Category Archives: Beach Nourishment

How Did Rocks End Up on the Beach? NC

topsail-beach
Topsail Beach, North Carolina. Photo source: ©© Lee Ruk

Excerpts;

State rules make it clear that sand from an ocean bottom riddled with rocks should not be pumped onto the state’s beaches during beach re-nourishment projects.

Yet, a beach pumping project on the south end of this Onslow County town littered the beach with tons of rocks, some the size of basketballs. And no one stopped it…

Read Full Article, Coastal Review Online

North Topsail Beach Discusses “How Did Rocks End Up on the Beach?” Ntbnc

A 50-year Sand Replenishment Project, Encinitas and Solana Beaches, CA

encinitas-erosion
Coastal erosion, Encinitas, California. Photo source: ©© Tim Buss

Excerpts;

In recent years, the 50-year replenishment plan has been hit with setbacks. Because the revised plan called for less sand on beaches, it ran the risk of losing federal funding. Specifically, Corps officials two years ago said they would be reluctant to back a smaller-scale project, because it wouldn’t be as economically beneficial under a cost-benefit ratio model.

For the price of the plan, the cities could have looked at buying bluff-top properties to allow for “managed retreat.” That way, the bluffs could naturally erode, putting sand back on the beaches…

Read Full Article, Encinitas Advocate

Is Beach Renourishment Worth The Money? WWAY News (02-16-2015)

Endless Erosion Battle a Matter of Money, The St Petersburg Tribune (07-21-2014)

Waikiki Beach Eroding Less Than A Year After $2.2M Sand Restoration, Pacific Business News (01-24-2013)
A section of Hawaii’s famed Waikiki Beach is starting to erode, less than a year after the completion of a $2.2 million project to replenish the sand on about 1,730 feet of shoreline that had been suffering from chronic erosion.

Palm Beach Sea Turtles Killed During Beach Renourishment Project, Broward Palm Beach New Times (04-28-2015)

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Youtube Video (02-04-2015)
“Beach nourishment projects like this have become commonplace along the US East and Gulf Coasts. These projects have immediate environmental impacts through burial of nearshore habitat and increased turbidity during project placement.The cumulative environmental impacts of doing this repeatedly on the same beach while conducting projects from Maine to Texas is unknown. But, we should be concerned. ” —Robert S. Young, PhD, Director, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, Professor, Coastal Geology, Western Carolina University

Reuters’ Water’s Edge Report – Part I And Part II (09-19-2014)

“North Carolina: The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

We Need to Retreat From the Beach, An Op Ed by Orrin H. Pilkey

Palm Beach Sea Turtles Killed During Beach Renourishment Project

dredging-ry
Palm Beach Mid-Town dredge project, 1-25-2015. Image source: Youtube
“Beach nourishment projects like this have become commonplace along the US East and Gulf Coasts. These projects have immediate environmental impacts through burial of nearshore habitat and increased turbidity during project placement.The cumulative environmental impacts of doing this repeatedly on the same beach while conducting projects from Maine to Texas is unknown. But, we should be concerned. ” —Robert S. Young, PhD, Director, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, Professor, Coastal Geology, Western Carolina University.

Excerpts;

South Floridians have for years grappled with the issue of beach erosion. Condos continue to go up despite wave action that carries sand away. Residents want wide, sandy beaches — and so do turtles, who need it to nest. Almost every city in South Florida has at some point resorted to having sand from afar brought in to artificially replenish the beaches.

But as this project shows, turtles are being killed in the machinery…

Read Full Article, Broward Palm Beach New Times

Beach Renourishment Project That’s Killed Sea Turtles May Have Used Wrong Sand, Broward Palm Beach New Times

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Youtube Video (02-04-2015)
“Beach nourishment projects like this have become commonplace along the US East and Gulf Coasts. These projects have immediate environmental impacts through burial of nearshore habitat and increased turbidity during project placement.The cumulative environmental impacts of doing this repeatedly on the same beach while conducting projects from Maine to Texas is unknown. But, we should be concerned. ” —Robert S. Young, PhD, Director, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, Professor, Coastal Geology, Western Carolina University

Is Beach Renourishment Worth The Money?, WWAY News (02-16-2015)

Waikiki Beach Eroding Less Than A Year After $2.2M Sand Restoration, Pacific Business News (01-24-2013)
A section of Hawaii’s famed Waikiki Beach is starting to erode, less than a year after the completion of a $2.2 million project to replenish the sand on about 1,730 feet of shoreline that had been suffering from chronic erosion.

