Category Archives: Inform

Unprecedented and worrying rise in sea levels

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Indian Ocean. Photograph courtesy of: © Isabelle Duflo

Excerpts;

A new study has discovered new evidence of sea-level variability in the central Indian Ocean.

The study, which provides new details about sea levels in the past, concludes that sea levels in the central Indian Ocean have risen by close to a meter in the last two centuries…

Read Full Article; Science Daily (12-23-2019)

Global mineral sand market report to share key aspects of the industry with the details of influence factors

sand-mining-coastal-care
Illegal beach sand mining. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care
As of 2011-2012, when investigative filmmaker Denis Delestrac and team, were first collecting and unveiling sand mining datas and information from the professionals involved, the Sand business was estimated to be a $70 billion industry, worldwide…!—Denis Delestrac (©-2013)
Sand is the second most consumed natural resource, after water. The construction-building industry is by far the largest consumer of this finite resource. The traditional building of one average-sized house requires 200 tons of sand; a hospital requires 3,000 tons of sand; each kilometer of highway built requires 30,000 tons of sand… A nuclear plant, a staggering 12 million tons of sand…”
All captions by: “Sand Wars” Multi Award-Winning Filmmaker Denis Delestrac (©-2013).

Excerpts;

Mineral sand is old beach sand that contains concentrations of key minerals such as rutile, ilmenite, zircon, and monazite. These minerals are heavy and are known as heavy minerals.

Based on end-user industry, the market can be classified into building & construction, paints & coatings, metal & mining, and others. The building & construction segment is projected to expand at a rapid pace during the forecast period…

Read Full Article; Market Report Observer(12-23-2019)

Concrete, or Beaches? World’s Sand Running Out As Global Construction Booms; The Ecologist (05-09-2017)

The Economist explains: Why there is a shortage of sand; The Economist (04-24-2017)
It may be plentiful, but so is the demand for it…

A microscopic look at why the world is running out of sand; Video; The Verge (09-04-2018)

Sand, Rarer Than One Thinks: A UNEP report (GEA-March 2014)
Despite the colossal quantities of sand and gravel being used, our increasing dependence on them and the significant impact that their extraction has on the environment, this issue has been mostly ignored by policy makers and remains largely unknown by the general public.
In March 2014 The United Nations released its first Report about sand mining. “Sand Wars” investigative film by Denis Delestrac – first broadcasted on the european Arte Channel, May 28th, 2013, where it became the highest rated documentary for 2013 – expressly inspired the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to publish this 2014-Global Environmental Alert.

Sand Is in Such High Demand, People Are Stealing Tons of It, By Dave Roos; HowStuffWorks (03-06-2017)
As strange as it may sound, sand is one of the world’s hottest commodities. The global construction boom has created an insatiable appetite for sand, the chief ingredient for making concrete. The problem is that sand isn’t as abundant as it used to be. And when high demand and high value meets scarcity, you open the doors to smuggling…

The Conservation Crisis No One Is Talking About, TakePart (09-21-2016)
Beaches around the world are disappearing. No, the cause isn’t sea-level rise, at least not this time. It’s a little-known but enormous industry called sand mining, which every year sucks up billions of tons of sand from beaches, ocean floors, and rivers to make everything from concrete to microchips to toothpaste…

Sand Wars, An Investigation Documentary, By Multi Award-Winning Filmmaker Denis Delestrac (©-2013)
Is sand an infinite resource? Can the existing supply satisfy a gigantic demand fueled by construction booms? What are the consequences of intensive beach sand mining for the environment and the neighboring populations…? This investigative documentary takes us around the globe to unveil a new gold rush and a disturbing fact: the “Sand Wars” have begun…

Global Sand Mining: Learn More, Coastal Care


BE THE CHANGE:

PETITION: Take Action To End Global Beach Sand Mining, Coastal Care


Illegal beach and dune sand mining operations, near Tangier, Morocco. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Ghana: Sand mining threatens coastal tourism in Central Region

ghana-kita
Severe coastal erosion, Keta, Ghana.
Ghana is undergoing much erosion. Photo source: ©© Beth Knittle
“Sand is the second most consumed natural resource, after water. The construction-building industry is by far the largest consumer of this finite resource, followed by the land reclamation industry. The Sand business has been estimated to be a $70 billion industry, worldwide…”Captions by: “Sand Wars” Multi Award-Winning Filmmaker Denis Delestrac (©-2013).

