Category Archives: Sandy Storm

Flood Insurance Costs May Soar For Hardest-Hit Sandy Victims

coastal-flooding
Aerial pictures of North Carolina’s coast, after superstorm Sandy devastated the area. Photo courtesy of: © Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines (PSDS) / WCU

Excerpts;

“George Kasimos has almost finished repairing flood damage to his waterfront home, but his Superstorm Sandy nightmare is far from over.

Like thousands of others in the hardest-hit coastal stretches of New Jersey and New York, his life is in limbo as he waits to see if tough new coastal rebuilding rules make it just too expensive for him to stay. Federal authorities have been issuing them a sobering warning: Raise your homes above the flood plain or face soaring flood insurance costs. For many, it’s an impossible choice.

They think Sandy was a fluke, a storm to end all storms, the kind they won’t ever see again. And they’re preparing to do battle with the government for the right to continue living just as they have for generations, in low-lying abodes that were never built to endure storms, let alone the fierce hurricanes of the 21st century…”

Read Full Article, Huffington Post

We Need to Retreat From the Beach, By Orrin Pilkey
As ocean waters warm, the Northeast is likely to face more Sandy-like storms. And as sea levels continue to rise, the surges of these future storms will be higher and even more deadly. We can’t stop these powerful storms. But we can reduce the deaths and damage they cause… An Op Ed by Orrin H. Pilkey.

Rebuilding the Coastline, But at What Cost?

post-sandy-nj
Aerial pictures of Mantoloking, New Jersey’s coast, after superstorm Sandy devastated the area. Photo courtesy of: © Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines (PSDS) / WCU

Excerpts;

Nearly seven months after Hurricane Sandy decimated the northeastern coastline, destroying houses and infrastructure and dumping 11 billion gallons of untreated and partially treated sewage into rivers, bays, canals and even some streets, coastal communities have been racing against the clock to prepare for Memorial Day.

“My fear is that the environmental damage from Hurricane Sandy is going to be long-term and will result more from our response than from the storm itself,” said Robert S. Young, head of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University…

Read Full Article, The New York Times

Dispute in Hamptons Set Off by Effort to Hold Back Ocean

Southampton-Village
Construction of a large rock revetment, certainly one of the largest structure in the entire US designed to protect only one house. Learn more

Excerpts;

Soon after Hurricane Sandy hit last fall, Joshua Harris, a billionaire hedge fund founder and an owner of the Philadelphia 76ers, began to fear that his $25 million home on the water here might fall victim to the next major storm. So he installed a costly defense against incoming waves: a shield of large metal plates on the beach, camouflaged by sand…

“If you build a structure like that, the beach is going to disappear,” Robert Young, a coastal geologist hired by the town of Southampton, told The New York Times. “The sea wall is not there to protect the beach. It is there to protect the property behind the beach.”

Read Full Article, New York Times

Hedge Fund Managers Build Walls Of Sand To Protect Hamptons Homes, FINalternatives

Post Sandy Coastal Engineering Atrocity at Village of Southampton, In Pictures

Rebuilding the Shores, Increasing the Risks

mantoloking-before-after-sandy
Oblique aerial photographs of Mantoloking, NJ. View looking west along the New Jersey shore. Storm waves and surge cut across the barrier island at Mantoloking, NJ, eroding a wide beach, destroying houses and roads, and depositing sand onto the island and into the back-bay. Construction crews with heavy machinery are seen clearing sand from roads and pushing sand seaward to build a wider beach and protective berm just days after the storm. The yellow arrow in each image points to the same feature. Captions and Photo source: USGS

Excerpts;

This might be a good time to take a look at the most important environmental law that nobody has ever heard of…

Read Full Article, The New York Times

Shoring Up the Nation’s Crumbling Coastlines
Hurricane Sandy pummeled the beaches of the Northeast, stripping away sand and dunes, and ploughing through seawalls. Can beaches be rebuilt to face fiercer storms and rising seas? And is there even enough sand to do it? Ira Flatow and guests discuss engineering the nation’s coasts for “the new normal.”

