Category Archives: Sand Mining

Indians at risk of flooding powerless to stem the tide of illegal sand mining

sand-miner-mumbai
Encounter with illegal sand miners, Mumbai, India.
“Sand is the second most consumed natural resource, after water. The construction-building industry is by far the largest consumer of this finite resource. The traditional building of one average-sized house requires 200 tons of sand; a hospital requires 3,000 tons of sand; each kilometer of highway built requires 30,000 tons of sand… A nuclear plant, a staggering 12 million tons of sand…” Captions and Photograph by “Sand Wars” Award-Winning Filmmaker: © Denis Delestrac (2013).

Excerpts;

As rising sea levels threaten to engulf homes along the shores of Tamil Nadu state, locals fear the erosion of the coastline is due to the illegal sand trade…

Read Full Article, Guardian UK (10-10-2016)

Illegal sand mining — the open secret of a multi-million crore scam, India; YourStory (09-19-2016)
India’s booming 157 billion dollar construction sector is expected to grow in the coming years. This means that the demand for sand and other minor minerals will increase as well, making it more difficult for the government to curb the methodical and unlawful abuse of riverbeds and coastal areas…

Tragedy of The Commons: Corrosive Growth of the Illegal Sand Mining Mafia, The Citizen (01-04-2016)
Not many people may know that illegal sand mining is a nationwide phenomena in India, and with spurt in housing and infrastructure projects, the illegal sand mining is thriving beyond the ambit of formal economy and law and order. Sand is everywhere and so is the sand mafia…

India’s ‘New Cities’ Plan: Environment Not Included, Aljazeera (03-06-2015)
Sand – inexpensive and abundant – is a treasure to India’s builders and the construction industry, which employs some 40 million people. But the spike in construction means sand mining, both legal and illegal, will increase in coastal areas, riverbeds, creeks, and rivulets…

The Demand for Sand is so High There are Illegal Sand Mining Operations, The Smithsonian (07-20-2015)

Illegal Sand Mining is New Gold Rush in India, Gulf News (07-23-2013)

India’s beach sand-mining industry set to prosper under private sector (07-14-2016)
With the strangulation of rare earth supplies by China, India’s beach sand-mining industry has received a fillip to develop and expand…

Trimex to invest Rs. 2,500 cr. on beach sand mining, Andhra Pradesh; The Hindu (01-19-2016)
Indian mineral sand producer Trimex Group, will invest Rs. 2,500 crore (373 million USD) on mining beach minerals at Bhavanapadu and Kalingapatnam, two coastal areas of Andhra Pradesh state, located on the southeastern coast of the country. The company proposes the mining of 10 MTPA (10 million tonnes per annum) of heavy mineral sand along with pre-concentration plant of 1,525 tonne per hour…

Sand scarcity hits Mumbai’s first artificial beach project, DNA India (08-22-2016)

People on Coastline Suffering Due to Sand Mining, India; a NEWS X LIVE Video (08-19-2013)

Disappearing Beaches of India, The Hindu (06-06-2015)

Sand, Rarer Than One Thinks: A UNEP report (GEA-March 2014)
Despite the colossal quantities of sand and gravel being used, our increasing dependence on them and the significant impact that their extraction has on the environment, this issue has been mostly ignored by policy makers and remains largely unknown by the general public.
In March 2014 The United Nations released its first Report about sand mining. “Sand Wars” film documentary by Denis Delestrac – first broadcasted on the european Arte Channel, May 28th, 2013, where it became the highest rated documentary for 2013 – expressly inspired the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to publish this 2014-Global Environmental Alert.

Sand Wars, An Investigation Documentary, By Award-Winning Filmmaker Denis Delestrac (2013)

Sand Mining in India: Learn More, Coastal Care

Global Sand Mining: Learn More, Coastal Care

Illegal sand mining — the open secret of a multi-million crore scam, India

sand-miner-mumbai-india
Encounter with an illegal sand miner, Mumbai.
“Sand is the second most consumed natural resource, after water. The construction-building industry is by far the largest consumer of this finite resource. The traditional building of one average-sized house requires 200 tons of sand; a hospital requires 3,000 tons of sand; each kilometer of highway built requires 30,000 tons of sand… A nuclear plant, a staggering 12 million tons of sand…” Captions and Photograph by “Sand Wars” Award-Winning Filmmaker: © Denis Delestrac (2013).

