Category Archives: Beach Nourishment

In Miami, Worries About Cuba Include Grains of Sand (!)

sand-dredging-miami
On-board a sand dredger, offshore Miami. Photo courtesy of: “Sand Wars” Award-Winning Filmmaker: © Denis Delestrac (2013).

Excerpts;

For some, concerns over the tourism threat Cuba poses to Miami have reached the granular level…

Read Full Article, Miami Herald

Where Sand Is Gold, the Reserves Are Running Dry, The New York Times (08-26-2013)

“Sand Wars,” An Investigation Documentary, By Denis Delestrac
Based on encounters with sand smugglers, barefoot millionaires, corrupt politicians, unscrupulous real estate developers and environmentalists, this investigation takes us around the globe to unveil a new gold rush and a disturbing fact: the “Sand Wars” have begun.

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Youtube Video (02-04-2015)
“Beach nourishment projects like this have become commonplace along the US East and Gulf Coasts. These projects have immediate environmental impacts through burial of nearshore habitat and increased turbidity during project placement.The cumulative environmental impacts of doing this repeatedly on the same beach while conducting projects from Maine to Texas is unknown. But, we should be concerned. ” —Robert S. Young, PhD, Director, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, Professor, Coastal Geology, Western Carolina University

Palm Beach Sea Turtles Killed During Beach Renourishment Project, Broward Palm Beach New Times (04-28-2015)

Is Beach Renourishment Worth The Money? WWAY News (02-16-2015)

“The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

How Your Taxes Help Inflate The Value Of Coastal Properties Threatened By Climate Change

sand-dredging-miami
On-board a sand dredger, offshore Miami.
“Sand is the second most consumed natural resource, after water. The construction-building industry is by far the largest consumer of this finite resource. The traditional building of one average-sized house requires 200 tons of sand; a hospital requires 3,000 tons of sand; each kilometer of highway built requires 30,000 tons of sand… A nuclear plant, a staggering 12 million tons of sand…” Captions and Photograph by “Sand Wars” Filmmaker: © Denis Delestrac

Excerpts;

Between 1995 and 2002, the U.S. federal government spent $787 million on beach nourishment and has historically subsidized two-thirds of total nourishment costs to coastal communities.

As seas rise and storms surge, replenishment costs rise. “The sand used to fortify beaches has also become something of a precious commodity, shockingly expensive and difficult to mine and move.”

Researchers found “that a sudden removal of federal nourishment subsidies, as has been proposed, could trigger a dramatic downward adjustment in coastal real estate, analogous to the bursting of a bubble.”

Replenishment is a losing battle, and it’s becoming more and more expensive…

Read Full Article, ThinkProgress

Climate Adaptation and Policy-Induced Inflation of Coastal Property Value, PlosOne (03-25-2015)
Human population density in the coastal zone and potential impacts of climate change underscore a growing conflict between coastal development and an encroaching shoreline. Rising sea-levels and increased storminess threaten to accelerate coastal erosion, while growing demand for coastal real estate encourages more spending to hold back the sea in spite of the shrinking federal budget for beach nourishment. As climatic drivers and federal policies for beach nourishment change, the evolution of coastline mitigation and property values is uncertain…

Endless Erosion Battle a Matter of Money, The St Petersburg Tribune (07-21-2014)

A Beach Project Built on Sand; By Robert S. Young, PhD, in The New York Times (08-22-2014)

Climate Change Concerns Weigh On Cape Home-Buying Decisions, Boston Globe (09-22-2014)
Increased awareness of rising sea levels, flood zones, and storm surge have potential buyers rethinking how close a relationship they want with the ocean…

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Video (02-04-2015)

From Coast To Coast, Vanity Fair (07-23-2013)
At opposite ends of the country, two of America’s most golden coastal enclaves are waging the same desperate battle against erosion…

Reuters’ Water’s Edge Report – Part I And Part II (09-19-2014)

Waikiki Beach Eroding Less Than A Year After $2.2M Sand Restoration, Pacific Business News (01-24-2013)
A section of Hawaii’s famed Waikiki Beach is starting to erode, less than a year after the completion of a $2.2 million project to replenish the sand on about 1,730 feet of shoreline that had been suffering from chronic erosion.