Sandy Reminds Us of Coastal Hazards, by Robert Young

Post Sandy: The Jersey Shore’s Susceptibility to Major Storms

post-sandy-seaside-nj
Seaside Heights and Seaside Park, NJ. Aerial pictures of New Jersey’s coast, after superstorm Sandy devastated the area. Photo courtesy of: © Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines (PSDS) / WCU

Excerpts;

Before Superstorm Sandy made landfall on the Jersey coast on Oct. 29, 2012, few realized the intensity of the storm that headed in their direction.

Could the inflicted damage to the coastline have been avoided with advance preparation? …

Original Article, Our Amazing Planet

We Need to Retreat From the Beach, by Orrin H. Pilkey
As ocean waters warm, the Northeast is likely to face more Sandy-like storms. And as sea levels continue to rise, the surges of these future storms will be higher and even more deadly. We can’t stop these powerful storms. But we can reduce the deaths and damage they cause… An Op Ed by Orrin H. Pilkey.

Hurricane Sandy Relief Bill Fails to Face Coastal Realities, by Robert S. Young,

Americans Back Preparation for Extreme Weather and Sea Level Rise, Standford University / Woods Institute For The Environment

Americans Back Preparation for Extreme Weather and Sea Level Rise

post-sandy-mantolooking
Mantoloking, NJ. Aerial pictures of New Jersey’s coast, after superstorm Sandy devastated the area. Photo courtesy of: © Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines (PSDS) / WCU

Excerpts;

Images told the story: lower Manhattan in darkness, coastal communities washed away, cars floating in muck. Superstorm Sandy, a harbinger of future extreme weather intensified by climate change, caught the U.S. off guard this past October. Unprepared for the flooding and high winds that ensued, the East Coast suffered more than $70 billion in property damages and more than 100 related deaths. Going forward, Americans face a stark choice: prepare and invest now to minimize the impact of disasters such as Sandy, or deal with storms and rising sea levels when they occur…

Read Full Article, Standford University / Woods Institute For The Environment

We Need to Retreat From the Beach, by Orrin H. Pilkey
As ocean waters warm, the Northeast is likely to face more Sandy-like storms. And as sea levels continue to rise, the surges of these future storms will be higher and even more deadly. We can’t stop these powerful storms. But we can reduce the deaths and damage they cause… An Op Ed by Orrin H. Pilkey.

Sandy Reminds Us of Coastal Hazards, by Robert Young
Hurricane Sandy will almost certainly join the pantheon of “costliest storms in history.”The impacts of the storm have been felt as far inland as Toronto, Ontario and coastal erosion and flooding affected beaches from South Carolina to southern Massachusetts…

How Arctic Ice May Have Influenced Superstorm Sandy

seaside-heights-before-after-sandy
Oblique aerial photographs of Seaside Heights, NJ. View looking west along the New Jersey shore. Storm waves and surge destroyed the dunes and boardwalk, and deposited the sand on the island, covering roads. The red arrow points to a building that was washed off of its foundation and moved about a block away from its original location. The yellow arrow in each image points to the same feature. Captions and Photo source: USGS

Excerpts;

The sea ice covering the Arctic Ocean may not seem to be connected to a hurricane like Superstorm Sandy, but a group of scientists is suggesting the record lack of ice last summer could have set up the atmospheric pattern that sent Sandy barreling into the Northeast.

The potential link is just one of many ways that human activities can, and in some cases already seem to be affecting Earth’s weather and driving it toward extremes, be they droughts, megafloods or superstorms like Sandy…

Read Full Article, Our Amazing Planet

Coastal Change Hazards: Hurricanes and Extreme Storms, Pre- and Post-Storm Photo Comparisons – New Jersey, USGS

mantoloking-before-after-sandy
Oblique aerial photographs of Mantoloking, NJ. View looking west along the New Jersey shore. Storm waves and surge cut across the barrier island at Mantoloking, NJ, eroding a wide beach, destroying houses and roads, and depositing sand onto the island and into the back-bay. Construction crews with heavy machinery are seen clearing sand from roads and pushing sand seaward to build a wider beach and protective berm just days after the storm. The yellow arrow in each image points to the same feature. Captions and Photo source: USGS