Excerpts;

The city of Mumbai is an ever expanding asphalt jungle, as well as other indian metropolises like Bengaluru, Delhi and Hyderabad, that are witnessing a similar growth in urban infrastructure.

India’s booming 157 billion dollar construction sector is expected to grow in the coming years. This means that the demand for sand and other minor minerals will increase as well, making it more difficult for the government to curb the methodical and unlawful abuse of riverbeds and coastal areas…

Read Full Article, YourStory (09-19-2016)

Tragedy of The Commons: Corrosive Growth of the Illegal Sand Mining Mafia, The Citizen (01-04-2016)
Not many people may know that illegal sand mining is a nationwide phenomena in India, and with spurt in housing and infrastructure projects, the illegal sand mining is thriving beyond the ambit of formal economy and law and order. Sand is everywhere and so is the sand mafia…

India’s ‘New Cities’ Plan: Environment Not Included, Aljazeera (03-06-2015)
Sand – inexpensive and abundant – is a treasure to India’s builders and the construction industry, which employs some 40 million people. But the spike in construction means sand mining, both legal and illegal, will increase in coastal areas, riverbeds, creeks, and rivulets…

The Demand for Sand is so High There are Illegal Sand Mining Operations, The Smithsonian (07-20-2015)

Illegal Sand Mining is New Gold Rush in India, Gulf News (07-23-2013)

India’s beach sand-mining industry set to prosper under private sector (07-14-2016)
With the strangulation of rare earth supplies by China, India’s beach sand-mining industry has received a fillip to develop and expand…

Trimex to invest Rs. 2,500 cr. on beach sand mining, Andhra Pradesh; The Hindu (01-19-2016)
Indian mineral sand producer Trimex Group, will invest Rs. 2,500 crore (373 million USD) on mining beach minerals at Bhavanapadu and Kalingapatnam, two coastal areas of Andhra Pradesh state, located on the southeastern coast of the country. The company proposes the mining of 10 MTPA (10 million tonnes per annum) of heavy mineral sand along with pre-concentration plant of 1,525 tonne per hour…

Sand scarcity hits Mumbai’s first artificial beach project, DNA India (08-22-2016)

People on Coastline Suffering Due to Sand Mining, India; a NEWS X LIVE Video (08-19-2013)

Disappearing Beaches of India, The Hindu (06-06-2015)

Sand, Rarer Than One Thinks: A UNEP report (GEA-March 2014)
Despite the colossal quantities of sand and gravel being used, our increasing dependence on them and the significant impact that their extraction has on the environment, this issue has been mostly ignored by policy makers and remains largely unknown by the general public.
In March 2014 The United Nations released its first Report about sand mining. “Sand Wars” film documentary by Denis Delestrac – first broadcasted on the european Arte Channel, May 28th, 2013, where it became the highest rated documentary for 2013 – expressly inspired the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to publish this 2014-Global Environmental Alert.

Sand Wars, An Investigation Documentary, By Award-Winning Filmmaker Denis Delestrac (2013)

Sand Mining in India: Learn More, Coastal Care

Global Sand Mining: Learn More, Coastal Care

Belgium is to build its first artificial island off the coast, as climate change mitigation

knokke-le-zoute
Knokke Le Zoute Beach, Belgium. Photo source: ©© Zaldy Camerino

Excerpts;

Pour se protéger de la montée des eaux, la Belgique envisage de construire son premier îlot maritime, pour protéger la côte des tempêtes et de la montée des eaux. Pour cette étude de projet, la Flandre a dégagé 8 millions d’euros.

L’objectif, maintenir la station balnéaire Knokke-Heist en sécurité jusqu’en 2100, pour qu’elle continue à offrir des «conditions économiques attrayantes et de l’énergie renouvelable»…

Read Full Article, Face au réchauffement climatique, la Belgique veut construire une île; Le Figaro (10-04-2016)

Translation:
Amid rising seas, Belgium plans on building a first artificial island off its coast, in a step towards climate change mitigation. 8 millions euros have been provided in funding of the project study.
The object, originally initiated by a private investor – Vlaamse Baalen – aims to protect the famous and economically vital tourism area of Knokke-Heist, from the North Sea rising, at least until 2100.
The first step in the island construction is set for 2020, where sand will poured in 1.2km off Knokke-Heist beaches, to build a 40 hectares area, set to be increased up to 450 hectares.
The Belgian Tourism Minister, announced that this artificial island will becomes either a marine reserve, or a seaport.
This controversial project is met by criticisms, specifically from local authorities, allegedly not consulted on such a project.

