Category Archives: Beach Nourishment

Economy Winner, Environment Loser in Renourishment

beach-re-nourishment
Beach re-nourishment, Goleta Beach, California. Photo source: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

“One thing that locks you into renourishment is to continue beach construction and development as usual,” Young says as he stares at the five yellow CAT machines “The long-range or long-term solution is to have greater setbacks and to allow the beach to renourish itself naturally…”

Read Full Article, Pensacola News Journal

Is Beach Renourishment Worth The Money? WWAY News (02-16-2015)

Editorial: Beach Replenishment is No Cure-All, Asburry Park Press (05-14-2015)

Waikiki Beach Eroding Less Than A Year After $2.2M Sand Restoration, Pacific Business News (01-24-2013)
A section of Hawaii’s famed Waikiki Beach is starting to erode, less than a year after the completion of a $2.2 million project to replenish the sand on about 1,730 feet of shoreline that had been suffering from chronic erosion.

A Beach Project Built on Sand; By Robert S. Young, PhD, in The New York Times (08-22-2014)

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Youtube Video (02-04-2015)
“Beach nourishment projects like this have become commonplace along the US East and Gulf Coasts. These projects have immediate environmental impacts through burial of nearshore habitat and increased turbidity during project placement.The cumulative environmental impacts of doing this repeatedly on the same beach while conducting projects from Maine to Texas is unknown. But, we should be concerned. ” —Robert S. Young, PhD, Director, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, Professor, Coastal Geology, Western Carolina University

From Coast To Coast, Vanity Fair (07-23-2013)
At opposite ends of the country, two of America’s most golden coastal enclaves are waging the same desperate battle against erosion…

“North Carolina: The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

We Need to Retreat From the Beach, An Op Ed by Orrin H. Pilkey

Could We Run Out of Sand for Eroded Beaches?

sand-dredging-miami
On-board a sand dredger, offshore Miami. Photo courtesy of: “Sand Wars” Award-Winning Filmmaker: © Denis Delestrac (2013).

Excerpts;

With king tides, persistent winds and large waves from Tropical Storm Erika and Hurricane Joaquin making erosion particularly bad this year, the demand for sand is high – but is it possible we could run out?

“Sand isn’t a renewable resource,” said Stephen Leatherman, a professor of coastal sciences at Florida International University. “We’ve already dredged up most of the easy, cheap sand…”

Read Full Article, Sun sentinel

Where Sand Is Gold, the Reserves Are Running Dry, The New York Times (08-26-2013)

Sand Shortage Leaves South Florida Beaches Vulnerable to Erosion, Tampa Bay Times (08-19-2013)

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Youtube Video (02-04-2015)
“Beach nourishment projects like this have become commonplace along the US East and Gulf Coasts. These projects have immediate environmental impacts through burial of nearshore habitat and increased turbidity during project placement.The cumulative environmental impacts of doing this repeatedly on the same beach while conducting projects from Maine to Texas is unknown. But, we should be concerned. ” —Robert S. Young, PhD, Director, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, Professor, Coastal Geology, Western Carolina University

Is Beach Renourishment Worth The Money? WWAY News (02-16-2015)

Waikiki Beach Eroding Less Than A Year After $2.2M Sand Restoration, Pacific Business News (Uploaded 01-24-2013)
A section of Hawaii’s famed Waikiki Beach is starting to erode, less than a year after the completion of a $2.2 million project to replenish the sand on about 1,730 feet of shoreline that had been suffering from chronic erosion.

“The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

“Sand Wars,” An Investigation Documentary, By Denis Delestrac
Based on encounters with sand smugglers, barefoot millionaires, corrupt politicians, unscrupulous real estate developers and environmentalists, this investigation takes us around the globe to unveil a new gold rush and a disturbing fact: the “Sand Wars” have begun.

Sand, Rarer Than One Thinks: A UNEP report (March 2014)
Despite the colossal quantities of sand and gravel being used, our increasing dependence on them and the significant impact that their extraction has on the environment, this issue has been mostly ignored by policy makers and remains largely unknown by the general public…

Let’s Talk About Sand: Denis Delestrac At TEDxBarcelona

Why This Treacherous Hawaiian Beach, Keeps Breaking People’s Necks

sandy-beach-hawaii
Sandy Beach Hawaii. Photo source: ©© Justin del la Ornellas

Excerpts;

Even for an experienced surfer, it’s easy to make mistakes at Sandy Beach, notorious for its shallow shore break. These beaches are deceptive, sometimes lethally.