Let’s Talk About Sand: Denis Delestrac At TEDxBarcelona

The Deadly Global War for Sand, WIRED (03-26-2015)

Sand Wars, An Investigation Documentary, By Denis Delestrac
Is sand an infinite resource? Can the existing supply satisfy a gigantic demand fueled by construction booms? What are the consequences of intensive beach sand mining for the environment and the neighboring populations…? This investigation takes us around the globe to unveil a new gold rush and a disturbing fact: the “Sand Wars” have begun…

The Changing Carolina Coast: Sand Is Everywhere, Except When It Isn’t

topsail-denis-delestrac
Topsail beach erosion, North Carolina. Photo courtesy of: © Denis Delestrac

Excerpts;

According to a database created by Western Carolina University’s Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, more than $500 million has been spent rebuilding North Carolina’s beaches. Since 1983, we’ve spent about $100 million alone replacing Highway 12, built on the sands of the Outer Banks…

Read Full Article, WUNC

Is Beach Renourishment Worth The Money? WWAY News (02-16-2015)

The Folly Of Poorly Executed Beach Renourishment, The Post And Courier (05-06-2014)

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Video (02-04-2015)

“North Carolina: The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

That ‘More Realistic’ Sea-Level Report? Not Good News for NC, By Robert S. Young, Ph.D., professor of coastal geology at Western Carolina University; News Observer (05-06-2015)

North Carolina Should Move With Nature on Coast, News Observer (01-05-2015)

Croatan Beach Residents Say too Much Dredging Hurts Shoreline, VA

dredging-replenishment-virginia-beach
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, renourishing Virginia beach with dredged sand, VA. Photo source: ©© U.S Army

Excerpts;

The dredging main goal is the same as it is every year: to replace sand and build up dunes on a public beach that gets pummeled by storms nearly every winter…

Read Full Article, Hampton Roads /Pilot Online

Editorial: Beach Replenishment is No Cure-All, Asburry Park Press (05-14-2015)
What do you do if a beach replenishment project is not working the way it was intended? That is the question facing Sea Bright, NJ, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers these days.The Army Corps has been reconstructing the beaches along the Jersey Shore that were left battered by superstorm Sandy. The beach replenishment project from Sea Bright to Monmouth Beach was completed from July to November 2013, adding 2.2 million cubic yards of sand at a cost of $25.6 million. Problem is, a section of Sea Bright’s North Beach is already eroding at an alarming rate. The erosion started two winters ago and only worsened this past winter…

A Beach Project Built on Sand; By Robert S. Young, PhD; New York Times (08-22-2014)
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo announced a $207 million plan to dredge millions of tons of sand off the south shore of Long Island and spread it along the beaches and dunes. It is a colossal waste of money and another consequence of the nation’s failure to develop a coherent plan to address the risks from storms faced by states along the eastern seaboard and gulf coast…

Editorial: Beach Replenishment is No Cure-All

waikiki-beach-renourishment
Waikiki beach-renourishement, 2012. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

What do you do if a beach replenishment project is not working the way it was intended? That is the question facing Sea Bright, NJ, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers these days.

The Army Corps has been reconstructing the beaches along the Jersey Shore that were left battered by superstorm Sandy. The beach replenishment project from Sea Bright to Monmouth Beach was completed from July to November 2013, adding 2.2 million cubic yards of sand at a cost of $25.6 million. Problem is, a section of Sea Bright’s North Beach is already eroding at an alarming rate. The erosion started two winters ago and only worsened this past winter…

Read Full Article, Asburry Park Press

Something Strange is Happening to Sea Bright’s Beach, NJ News (05-07-2015)
A section of the beach, newly widened after Hurricane Sandy, is eroding so fast that fledging dunes can’t take hold to help with storm protection.

A Beach Project Built on Sand; By Robert S. Young, PhD; New York Times (08-22-2014)
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo announced a $207 million plan to dredge millions of tons of sand off the south shore of Long Island and spread it along the beaches and dunes. It is a colossal waste of money and another consequence of the nation’s failure to develop a coherent plan to address the risks from storms faced by states along the eastern seaboard and gulf coast…

Is Beach Renourishment Worth The Money? WWAY News (02-16-2015)

Endless Erosion Battle a Matter of Money, The St Petersburg Tribune (07-21-2014)

Waikiki Beach Eroding Less Than A Year After $2.2M Sand Restoration, Pacific Business News (01-24-2013)
A section of Hawaii’s famed Waikiki Beach is starting to erode, less than a year after the completion of a $2.2 million project to replenish the sand on about 1,730 feet of shoreline that had been suffering from chronic erosion.