Excerpts;

Ghana’s 168,000-kilometres of Atlantic ocean (Gulf of Guinea) is undulated with batholiths as a dominant feature with stretches of sandy beaches intermittently separated by cliffs or rock outcrops. In between the hills are valleys of various shapes, some occupied by rivers and streams including the famous Kakum river.

However, intensive activities of illegal sand miners at its coastline has exposed tourist facilities and other national edifices to the ravages of the sea…

Read Full Article; Modern Ghana (12-20-2019)

Jobless Cape Coast youth venture into illegal beach sand winning; Ghana News (05-22-2018)

A Photo Gallery: “We Were Once Three Miles From the Sea” (01-03-2014)
Grain by grain, West Africa’s coasts are eroding away, the dry land sucked under the water by a destructive mix of natural erosion and human meddling. Nyani Quarmyne has poignantly photographed the impacts of climate change on people living on the Ghana coast…

The Market For African Beach Sand: Who’s Buying, Selling And Mining It? AFK Insider (02-17-2017)

Sand mining: The Greatest Threat To The Coastline of Ghana, Graphic Online (04-24-2014)

Ghana’s Ongoing Battle Against Coastal erosion (09-09-2011)
According to estimates, the ocean claims 1.5 to 2 metres of the 539- kilometres Ghana coastline annually; with the most risky coastal areas, Ada Foah and the Eastern parts of Keta, recording 4 metres. Ghana’s Government decided on a costly and controversial project: the building of a 68 million euros, 30 kms “Ada Defense Sea Wall” to “salvage the people in the area from the ravages of the sea…”

The Ecological Effects of Beach Sand Mining in Ghana Using Ghost Crabs as Biological Indicators; Science Direct(05-28-2015)

Sand, Rarer Than One Thinks: A UNEP report (GEA-March 2014)
Despite the colossal quantities of sand and gravel being used, our increasing dependence on them and the significant impact that their extraction has on the environment, this issue has been mostly ignored by policy makers and remains largely unknown by the general public.
In March 2014 The United Nations released its first Report about sand mining. “Sand Wars” film documentary by Denis Delestrac – first broadcasted on the european Arte Channel, May 28th, 2013, where it became the highest rated documentary for 2013 – expressly inspired the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to publish this 2014-Global Environmental Alert.

The Conservation Crisis No One Is Talking About, TakePart (09-21-2016)
Beaches around the world are disappearing. No, the cause isn’t sea-level rise, at least not this time. It’s a little-known but enormous industry called sand mining, which every year sucks up billions of tons of sand from beaches, ocean floors, and rivers to make everything from concrete to microchips to toothpaste…

Sand Wars, An Investigation Documentary, By Award-Winning Filmmaker Denis Delestrac (©-2013)
Is sand an infinite resource? Can the existing supply satisfy a gigantic demand fueled by construction booms? What are the consequences of intensive beach sand mining for the environment and the neighboring populations…? This investigative documentary takes us around the globe to unveil a new gold rush and a disturbing fact: the “Sand Wars” have begun…

Global Sand Mining: Learn More, Coastal Care

The plastics pipeline: a surge of new production is on the way


Plastic pollution. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care.
“The unprecedented plastic waste tide plaguing our oceans and shores, can become as limited as our chosen relationship with plastics, which involves a dramatic behavioral change on our part…”
— Claire Le Guern, author of “When The Mermaids Cry: The Great Plastic Tide” ©.

Excerpts;

A world awash in plastic will soon see even more, as a host of new petrochemical plants — their ethane feedstock supplied by the fracking boom — come online.

Major oil companies, facing the prospect of reduced demand for their fuels, are ramping up their plastics output…

Read Full Article; YALE E360 (12-11-2019)

Plastic Pollution: “When The Mermaids Cry: The Great Plastic Tide,” Coastal Care
Plastic is versatile, lightweight, flexible, moisture resistant, strong, and relatively inexpensive. Those are the attractive qualities that lead us, around the world, to such a voracious appetite and over-consumption of plastic goods. However, durable and very slow to degrade, plastic materials that are used in the production of so many products all, ultimately, become waste with staying power. Our tremendous attraction to plastic, coupled with an undeniable behavioral propensity of increasingly over-consuming, discarding, littering and thus polluting, has become a combination of lethal nature…

Biodiversity has substantially changed in one of the largest Mediterranean wetlands


Photo source: Henk Kosters

Excerpts;

The Camargue in southern France is widely recognised as one of the largest and most biodiverse wetlands in the Mediterranean region.