There were 208 spinal-cord injuries due to “ocean activities” in Hawaii between 2009 and 2013. But these injuries can happen anywhere, including beaches along the Atlantic coast, where their numbers are increasing.

Searching for a reason to the increase, researchers focused on beach sand replenishment, which is constant along the Atlantic coast.

Adding new sand didn’t merely widen the beaches, they found — it made them higher, “resulting in steep slopes that can cause large waves to break close to shore.

In other words, replenishment was doing to Delaware’s beaches what nature long ago did to Hawaii’s Sandy Beach…

Read Full Article, The Washington Post

Editorial: Beach Replenishment is No Cure-All, Asburry Park Press (05-14-2015)

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Youtube Video (02-04-2015)
“Beach nourishment projects like this have become commonplace along the US East and Gulf Coasts. These projects have immediate environmental impacts through burial of nearshore habitat and increased turbidity during project placement.The cumulative environmental impacts of doing this repeatedly on the same beach while conducting projects from Maine to Texas is unknown. But, we should be concerned. ” —Robert S. Young, PhD, Director, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, Professor, Coastal Geology, Western Carolina University

How Your Taxes Help Inflate The Value Of Coastal Properties Threatened By Climate Change, ThinkProgress (06-05-2015)
Between 1995 and 2002, the U.S. federal government spent $787 million on beach nourishment and has historically subsidized two-thirds of total nourishment costs to coastal communities. As seas rise and storms surge, replenishment costs rise. Replenishment is a losing battle, and it’s becoming more and more expensive…

Residents to Pay for Sand Replenishment at Malibu Beach, CA

malibu
Water sweeping across beachfront homes, Malibu, California. Captions and Photo source: ©© LA Waterkeeper

Excerpts;

Residents of Malibu’s Broad Beach have agreed to pay $31 million over the next decade to truck in tons of sand to build up the diminished shoreline filled with homes…

Read Full Article, ABC News

Malibu’s Residents Plot New $20 Million Plan to Stop Sand Erosion, Hollywood Reporter (05-24-2014)

Is Beach Renourishment Worth The Money? WWAY News (02-16-2015)

Editorial: Beach Replenishment is No Cure-All, Asburry Park Press (05-14-2015)

Waikiki Beach Eroding Less Than A Year After $2.2M Sand Restoration, Pacific Business News (01-24-2013)

Scientists Foresee Losses as Cities Fight Beach Erosion, Climate Central (09-14-2015)

“North Carolina: The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Youtube Video (02-04-2015)
“Beach nourishment projects like this have become commonplace along the US East and Gulf Coasts. These projects have immediate environmental impacts through burial of nearshore habitat and increased turbidity during project placement.The cumulative environmental impacts of doing this repeatedly on the same beach while conducting projects from Maine to Texas is unknown. But, we should be concerned. ” —Robert S. Young, PhD, Director, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, Professor, Coastal Geology, Western Carolina University

More Than $1B Spent Replenishing N.J. Beaches Over Past 30 Years

nj-beach-replenishment
Beach replenishment, New Jersey. Photo source: ©© The National Guard.
Andrew Coburn, assistant director of The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University, said. “Well over 99 percent of the shorelines that are nourished are developed so there is some economic value placed behind them.”

Excerpts;

More than $1 billion has been spent on beach replenishment efforts in New Jersey over the last three decades, according to data collected by coastal researchers. That money has paid for the placement of roughly 120 million cubic yards of sand on the state’s beaches, an amount that could fill a typical dump truck 12 million times…

Read Full Article, NJ Online

Still Recovering from Sandy, New Jersey Beaches Hit Again with Major Erosion, The Morning Call (10-06-2015)

Something Strange is Happening to Sea Bright’s Beach, NJ News (05-07-2015)
A section of the beach, newly widened after Hurricane Sandy, is eroding so fast that fledging dunes can’t take hold to help with storm protection.

