Ecosystem Destruction

Massive sand tubes being constructed in Walton County, Florida Massive sand tubes being constructed in Walton County, Florida under the ecologically-appealing euphemism of "dune enhancement devices." Photo: Gary Appleson, Caribbean Conservation Corporation.

A variety of threatened or endangered organisms use the beach as a vital part of their life cycle. The nearshore ecosystem extends from the meiofauna that exist between sand grains to the carnivorous fish that roam the surf zone.

Components include birds that feed and nest on the beach such as the piping plover (US east coast) and various turtles that lay their eggs here. The first steps in protecting birds, turtle nests and the rest of this ecosystem must be the protection of a natural, un-engineered beach.

Another major threat to beach ecosystems around the world is the ever increasing human population in coastal areas. The global migration of people towards the coast causes competition between humans and other species and humans usually negatively impact other species. New construction in coastal communities destroys beach ecosystems with every parking lot paved, road expanded, or sand dune lost. This increase also puts a burden on sanitation systems, transportation networks, and increases pollution in these diverse ecosystems.


Surfing in / Ecosystem Destruction

Water Flows and Coastal Ecosytems

One of biggest factors promoting the diversity of coastal ocean life is how fast the water flows, according to new research by scientists at Brown University.

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Enormous Levels of Illegal Turtle Harvesting on Beaches, Madagascar

The study is the first direct assessment of the level of exploitation of turtles in Madagascar. Similar harvests exist in many countries in the tropical coastal developing world, so this isn’t an isolated issue, but clearly it is a cause for concern when dealing with endangered species.

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Where’s the Gulf oil? In the Coastal Planktonic Food Web, Study Says

The eye-opening speed of how the oil components moved through the ecosystem may affect the overall health of the Gulf and beyond.

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Plastic debris killing Adriatic loggerhead turtles

The shallow coastal waters of the northern Adriatic are one of the most important feeding grounds for loggerhead turtles in the Mediterranean. The concentration of litter on the sea floor is among the highest along European coasts, after the northwestern Mediterranean and the Celtic Sea.

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Potentially devastating impacts of major coastal developments, Australia

100 major coastal developments were proposed for the Queensland coast, with potentially devastating impacts.

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Costa Rica Recognized for Biodiversity Protection

“We are declaring peace with nature,” said Mario Fernández Silva, the ambassador of Costa Rica. The nation wins 2010 Future Policy award for pioneering legal protection of natural wealth. The EU and Canada lead the way to extinction, with China and Brazil close behind,” noted the CBD Alliance.

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Protection of Coastal Marine Ecosystems in Sub-Saharan Africa

East Africa’s increasing poverty may call upon adopting different conservation strategies to western models and approaches, in order to integrate efficient coastal management without, inadvertently, alienating Africa’s own people.

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Savagery without Borders: Whaling: When the sands turns from white to blood red in the bays

Japanese police have launched a probe after nets on holding pens for dolphins in the coastal town of Taiji were cut during an annual hunt.

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New Plan to Save Mediterranean Ecosystem

The Mediterranean Basin is home to nearly half a billion people and visited by more than 220 million tourists each year. The Plan covers 34 countries with numerous different languages, alphabets, cultures and religions.

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