Category Archives: Mangrove and Coral Destruction

Everglades mangroves might hold billion-dollar fix for climate change

mangrove-roots-coastalcare
Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

The price of fighting climate change in South Florida has so far focused largely on the billions needed to install pumps, raise roads and retrofit the sprawling infrastructure that keeps the region above sea level. But South Florida might already have a valuable weapon that for ages has been sucking up carbon and keeping the planet cool: mangrove wetlands in the Everglades…

Read Full Article, Miami Herald (11-25-2016)

Destruction of Mangroves Costs up to US$42 billion in Economic Damages Annually – UNEP Report (10-14-2014)
The world is losing its mangroves at a faster rate than global deforestation, the United Nations revealed, in a new report “Importance of Mangroves: A Call to Action,” adding that the destruction of the coastal habitats was costing billions in economic damages and impacting millions of lives…

Let mangroves recover to protect coasts; BBC News (09-17-2016)
Allowing mangrove forests to recover naturally result in more resilient habitats that benefit both wildlife and people, say conservationists…

Mangroves Help Protect Against Sea Level Rise, Science Daily (07-27-2015)
Mangrove forests could play a crucial role in protecting coastal areas from sea level rise caused by climate change, according to new research involving the University of Southampton…

The World Must Invest In Mangroves, The Ecologist (04-11-2014)

Sri Lanka to become the first nation in the world to protect all its mangroves; Guardian UK (05-12-2015)
More than half the world’s mangroves have been lost over the last century but all of those surviving in Sri Lanka, one of their most important havens, are now to be protected in an unprecedented operation…

Great Barrier Reef suffered worst bleaching on record in 2016

coeur-barriere-corail-australie
The Great Barrier Reef extends for 2,000 kilometers along the northeastern coast of Australia. It is not a single reef, but a vast maze of reefs, passages, and coral cays. Photo source: ©© jamestee

Excerpts;

Higher water temperatures in 2016 caused the worst destruction of corals ever recorded on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, a study has found.

Some 67% of corals died in the reef’s worst-hit northern section, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies report said…

Read Full Article, BBC News (11-28-2016)

The Great Barrier Reef: a catastrophe laid bare; Guardian UK (06-07-2016)
Australia’s natural wonder is in mortal danger. Bleaching caused by climate change has killed almost a quarter of its coral this year and many scientists believe it could be too late for the rest. Using photographs and new data, a Guardian special report investigates how the reef has been devastated – and what can be done to save it…

Great Barrier Reef: the scale of bleaching has the most sober scientists worried, Guardian UK (04-16-2016)
I have dived hundreds of times, with different teams of scientists, along the reef. Yet the scale of this bleaching event has even the most sober and senior coral reef scientists worried. If the rhetoric from marine biologists is to be believed, then the Great Barrier Reef is now in the grip of a “bommie apocalypse”…

Coral bleaching hits 93% of Great Barrier Reef, Video, Science Daily (04-21-2016)
Australia’s Great Barrier Reef is suffering its worst coral bleaching in recorded history with 93 percent of the World Heritage site affected, scientists say as they reveal the phenomenon is also hitting the other side of the country…

Great Barrier Reef coral bleaching hits “extreme level”, CBC News (04-04-2016)
Coral bleaching, a phenomenon that can result in the widespread die-off of coral life, is a serious problem facing the world’s oceans, and according to a new aerial survey of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, 95 percent of the reef’s northern section is now bleached, Australian Broadcasting Corporation reports…

Scientists: Major Coral Bleaching Crisis Spreads Worldwide, AP / US News & World Report (10-08-2015)
The bleaching of colorful coral is spreading into a worldwide, devastating crisis, scientists say, and they predict it will likely get worse…

Mangrove protection key to survival for Senegalese community

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Mangrove, Joal, Senegal. Photo source: ©© Salvatore Soi

Excerpts;

Senegal has lost 40 percent of its mangroves since the 1970s. Mangroves are being eroded by a combination of factors, including global warming, deforestation, public works, oyster and clam fishing, salination of the fresh water river and drought.

