Thrill-seekers are flocking to the Hawaii coast, where lava is flowing from the Kilauea Volcano into the Pacific Ocean for the first time since 2013.

The lava stream spanned 6.5 miles when it reached the water on Tuesday morning…

Read Full Article And View Video, Huffington Green (07-29-2016)

Lava from Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano reaches Pacific Ocean; CNN (07-29-2016)

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Kilauea volcano lava ocean entry. Photo source: ©© Matthieu

Acadia National Park

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Acadia National Park. Photo source: ©© Jeff Gunn

By Mike Carlowicz, NASA / Earth Observatory;

It has had many different names: Pemetic. Isles des Monts Déserts. Sieur de Monts National Monument. Lafayette National Park.

It has had several superlatives: First national park east of the Mississippi River. Highest mountain along the U.S. East Coast. First place you can spot the sunrise in the United States.

It has been settled and re-settled by at least three different cultures—the Wabanaki, the French, the English—and drawn fishermen, farmers, artists, and the upper crust of late Victorian America—the Rockefellers, Morgans, Fords, Vanderbilts, Carnegies, and Astors.

Today, Acadia National Park is one of the most visited parks in America, drawing more than 2.5 million visitors per year to the craggy, jagged coast of Maine. The park is celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2016. On September 6, 2015, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat 8 satellite acquired these images of Acadia National Park and its surroundings.

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Mountains and hills roll right up to the Atlantic Ocean in this rocky landscape carved by glaciers at the end of the last Ice Age. Since the beginning of the 20th Century, the park has been pieced together by donations and acquisitions of once-private lands, and it is still growing. Of the park’s 47,000 acres, more than 12,000 are privately owned lands under conservation agreements, while the rest is held by the National Park Service. Mount Desert Island is the focal point of the park, which also includes lands around a former naval base (Schoodic Peninsula), Isle au Haut, and several smaller islands.

Mount Desert Island is the largest in Maine and the second largest on the East Coast. “It looks like a big lobster claw,” said Lynne Dominy, chief park ranger for interpretation at Acadia. “It’s both ironic and iconic, as we are surrounded by lobsters living in the Gulf of Maine.”

Writing in his journal after landing on the island in September 1604, Samuel de Champlain noted: “The mountain summits are all bare and rocky…I name it Isles des Monts Déserts” (French for “the island of barren mountains.”). Cadillac Mountain is the highlight, standing as the highest point (1,528 feet or 470 meters) within 25 miles (40 kilometers) of the Atlantic Ocean. Because its elevation and its far eastern location, it is claimed to be the first place an American can see the sunrise.

“Mount Desert is covered with forests, mountain summits, and freshwater lakes,” Dominy added. “This topography enables visitors to experience many wonderful things while visiting this island: walking on beautiful rocky shorelines; sailing offshore on boats; hiking on lush forest trails; climbing bald granite summits; and paddling on crystal clear lakes.”

Efforts to preserve Acadia began around 1901, led by conservationist George Dorr, who began cobbling together acquisitions and donations of land. Dorr and the Hancock County Trustees of Public Reservations turned over 6,000 acres to the U.S. government, with President Woodrow Wilson creating Sieur de Monts National Monument in 1916. In 1919, the parcels of the Maine coast were desginated Lafayette National Park in honor of the Marquis de Lafayette.

In 1929, the name was changed to Acadia, recalling the name of the original French colony in the region. Due to the public-private nature of the land holdings, it was not until 1986 that the U.S. Congress finally established official borders for the park. You can see the evolution of those land holding in the video at the bottom of this page.

Original Article, NASA / Earth Observatory (07-31-2016)

Southern Perspective: The value of our beach sand

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Pensacola Beach, Florida. Photo source: ©© Olin Gilbert

Excerpts;

The sand on the Emerald Coast is known worldwide for being the kind of white which is reflective and blinding under the blazing summer sun. That’s because it’s not even one percent shy of being pure quartz, which is incredibly rare in the world of sand.

The way I see it is that our beaches are made of tiny jewels, each grain precious and rare, no matter how much they may look alike…

Read Full Article, Pensacola News Journal (07-31-2016)

Where Are the Finest White-Sand Beaches in the World? Travel (06-21-2016)

Sand Color Palette
Most beach sand color ranges from pale cream to golden to caramel, but in select places around the world, sand can be red, pink, orange, chocolate, gold, purple, green, or black…

The Colors Of Beach Sand; By Gary Griggs

24 Unusual Beaches You Might Never Have Heard Of Before; WhenOnEarth (09-10-2015)
A singing beach, a glowing beach, a beach with rainbow-colored sand — here are the most offbeat seaside destinations you’ll find on Earth…

Scientist Finds ‘Hawaiian Beach’ Sand On Mars, Phys Org (10-28-2013)

Star Sand Beach In Iriomote Island, Japan; WhenOnEarth (02-23-2015)

A Grain of Sand – Nature’s Secret Wonder, A Book By Dr. Gary Greenberg
Every grain of sand is a jewel waiting to be discovered. That’s what Dr. Gary Greenberg found when he first turned his microscope on beach sand. Author and photographer Dr. Gary Greenberg is a visual artist who creatively combines art with science. Since 2001, Dr. Greenberg focuses his microscopes on common objects, such as grains of sand, flowers, and food. These everyday objects take on a new reality when magnified hundreds of times, revealing hidden and unexpected aspects of nature. Dr. Greenberg’s images of sand make us realize that as we walk along a beach we are strolling upon thousands of years of biological and geological history…

Sandbank On The Coast Of Whitsunday Island, Queensland, Australia; By Yann Arthus-Bertrand
Photo of the Month, January 2012; Photograph courtesy of Yann Arthus-Bertrand for Coastal Care.

Beach Color, Coastal Care

50 great Irish beaches

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Ballinskelligs Bay and Ballinskelligs Castle’s ruin, Kerry, Ireland.
The castle was constructed by the MacCarthy Mórs in the 16th century to protect the bay from pirates and to charge a tariff on incoming trade ships. These Tower houses were built all around the Cork and Kerry coasts by the McCarthy Mór family. Another larger example is Ballycarbery Castle in Cahirsiveen. Caption: The ring of Kerry. Photo source: ©© Michael Warren

Excerpts;

Whether you’re looking for family fun, seaside activities or a beach with cinematic associations, check out this round-up of some of the top spots…

Read Full Article, The Irish Times (07-28-2016)

Condé Nast’s 11 Best Beaches in France

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Etretat, Alabaster Coast, Normandy. The Alabaster Coast, has been named after its remarkable yet fragile dramatic looking clay cliffs. Since 2009 it has been classified as a Natura 2000 site. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

The first rule on finding the best beaches in France? Don’t assume they’re all on the Riviera. While the famed stretch of coastline does have some unforgettable beaches, you won’t want to discount the Normandy shore or the Bay of Biscay…

Read Full Article And View Photo Gallery, Condé Nast (07-27-2016)

The Great Painters And The Beach, Part 1: The European Masters, Claire Le Guern (10-21-2011)
The artful encounter of the Great Painters and the Beach is a love story, a celebration of life, a communion with eternity…
Since the early nineteenth century, Normandy’s beaches have attracted many artists, Édouard Manet and Claude Monet, gloriously painted the western coastal France, the beaches of Berck and Etretat. The clarity of the air, the quality of the light and amazing cliffs embracing the bay of Etretat, greatly inspired Monet…