Endless Erosion Battle a Matter of Money, The St Petersburg Tribune (07-21-2014)

“The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

Sand Cents

topsail-denis-delestrac
Topsail beach, North Carolina. Photo courtesy of: © Denis Delestrac

Excerpts;

The value of many oceanfront properties on the East Coast could drop dramatically if Congress were to suddenly end federal beach nourishment subsidies. Values could fall by as much as 17 percent in towns with high property values and almost 34 percent in towns with low property values…

Read Full Article, Carteret County News

Climate Adaptation and Policy-Induced Inflation of Coastal Property Value, PlosOne (03-25-2015)
Human population density in the coastal zone and potential impacts of climate change underscore a growing conflict between coastal development and an encroaching shoreline. Rising sea-levels and increased storminess threaten to accelerate coastal erosion, while growing demand for coastal real estate encourages more spending to hold back the sea in spite of the shrinking federal budget for beach nourishment. As climatic drivers and federal policies for beach nourishment change, the evolution of coastline mitigation and property values is uncertain…

Is Beach Renourishment Worth The Money? WWAY News (02-16-2015)

Endless Erosion Battle a Matter of Money, The St Petersburg Tribune (07-21-2014)

Climate Change Concerns Weigh On Cape Home-Buying Decisions, Boston Globe (09-22-2014)
Increased awareness of rising sea levels, flood zones, and storm surge have potential buyers rethinking how close a relationship they want with the ocean…

The Folly Of Poorly Executed Beach Renourishment, The Post And Courier (05-06-2014)

Coastal Erosion Sparks ‘Sand Wars’ In New England (12-21-2013)
Sand is becoming New England coastal dwellers’ most coveted and controversial commodity as they try to fortify beaches against rising seas and severe erosion caused by violent storms.

A Beach Project Built on Sand; By Robert S. Young, PhD, in The New York Times (08-22-2014)

Waikiki Beach Eroding Less Than A Year After $2.2M Sand Restoration, Pacific Business News (01-24-2013)
A section of Hawaii’s famed Waikiki Beach is starting to erode, less than a year after the completion of a $2.2 million project to replenish the sand on about 1,730 feet of shoreline that had been suffering from chronic erosion.

Dispute in Hamptons Set Off by Effort to Hold Back Ocean, The New York Times (04-19-2013)

From Coast To Coast, Vanity Fair (07-23-2013)
At opposite ends of the country, two of America’s most golden coastal enclaves are waging the same desperate battle against erosion…

Reuters’ Water’s Edge Report – Part I And Part II (09-19-2014)

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Video (02-04-2015)

“North Carolina: The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

Dealing with Beach Erosion; Maintenance, Monitoring Program Eyed; AL

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Coastal erosion, Dog river mouth, Mobile, Alabama. Photo source: ©© Cesar Harada

Excerpts;

Fairhope, Alabama. Since a $50,000 beach repair emergency project was completed last July, a large chunk of beach has eroded and the council will soon consider implementing a beach monitoring and maintenance program.

The “primary goal is the establishment of a city Beach Monitoring and Maintenance Plan which maintains the beaches, develops a vegetation plan and minimizes wind-blown sand issues…”

Read Full Article, AL

The Jersey Shore’s Unquenchable Thirst for Sand

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Bringing in sand to replenish beach that was eroded by Hurricane Sandy, at Kimbles Beach, New Jersey. Captions And Photo source: ©© USFWS

Excerpts;

New Jersey, with its 127-mile coastline, has spent about $800 million on beach replenishment over the last 30 years – more than any other state, including Florida, which has an 1,800-mile coastline.

That is equivalent to 80 million cubic yards of sand – or about a dump truck load for every foot of beach…

Read Full Article, Philly

Is Beach Renourishment Worth The Money? WWAY News (02-16-2015)

A Beach Project Built on Sand; By Robert S. Young, PhD, The New York Times (08-22-2014)
Earlier this month, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo announced a $207 million plan to dredge millions of tons of sand off the south shore of Long Island and spread it along the beaches and dunes. It is a colossal waste of money and another consequence of the nation’s failure to develop a coherent plan to address the risks from storms faced by states along the eastern seaboard and gulf coast.

Waikiki Beach Eroding Less Than A Year After $2.2M Sand Restoration, Pacific Business News (01-24-2013)
A section of Hawaii’s famed Waikiki Beach is starting to erode, less than a year after the completion of a $2.2 million project to replenish the sand on about 1,730 feet of shoreline that had been suffering from chronic erosion.

The Folly Of Poorly Executed Beach Renourishment, The Post And Courier (05-06-2014)

Endless Erosion Battle a Matter of Money, The St Petersburg Tribune (07-21-2014)

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Video (02-04-2015)

From Coast To Coast, Vanity Fair (07-23-2013)
At opposite ends of the country, two of America’s most golden coastal enclaves are waging the same desperate battle against erosion…

“North Carolina: The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

Coastal Erosion Sparks ‘Sand Wars’ In New England (12-21-2013)
Sand is becoming New England coastal dwellers’ most coveted and controversial commodity as they try to fortify beaches against rising seas and severe erosion caused by violent storms.

