Ecosystem Destruction

Massive sand tubes being constructed in Walton County, Florida Massive sand tubes being constructed in Walton County, Florida under the ecologically-appealing euphemism of "dune enhancement devices." Photo: Gary Appleson, Caribbean Conservation Corporation.

A variety of threatened or endangered organisms use the beach as a vital part of their life cycle. The nearshore ecosystem extends from the meiofauna that exist between sand grains to the carnivorous fish that roam the surf zone.

Components include birds that feed and nest on the beach such as the piping plover (US east coast) and various turtles that lay their eggs here. The first steps in protecting birds, turtle nests and the rest of this ecosystem must be the protection of a natural, un-engineered beach.

Another major threat to beach ecosystems around the world is the ever increasing human population in coastal areas. The global migration of people towards the coast causes competition between humans and other species and humans usually negatively impact other species. New construction in coastal communities destroys beach ecosystems with every parking lot paved, road expanded, or sand dune lost. This increase also puts a burden on sanitation systems, transportation networks, and increases pollution in these diverse ecosystems.


Surfing in / Ecosystem Destruction

International Biodiversity Day, in Photos

On this International Day for Biological Diversity, we want to show you stunning images from one of the world’s richest places in biodiversity: Indonesia.

Comments Off on International Biodiversity Day, in Photos

Costa Rica Has a Sea Turtle Egg-Poaching Problem

Besides being beautiful, Costa Rica’s beaches are the nesting sites of four endangered sea turtle species, which return each year to lay their eggs. But there is trouble in paradise for these reptiles, namely, from egg thieves.

Comments Off on Costa Rica Has a Sea Turtle Egg-Poaching Problem

Deep Sea Mining Gold Rush Moves Closer

The prospect of a deep sea “gold rush” opening a controversial new frontier for mining on the ocean floor has moved a step closer.

Comments Off on Deep Sea Mining Gold Rush Moves Closer

Oyster Shells Are an Antacid to the Oceans

By studying oyster populations in relation to acidity levels, a team of researchers has concluded that oysters, particularly their shells, can play a significant role in reducing the increasing ocean’s acidity…

Comments Off on Oyster Shells Are an Antacid to the Oceans

Mercury Pollution Threatens Arctic Foxes

New scientific results show that arctic foxes accumulate dangerous levels of mercury if they live in coastal habitats and feed on prey which lives in the ocean.

Comments Off on Mercury Pollution Threatens Arctic Foxes

Arctic Ocean Acidifying Rapidly

The Arctic seas are being made rapidly more acidic by carbon-dioxide emissions, according to a new report, by the scientists from the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP).

Comments Off on Arctic Ocean Acidifying Rapidly

Boom in Jellyfish: Overfishing Called Into Question

Will we soon be forced to eat jellyfish? Since the beginning of the 2000s, these gelatinous creatures have invaded many of the world’s seas, like the Japan Sea, the Black Sea, the Mediterranean Sea, etc…

Comments Off on Boom in Jellyfish: Overfishing Called Into Question

Puerto Rico Leatherback Turtle Nesting Site, Receives Protection

Puerto Rico’s governor has signed a law to protect a swath of land along the island’s northeast coast that is a top U.S. nesting site for the world’s largest turtle species.

Comments Off on Puerto Rico Leatherback Turtle Nesting Site, Receives Protection

Australia To Face Japan Over Whaling In UN Court

The UN’s International Court of Justice has set dates for public hearings on Australia’s challenge against Japan’s whaling programme in Antarctica.

Comments Off on Australia To Face Japan Over Whaling In UN Court