Recent research has now shown that grasshoppers, crickets and locusts, comprising orthopterans, and also dragonflies and amphibians have severely declined since the 1970s. This provides evidence of substantial deterioration of the Camargue ecosystem…

Read Full Article; Science Daily (12-19-2019)

Integrating social and ecological science for effective coral reef conservation


Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

While many conservation plans focus on only environmental indicators for success, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)’s coral reef program is trying a relatively new approach: focusing on both social and ecological processes and outcomes to ensure a long-term future for coral reef systems, according to a newly published study…

Read Full Article; Science Daily (12-19-2019)

Beyond Preservation: The Coral Restoration Foundation Bonaire; By Andrew Jalbert (08-01-2018)
When avid scuba diver and famed Jurassic Park author Michael Crichton first visited Bonaire decades ago, he eloquently described the underwater environment as, “a world of riotous, outrageous color.” Years later, Bonaire has seen some changes but his assessment still largely rings true…

North Stradbroke Island: sand mining ends in three weeks?

north-stradbroke
North Stradbroke. Photo source: ©© Conrad Petzsch-Kunze

Excerpts;

The Australian Labor Government passed laws in 2016 to phase out sand mining on the island by the end of 2019…

Read Full Article; ABC News ABC News Australia (12-13-2019)

North Stradbroke Island sand mining to end by 2019; ABC News Australia (05-25-2016)

Newman vows to push ahead with sand mining on North Stradbroke Island, ABC queensland (08-20-2013)
Queensland Premier Campbell Newman says the State Government will press ahead with plans to extend sand mining on North Stradbroke Island to 2035. He was responding to the release of a report that argues sand mining on the island, off Brisbane, should be regulated by federal rather than state environmental laws…

The Government Is Lying About Stradbroke Island Sand Mining, The Sydney Morning Herald (07-15-2014)
The Newman Government has misled the media and the public over its amendments to North Stradbroke Island sand mining legislation…

A line in the Sand: Rebuilding Stradbroke Island After Sand Mining, (04-15-2011)
A line in the sand, that’s what the Queensland State Government is calling its decision to end sand mining on Stradbroke Island in eight years time. An ABC News video, depicting the dilemmas of a sustainable environment and a sustainable economy…

Sand mining ban for North Stradbroke Island, Australia, (06-23-2010)
The ancient dunes of North Stradbroke Island will be saved under a bold new plan to phase out sand mining and convert the ecosensitive tourist playground to a national park. Premier of Queensland, Anna Bligh, just announced that the Government will progressively halt sand mining on North Stradbroke Island by 2027…

Cronulla’s sand dunes survived Mad Max but now face a more insidious threat, Guardian UK (12-28-2015)
The once vast sand dunes in Sydney’s south have been farmed, trimmed down by sandmining, filmed and eroded by wind and rain. Now they face encroaching housing developments.

Sand, Rarer Than One Thinks: A UNEP report (March 2014)

“Sand Wars,” An Investigation Documentary, By Denis Delestrac ©2013

Sand Mining in Australia: Learn More, Coastal Care

Global Sand Mining: Learn More, Coastal Care

Meet the man who swam through the Great Pacific Garbage Patch


Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care
“The unprecedented plastic waste tide plaguing our oceans and shores, can become as limited as our chosen relationship with plastics, which involves a dramatic behavioral change on our part…”
— Claire Le Guern, author of “When The Mermaids Cry: The Great Plastic Tide” ©.

Excerpts;

Ben Lecomte, a long-distance swimmer, swam the Great Pacific Garbage Patch from Hawaii to California to draw attention to plastic pollution. This is his Call to Earth…

Read Full Article; CNN (12-11-2019)

Plastic Pollution: “When The Mermaids Cry: The Great Plastic Tide,” Coastal Care
Plastic is versatile, lightweight, flexible, moisture resistant, strong, and relatively inexpensive. Those are the attractive qualities that lead us, around the world, to such a voracious appetite and over-consumption of plastic goods. However, durable and very slow to degrade, plastic materials that are used in the production of so many products all, ultimately, become waste with staying power. Our tremendous attraction to plastic, coupled with an undeniable behavioral propensity of increasingly over-consuming, discarding, littering and thus polluting, has become a combination of lethal nature…