Let’s Talk About Sand: Denis Delestrac At TEDxBarcelona

How the Surfing Business Could be a Wipeout for an Iconic Calif. Town

surfers
Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

To create perfect surfing conditions, nature needs to provide the right amount of deep-ocean swells, peculiar ocean-floor geography and wind.

“Because they’re out in the water surfers are a good indicator species for the impacts of climate change.”

Coupled with sea-level rise, as beaches erode, the practice of beach replenishment – dredging and dumping sand to extend beaches and reclaim them from the ocean – is also destroying surf in some communities…

Read Full Article, EENews

Sebastian Inlet, Florida; By Eddie Jarvis (04-01-2011)
A surfer’s view of shoreline engineering.

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Video (02-04-2015)

Endless Erosion Battle a Matter of Money, The St Petersburg Tribune (07-21-2014)

Waikiki Beach Eroding Less Than A Year After $2.2M Sand Restoration, Pacific Business News (01-24-2013)
A section of Hawaii’s famed Waikiki Beach is starting to erode, less than a year after the completion of a $2.2 million project to replenish the sand on about 1,730 feet of shoreline that had been suffering from chronic erosion.

From Coast To Coast, Vanity Fair (07-23-2013)
At opposite ends of the country, two of America’s most golden coastal enclaves are waging the same desperate battle against erosion…

We Need to Retreat From the Beach, An Op Ed by Orrin H. Pilkey

” The Last Beach,” a book by Orrin H. Pilkey And J. Andrew G. Cooper
“In The Last Beach, the authors describe the top five threats to beaches around the world. Even a quick overview of these threats suggests a strategy for confronting the degradation and loss of beaches. It’s no surprise that a comprehensive, long-term beach protection strategy requires significant changes to our economic system, a system that has overdeveloped and polluted beaches to the extent that they have become unhealthy places to swim or even play in the sand…”—Countercurrents

Is Beach Renourishment Worth The Money?

beach-re-nourishment
Beach re-nourishment, Goleta Beach, California. Photo source: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

Surf, sand and sun are big draws for southeastern North Carolina. In fact, our beaches keep much of our economy afloat, but they take a lot of maintenance…

“Now, we have hundreds of thousands of people living at the coastline, and so no matter what you do, you’re increasing the threat…”

Read Full Article and View News Video, WWAY News

Waikiki Beach Eroding Less Than A Year After $2.2M Sand Restoration, Pacific Business News (01-24-2013)
A section of Hawaii’s famed Waikiki Beach is starting to erode, less than a year after the completion of a $2.2 million project to replenish the sand on about 1,730 feet of shoreline that had been suffering from chronic erosion.

The Folly Of Poorly Executed Beach Renourishment, The Post And Courier (05-06-2014)

Endless Erosion Battle a Matter of Money, The St Petersburg Tribune (07-21-2014)

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Video (02-04-2015)

A Beach Project Built on Sand; By Robert S. Young, PhD, in The New York Times (08-22-2014)

From Coast To Coast, Vanity Fair (07-23-2013)
At opposite ends of the country, two of America’s most golden coastal enclaves are waging the same desperate battle against erosion…

“North Carolina: The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

North Carolina Should Move With Nature on Coast, News Observer (01-05-2015)

We Need to Retreat From the Beach, An Op Ed by Orrin H. Pilkey

Let’s Talk About Sand: Denis Delestrac At TEDxBarcelona
Denis Delestrac latest feature documentary, “Sand Wars” is an epic eco-thriller that takes the audience around the globe to unveil a new gold rush and a disturbing fact: we are running out of sand! In this TEDxBarcelona talk, he explains us where sand comes from and where it ends up…

” The Last Beach,” a book by Orrin H. Pilkey And J. Andrew G. Cooper
“In The Last Beach, the authors describe the top five threats to beaches around the world. Even a quick overview of these threats suggests a strategy for confronting the degradation and loss of beaches. It’s no surprise that a comprehensive, long-term beach protection strategy requires significant changes to our economic system, a system that has overdeveloped and polluted beaches to the extent that they have become unhealthy places to swim or even play in the sand…”—Countercurrents

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Video

A Reef Rescue Video, Published on Youtube January 31st, 2015.


” Beach nourishment projects like this have become commonplace along the US East and Gulf Coasts. These projects have immediate environmental impacts through burial of nearshore habitat and increased turbidity during project placement.

The cumulative environmental impacts of doing this repeatedly on the same beach while conducting projects from Maine to Texas is unknown.

But, we should be concerned. ”

Robert S. Young, PhD, Director, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, Professor, Coastal Geology, Western Carolina University