Ecosystem Destruction

Massive sand tubes being constructed in Walton County, Florida Massive sand tubes being constructed in Walton County, Florida under the ecologically-appealing euphemism of "dune enhancement devices." Photo: Gary Appleson, Caribbean Conservation Corporation.

A variety of threatened or endangered organisms use the beach as a vital part of their life cycle. The nearshore ecosystem extends from the meiofauna that exist between sand grains to the carnivorous fish that roam the surf zone.

Components include birds that feed and nest on the beach such as the piping plover (US east coast) and various turtles that lay their eggs here. The first steps in protecting birds, turtle nests and the rest of this ecosystem must be the protection of a natural, un-engineered beach.

Another major threat to beach ecosystems around the world is the ever increasing human population in coastal areas. The global migration of people towards the coast causes competition between humans and other species and humans usually negatively impact other species. New construction in coastal communities destroys beach ecosystems with every parking lot paved, road expanded, or sand dune lost. This increase also puts a burden on sanitation systems, transportation networks, and increases pollution in these diverse ecosystems.


Surfing in / Ecosystem Destruction

Caribbean Scientists Work to Limit Climate Impact on Marine Environment

Caribbean scientists say fishermen are already seeing the effects of climate change, so for a dozen or so years they’ve been designing systems and strategies to reduce the impacts on the industry.

Comments Off on Caribbean Scientists Work to Limit Climate Impact on Marine Environment

U.S. Study Shows Widening Disconnect with Nature, and Potential Solutions

A survey of 12,000 adults and children in the United States has shown that many people have lost a close connection with nature, although a wide cross-section of respondents expressed a desire to close that gap.

Comments Off on U.S. Study Shows Widening Disconnect with Nature, and Potential Solutions

Mapping the World’s Ocean Ecosystems

To meet the need for a consistent, objective, and complete description of open-ocean environments, the USGS formed a public-private partnership with ESRI, NOAA, academia, and non-profit organizations to produce the first ever detailed maps that group the entire global ocean into 37 distinct 3D ecosystems.

Comments Off on Mapping the World’s Ocean Ecosystems

How Singapore is creating more land for itself

The island off the southern tip of Malaysia reveals the future of building in an epoch of dwindling territory.

Comments Off on How Singapore is creating more land for itself

Sea Floor Erosion in Coral Reef Ecosystems Leaves Coastal Communities at Risk

In the first ecosystem-wide study of changing sea depths at five large coral reef tracts in Florida, the Caribbean and Hawai’i, U.S.G.S researchers found the sea floor is eroding in all five places, and the reefs cannot keep pace with sea level rise. As a result, coastal communities protected by the reefs are facing increased risks from storms, waves and erosion.

Comments Off on Sea Floor Erosion in Coral Reef Ecosystems Leaves Coastal Communities at Risk

Protecting Clipperton Island – The Most Remote Atoll on the Planet

Though this French overseas territory is now considered a marine protected area, it still faces threats from overfishing, with sharks and other large marine life nearly vanishing.

Comments Off on Protecting Clipperton Island – The Most Remote Atoll on the Planet

Easter Island

This remote volcanic island has intrigued generations of scholars. Famed for its monolithic statues, Easter Island is shrouded in mystery. Its population, once sizable, collapsed.

Comments Off on Easter Island

Warmer Oceans Increase Likelihood Of Toxic Shellfish, Study Finds

According to a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, domoic acid may become more prevalent as oceans warm, threatening birds and humans alike.

Comments Off on Warmer Oceans Increase Likelihood Of Toxic Shellfish, Study Finds

As China’s Mudflats Disappear, Shorebird Populations Rapidly Decline

Populations of some migratory shorebirds are declining by as much as 8 percent per year as mudflats in the Yellow Sea between China and South Korea disappear due to rising sea levels and infrastructure projects, according to new research.

Comments Off on As China’s Mudflats Disappear, Shorebird Populations Rapidly Decline