The Jersey Shore’s Unquenchable Thirst for Sand, Philly (03-09-2015)

Editorial: Beach Replenishment is No Cure-All, Asburry Park Press (05-14-2015)

Is Beach Renourishment Worth The Money? WWAY News (02-16-2015)

A Beach Project Built on Sand; By Robert S. Young, PhD; New York Times (08-22-2014)

Scientists Foresee Losses as Cities Fight Beach Erosion, Climate Central (09-14-2015)

“North Carolina: The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

Waikiki Beach Eroding Less Than A Year After $2.2M Sand Restoration, Pacific Business News (01-24-2013)
A section of Hawaii’s famed Waikiki Beach is starting to erode, less than a year after the completion of a $2.2 million project to replenish the sand on about 1,730 feet of shoreline that had been suffering from chronic erosion.

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Youtube Video (02-04-2015)
“Beach nourishment projects like this have become commonplace along the US East and Gulf Coasts. These projects have immediate environmental impacts through burial of nearshore habitat and increased turbidity during project placement.The cumulative environmental impacts of doing this repeatedly on the same beach while conducting projects from Maine to Texas is unknown. But, we should be concerned. ” —Robert S. Young, PhD, Director, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, Professor, Coastal Geology, Western Carolina University

Sand, Rarer Than One Thinks: A UNEP report (March 2014)
Despite the colossal quantities of sand and gravel being used, our increasing dependence on them and the significant impact that their extraction has on the environment, this issue has been mostly ignored by policy makers and remains largely unknown by the general public…

Sand Wars, An Investigation Documentary, By Denis Delestrac

Officials Scramble for Funding to Replenish Storm-Damaged Beaches, SC

myrtle-beach
Myrtle Beach erosion, SC. Photo source: ©© Randy.
“Development is absolutely responsible for the majority of the beach nourishment,” Andrew Coburn, assistant director of The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University, said. “Well over 99 percent of the shorelines that are nourished are developed so there is some economic value placed behind them.”

Excerpts;

Severe weather events this summer washed away hundreds of acres of sand, ripped apart walkways and stairs leading over fragile dunes, and caused significant erosion to the natural barriers that protect inland areas from coastal flooding.

The trifecta in recent weeks of storm surge from Hurricane Joaquin, king tides, and nearly 2 feet of record rainfall, contributed to the loss of nearly 80 percent of the sand that replenished North Myrtle Beaches during the last renourishment project in 2008. This project to replenish the beaches with 750,000 cubic yards of sand cost nearly $11 million…

Read Full Article, Myrtle Beaches Online

The Changing Carolina Coast: Sand Is Everywhere, Except When It Isn’t, WUNC (06-02-2015)

Endless Erosion Battle a Matter of Money, The St Petersburg Tribune (07-21-2014)

Sandbagged: The Undoing of a Quarter Century of North Carolina Coastal Conservation, Op Ed by Gary Lazorick (07-04-2011)
Rows of houses with overlapping sandbag walls create huge problems. The walls do as much damage to the beach as hardened seawalls. Removing the sandbags from one property potentially damages all of the others…

Sea Level Rise Accelerating In U.S. Atlantic Coast, USGS (06-25-2012)

Scientists Foresee Losses as Cities Fight Beach Erosion, Climate Central (09-14-2015)

A New Report Lays Bare the Effects of Climate Change on the N.C. Coast, IndyWeek (04-09-2015)

Watching The Rising Tides Along North Carolina’s Coast, (11-15-2013)
Professor Robert Young, director of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines and a professor of coastal geology at Western Carolina University, with North Carolina Public Radio host Frank Stasio, discussing the consequences of climate change and how rising sea levels have a strong effect on the beaches of North Carolina…

“North Carolina: The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

Is Beach Renourishment Worth The Money? WWAY News (02-16-2015)

Pilkey’s Call: Save The Beaches; News Observer (08-09-2015)
Beaches move, and with rising sea levels they are moving faster. People try to slow or halt the process by dredging up sand or erecting imposing seawalls, but those are destructive and doomed efforts. To save the beaches, we must let beaches go where and how they want…

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Youtube Video (02-04-2015)
“Beach nourishment projects like this have become commonplace along the US East and Gulf Coasts. These projects have immediate environmental impacts through burial of nearshore habitat and increased turbidity during project placement.The cumulative environmental impacts of doing this repeatedly on the same beach while conducting projects from Maine to Texas is unknown. But, we should be concerned. ” —Robert S. Young, PhD, Director, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, Professor, Coastal Geology, Western Carolina University

North Carolina Should Move With Nature on Coast, News Observer (01-05-2015)

Still Recovering from Sandy, New Jersey Beaches Hit Again with Major Erosion

ortley-beach-nj-2
Ortley Beach and Lavallette, NJ. Aerial pictures of New Jersey’s coast, after superstorm Sandy devastated the area. Photo courtesy of: © Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines (PSDS) / WCU

Excerpts;

Days of gusting wind and pounding surf have caused severe beach erosion in many spots along the Jersey Shore.