The establishment of the 174-square-kilometre (67-square-mile) protected area has had a positive effect on safeguarding the local environment…

Read Full Article, Daily Mail UK (11-06-2016)

Gambia: Mangrove Regeneration and Coastal Erosion; All’Africa (12-02-2014)

Fishing communities in Kenya’s South Coast, net cash and more fish from protecting mangroves, The Star (10-29-2016)

Tanzania: Mangrove Project Bears Fruit; All’Africa (07-17-2016)

Sri Lanka to become the first nation in the world to protect all its mangroves; Guardian UK (05-12-2015)
More than half the world’s mangroves have been lost over the last century but all of those surviving in Sri Lanka, one of their most important havens, are now to be protected in an unprecedented operation…

Let mangroves recover to protect coasts; BBC News (09-17-2016)
Allowing mangrove forests to recover naturally result in more resilient habitats that benefit both wildlife and people, say conservationists…

Destruction of Mangroves Costs up to US$42 billion in Economic Damages Annually – UNEP Report (10-14-2014)
The world is losing its mangroves at a faster rate than global deforestation, the United Nations revealed, in a new report “Importance of Mangroves: A Call to Action,” adding that the destruction of the coastal habitats was costing billions in economic damages and impacting millions of lives…

Mangroves Help Protect Against Sea Level Rise, Science Daily (07-27-2015)
Mangrove forests could play a crucial role in protecting coastal areas from sea level rise caused by climate change, according to new research involving the University of Southampton…

West Africa Is Being Swallowed by the Sea, FP (10-21-2016)

Preserving Mangroves Provides Protection and Food Security, IPS News (11-16-2015)

The World Must Invest In Mangroves, The Ecologist (04-11-2014)

Making Local People Stewards of the Earth; IPS News (09-23-2013)

In Myanmar’s Irrawaddy Delta, a rapidly disintegrating mangrove forest

irrawaddy-delta
The Ayeyarwady Delta, also called the Irrawaddy Delta, Myanmar and Meinmahla Kuhn Wildlife sanctuary. Landsat image taken January 29th, 2014.
Mangrove forests appear bright green in the Landsat images. Their degradation is evident in the reduction of the green color throughout the series. One island remains bright green amid the deforestation. That’s the Meinmahla Kyun Wildlife Sanctuary, which was established in 1986. As guardians of the shoreline, mangroves reduce the impacts from storms and tsunamis. Their dense and partially submerged root system protects inland areas from erosion and flooding. Mangrove ecosystems have a global benefit, too. Worldwide, mangroves sequester an estimated 22.8 to 25.5 million metric tons of carbon each year. A mangrove region as extensive as the Ayeyarwady Delta is well worth monitoring. Captions and image source: USGS

Excerpts;

Meinmahla wildlife sanctuary, established in 1986, is an area known for its diverse mangrove tree species and saltwater crocodiles. However, it has been described as one the most degraded mangrove systems or national parks many researchers have ever seen…

Read Full Article, Mongabay News (10-22-2016)

Fishing communities in Kenya’s South Coast, net cash and more fish from protecting mangroves

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Mangrove roots. Photo source: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

Besides protecting mangrove forests themselves, the effort aims to improve local fisheries, as many fish species breed and raise their young in shoreline mangroves, and build resilience to worsening storm surges and coastal erosion, which can be slowed by mangroves.

Mangrove forests can also help regulate coastal rainfall, ensuring supplies of water.

But mangrove forests are also particularly effective at absorbing carbon dioxide, one of the major drivers of climate change…

Read Full Article, The Star (10-29-2016)

Coastal Kenyan villages bringing their mangrove forest back to life, Guardian UK (02-24-2016)
A community on Kenya’s east coast is fighting climate change with its own mangrove restoration, conservation and carbon-trading project…

Tanzania: Mangrove Project Bears Fruit; All’Africa (07-17-2016)

Sri Lanka to become the first nation in the world to protect all its mangroves; Guardian UK (05-12-2015)
More than half the world’s mangroves have been lost over the last century but all of those surviving in Sri Lanka, one of their most important havens, are now to be protected in an unprecedented operation…

Let mangroves recover to protect coasts; BBC News (09-17-2016)
Allowing mangrove forests to recover naturally result in more resilient habitats that benefit both wildlife and people, say conservationists…

Destruction of Mangroves Costs up to US$42 billion in Economic Damages Annually – UNEP Report (10-14-2014)
The world is losing its mangroves at a faster rate than global deforestation, the United Nations revealed, in a new report “Importance of Mangroves: A Call to Action,” adding that the destruction of the coastal habitats was costing billions in economic damages and impacting millions of lives…