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Youtube Video (02-04-2015)
“Beach nourishment projects like this have become commonplace along the US East and Gulf Coasts. These projects have immediate environmental impacts through burial of nearshore habitat and increased turbidity during project placement.The cumulative environmental impacts of doing this repeatedly on the same beach while conducting projects from Maine to Texas is unknown. But, we should be concerned. ” —Robert S. Young, PhD, Director, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, Professor, Coastal Geology, Western Carolina University

We Need to Retreat From the Beach, An Op Ed by Orrin H. Pilkey

“”The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

Reuters’ Water’s Edge Report – Part I And Part II (09-19-2014)

Sandy Reminds Us of Coastal Hazards, by Pr. Robert Young

Something Strange is Happening to Sea Bright’s Beach, NJ

sea-bright-nj
Sea Bright, NJ. Aerial pictures of New Jersey’s coast, after superstorm Sandy devastated the area. Photo courtesy of: © Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines (PSDS) / WCU

Excerpts;

A section of the beach, newly widened after Hurricane Sandy, is eroding so fast that fledging dunes can’t take hold to help with storm protection.

The beach, which was about 100 feet wide, is less than half that size now — just in a 150-foot stretch in the very north end of town that Lamia said had never before experienced that type of erosion…

Read Full Article, NJ News

A Beach Project Built on Sand; By Robert S. Young, PhD; New York Times (08-22-2014)
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo announced a $207 million plan to dredge millions of tons of sand off the south shore of Long Island and spread it along the beaches and dunes. It is a colossal waste of money and another consequence of the nation’s failure to develop a coherent plan to address the risks from storms faced by states along the eastern seaboard and gulf coast…

“”The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

Duck Beach is Sinking Fast and Deep, NC

duck-beach-pier
Duck beach pier, North Carolina. Photo source: ©© Larry and Laura

Excerpts;

The beach at Duck is sinking faster than the ocean is rising. The phenomenon, called vertical land movement, is a lesser-known part of the debate over sea-level rise…

Read Full Article, PilotOnline

We Need to Retreat From the Beach, An Op Ed by Orrin H. Pilkey

North Carolina Should Move With Nature on Coast, News Observer (01-05-2015)

Sea Level Rise Accelerating In U.S. Atlantic Coast, USGS (06-25-2012)

Watching The Rising Tides Along North Carolina’s Coast, (11-15-2013)
Professor Robert Young, director of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines and a professor of coastal geology at Western Carolina University, with North Carolina Public Radio host Frank Stasio, discussing the consequences of climate change and how rising sea levels have a strong effect on the beaches of North Carolina…

How Did Rocks End Up on the Beach? NC

topsail-beach
Topsail Beach, North Carolina. Photo source: ©© Lee Ruk

Excerpts;

State rules make it clear that sand from an ocean bottom riddled with rocks should not be pumped onto the state’s beaches during beach re-nourishment projects.

Yet, a beach pumping project on the south end of this Onslow County town littered the beach with tons of rocks, some the size of basketballs. And no one stopped it…

Read Full Article, Coastal Review Online

North Topsail Beach Discusses “How Did Rocks End Up on the Beach?” Ntbnc

A 50-year Sand Replenishment Project, Encinitas and Solana Beaches, CA

encinitas-erosion
Coastal erosion, Encinitas, California. Photo source: ©© Tim Buss

Excerpts;

In recent years, the 50-year replenishment plan has been hit with setbacks. Because the revised plan called for less sand on beaches, it ran the risk of losing federal funding. Specifically, Corps officials two years ago said they would be reluctant to back a smaller-scale project, because it wouldn’t be as economically beneficial under a cost-benefit ratio model.

For the price of the plan, the cities could have looked at buying bluff-top properties to allow for “managed retreat.” That way, the bluffs could naturally erode, putting sand back on the beaches…

Read Full Article, Encinitas Advocate

Is Beach Renourishment Worth The Money? WWAY News (02-16-2015)

Endless Erosion Battle a Matter of Money, The St Petersburg Tribune (07-21-2014)

Waikiki Beach Eroding Less Than A Year After $2.2M Sand Restoration, Pacific Business News (01-24-2013)
A section of Hawaii’s famed Waikiki Beach is starting to erode, less than a year after the completion of a $2.2 million project to replenish the sand on about 1,730 feet of shoreline that had been suffering from chronic erosion.

Palm Beach Sea Turtles Killed During Beach Renourishment Project, Broward Palm Beach New Times (04-28-2015)

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Youtube Video (02-04-2015)
“Beach nourishment projects like this have become commonplace along the US East and Gulf Coasts. These projects have immediate environmental impacts through burial of nearshore habitat and increased turbidity during project placement.The cumulative environmental impacts of doing this repeatedly on the same beach while conducting projects from Maine to Texas is unknown. But, we should be concerned. ” —Robert S. Young, PhD, Director, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, Professor, Coastal Geology, Western Carolina University

Reuters’ Water’s Edge Report – Part I And Part II (09-19-2014)

“North Carolina: The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

We Need to Retreat From the Beach, An Op Ed by Orrin H. Pilkey