Some beaches — including ones devastated by Superstorm Sandy three years ago and not yet replenished — appear to have lost most of their sand. And in many places where protective dunes stood between the ocean and homes, the surf cut large cliffs into the sand, leaving drop-offs up to 10 feet…

Read Full Article, The Morning Call

The Jersey Shore’s Unquenchable Thirst for Sand, Philly (03-09-2015)
New Jersey, with its 127-mile coastline, has spent about $800 million on beach replenishment over the last 30 years – more than any other state, including Florida, which has an 1,800-mile coastline. That is equivalent to 80 million cubic yards of sand – or about a dump truck load for every foot of beach…

Is Beach Renourishment Worth The Money? WWAY News (02-16-2015)

“Seawalls Kill Beaches,” Open Letters by Warner Chabot And Rob Young, (10-03-2014)

“North Carolina: The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

Scientists Foresee Losses as Cities Fight Beach Erosion

waikiki-beach-renourishment
Waikiki beach-renourishement, 2012. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care.
“Hawaii’s famed Waikiki Beach started to erode again, less than a year after the completion of a $2.2 million project to replenish the sand on about 1,730 feet of shoreline that had been suffering from chronic erosion.”Captions.
“Development is absolutely responsible for the majority of the beach nourishment,” Andrew Coburn, assistant director of The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University, said. “Well over 99 percent of the shorelines that are nourished are developed so there is some economic value placed behind them.”

Excerpts;

Beaches are facing off against a changing climate, and they’re losing ground. Literally…

Read Full Article, Climate Central

Pilkey’s Call: Save The Beaches; News Observer (08-09-2015)
Beaches move, and with rising sea levels they are moving faster. People try to slow or halt the process by dredging up sand or erecting imposing seawalls, but those are destructive and doomed efforts. To save the beaches, we must let beaches go where and how they want…

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Youtube Video (02-04-2015)
“Beach nourishment projects like this have become commonplace along the US East and Gulf Coasts. These projects have immediate environmental impacts through burial of nearshore habitat and increased turbidity during project placement.The cumulative environmental impacts of doing this repeatedly on the same beach while conducting projects from Maine to Texas is unknown. But, we should be concerned. ” —Robert S. Young, PhD, Director, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, Professor, Coastal Geology, Western Carolina University

“”The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

“Seawalls Kill Beaches,” Open Letters by Warner Chabot And Rob Young, (10-03-2014)

” The Last Beach,” a book by Orrin H. Pilkey And J. Andrew G. Cooper

Beach Erosion Troubles in Sarasota, Fl

lido-key
Lido key, Florida. Photo source: ©© Brian Y.

Excerpts;

For as long as Roger Barrow can remember, the sand along Lido Key has been on the move…

Read Full Article, TampabayNews

Editorial: Beach Replenishment is No Cure-All, Asburry Park Press (05-14-2015)
What do you do if a beach replenishment project is not working the way it was intended?

Is Beach Renourishment Worth The Money? WWAY News (02-16-2015)

Waikiki Beach Eroding Less Than A Year After $2.2M Sand Restoration, Pacific Business News (01-24-2013)
A section of Hawaii’s famed Waikiki Beach is starting to erode, less than a year after the completion of a $2.2 million project to replenish the sand on about 1,730 feet of shoreline that had been suffering from chronic erosion.

Endless Erosion Battle a Matter of Money, The St Petersburg Tribune (07-21-2014)

Palm Beach Mid-Town Dredge Project, A Youtube Video (02-04-2015)
“Beach nourishment projects like this have become commonplace along the US East and Gulf Coasts. These projects have immediate environmental impacts through burial of nearshore habitat and increased turbidity during project placement.The cumulative environmental impacts of doing this repeatedly on the same beach while conducting projects from Maine to Texas is unknown. But, we should be concerned. ” —Robert S. Young, PhD, Director, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, Professor, Coastal Geology, Western Carolina University

“”The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

Let’s Talk About Sand: Denis Delestrac At TEDxBarcelona (12-2013)