Mangroves Help Protect Against Sea Level Rise, Science Daily (07-27-2015)
Mangrove forests could play a crucial role in protecting coastal areas from sea level rise caused by climate change, according to new research involving the University of Southampton…

Preserving Mangroves Provides Protection and Food Security, IPS News (11-16-2015)

The World Must Invest In Mangroves, The Ecologist (04-11-2014)

Making Local People Stewards of the Earth; IPS News (09-23-2013)

Northern prawn fleet seek answer on unexplained mass mangrove dieback in Gulf of Carpentaria

mangrove-queensland
Mangrove tree. Photo source: ©© Mark Wassell

Excerpts;

Austral Fisheries chief executive officer is questioning why more is not being done to explain a mass mangrove dieback event in the Gulf of Carpentaria, in northern Australia…

Read Full Article, ABC News Australia (10-10-2016)

Queensland’s mangrove ecosystem dying in secret; Brisbane Times (05-20-2016)

Mangroves die-off in Queensland’s Gulf Country and Limmen Bight, ABC News Australia (05-13-2016)
Experts have been focusing on hundreds of kilometres of mangroves along the coast in Queensland, that have turned a ghostly white. Serious concerns about the situation, which is compared to coral bleaching happening on the Great Barrier Reef, which is the result of warmer ocean temperatures, are raised…

Destruction of Mangroves Costs up to US$42 billion in Economic Damages Annually – UNEP Report (10-14-2014)
The world is losing its mangroves at a faster rate than global deforestation, the United Nations revealed, in a new report “Importance of Mangroves: A Call to Action,” adding that the destruction of the coastal habitats was costing billions in economic damages and impacting millions of lives…

People Power Wins: Super Trawler Banned, Australia, Greenpeace (Uploaded 09-12-2012)

Overfishing is as big a threat to humanity as it is to our oceans; Guardian UK (02-16-2016)
There has never been a more urgent time for seafood businesses and fishing nations to make a commitment to sustainability. The world’s oceans are in trouble, with marine life plummeting and the people who are dependent on the sea for income and food left increasingly vulnerable…

Organic shrimp farmers protect mangrove forests; Viêt Nam News (03-06-2016)

Preserving Mangroves Provides Protection and Food Security, IPS News (11-16-2015)
After three years of implementation of the Mangroves and Markets Project (MAM), shrimp farmers have become more aware of organic production techniques and the need to preserve mangrove forests in their areas…

Let mangroves recover to protect coasts

mangrove-coastalcare-2
Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

Allowing mangrove forests to recover naturally result in more resilient habitats that benefit both wildlife and people, say conservationists…

Read Full Article, BBC News (09-17-2016)

Sri Lanka to become the first nation in the world to protect all its mangroves; Guardian UK (05-12-2015)
More than half the world’s mangroves have been lost over the last century but all of those surviving in Sri Lanka, one of their most important havens, are now to be protected in an unprecedented operation…

Destruction of Mangroves Costs up to US$42 billion in Economic Damages Annually – UNEP Report (10-14-2014)
The world is losing its mangroves at a faster rate than global deforestation, the United Nations revealed, in a new report “Importance of Mangroves: A Call to Action,” adding that the destruction of the coastal habitats was costing billions in economic damages and impacting millions of lives…

Facing Storms Without the Mangrove Wall, IPS News (10-15-2014)
While tropical cyclones and storms cannot be stopped in their tracks, there is a natural defense system against their more savage impacts: mangroves. And experts fear their tremendous value is being woefully under-appreciated, to tragic effect, all around the world..

The World Must Invest In Mangroves, The Ecologist (04-11-2014)

Can killer robots save ocean ecosystems?

lionfish-close-up
Lionfish. Photo source: ©© Peter Miller

Excerpts;

Few predators can match the devastating impact of the lionfish.

Since arriving in US waters in the 1980s, these fearsome creatures have left a trail of destruction along the Atlantic Coast, from Rhode Island to Venezuela. Lionfish can reduce a flourishing coral reef to barren wasteland in a matter of weeks…

Read Full Article, CNN (09-18-2016)

Lionfish Decimating Caribbean Reefs; IPS News (02-28-2014)
A recent scientific paper brought new detail to previous studies, showing that a year after colonising a reef, lionfish reduced the number of native fish by about half. The lionfish, believed to have been introduced to the Atlantic coast by aquarium lovers in the 1980s, will likely wipe out most Caribbean reef fish in a decade or two…