Belgium reveals artificial island plan for wind energy; PhysOrg (01-20-2013)

Dutch Unveil Plan In War Against The Sea: A Sandbar, AFP / TerraDaily (12-20-2011)
In its age-old war to keep back the sea, low-lying Netherlands has dumped sand onto a surface larger than 200 football fields just off the coast, and will wait for nature to do the rest…

a class=”readmore” href=”http://www.sandandgravel.com/news/article.asp?v1=23203″> The Netherlands: Sand Motor conference to take place in September; Dredging News Online (08-09-2016)
Five years after the creation of the Sand Motor, the initial research results from this pilot project will be presented with respect to coastal safety, innovation, nature and recreation. It will be the central focus of a two-day international conference…

Sand, Rarer Than One Thinks: A UNEP report (GEA-March 2014)
Despite the colossal quantities of sand and gravel being used, our increasing dependence on them and the significant impact that their extraction has on the environment, this issue has been mostly ignored by policy makers and remains largely unknown by the general public.
In March 2014 The United Nations released its first Report about sand mining. “Sand Wars” film documentary by Denis Delestrac – first broadcasted on the european Arte Channel, May 28th, 2013, where it became the highest rated documentary for 2013 – expressly inspired the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to publish this 2014-Global Environmental Alert.

Money and sand: will there be enough for New Jersey’s beaches?

dredging-ry
Palm Beach Mid-Town dredge project, Florida, 1-25-2015. Image source: Youtube
“Beach nourishment projects like this have become commonplace along the US East and Gulf Coasts. These projects have immediate environmental impacts through burial of nearshore habitat and increased turbidity during project placement.The cumulative environmental impacts of doing this repeatedly on the same beach while conducting projects from Maine to Texas is unknown. But, we should be concerned. ” —Robert S. Young, PhD, Director, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, Professor, Coastal Geology, Western Carolina University.

Excerpts;

Beach replenishment is costly and exacts a heavy toll on the environment, depleting underwater ridges that are home to a broad variety of sea life…

Skeptics questioned how the state and Army Corps of Engineers can commit to spending nearly $2 billion in beach replenishment through the mid 21st century.

Read Full Article, NJ Spotlight (09-29-2016)

The Jersey Shore’s Unquenchable Thirst for Sand; Philly (03-09-2015)
New Jersey, with its 127-mile coastline, has spent about $800 million on beach replenishment over the last 30 years – more than any other state, including Florida, which has an 1,800-mile coastline. That is equivalent to 80 million cubic yards of sand – or about a dump truck load for every foot of beach…

Beach replenishment may have far reaching impacts on ecosystems;” Phys.Org (03-29-2016)
UC San Diego biologists who examined the biological impact of replenishing eroded beaches with offshore sand found that such beach replenishment efforts could have long-term negative impacts on coastal ecosystems…

Marine life dwindles after beach renourishment at Folly Beach, SC, The State (08-20-2016)

Coastal geologist criticizes beach renourishment efforts; The State (08-16-2016)

A Beach Project Built on Sand; By Robert S. Young, PhD; The New York Times (08-22-2014)
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo announced a $207 million plan to dredge millions of tons of sand off the south shore of Long Island and spread it along the beaches and dunes. It is a colossal waste of money and another consequence of the nation’s failure to develop a coherent plan to address the risks from storms faced by states along the eastern seaboard and gulf coast…

Is Beach Renourishment Worth The Money? WWAY News (02-16-2015)

Economy Winner, Environment Loser in Renourishment; Pensacola News Journal (12-02-2015)

Piling sand to stop erosion ultimately made the land sink, study says, NOLA (12-26-2015)

Editorial: Beach Replenishment is No Cure-All, Asburry Park Press (05-14-2015)

How Your Taxes Help Inflate The Value Of Coastal Properties Threatened By Climate Change; ThinkProgress (06-05-2015)

Waikiki Beach Eroding Less Than A Year After $2.2M Sand Restoration, Pacific Business News (01-24-2013)

“Engineering away our natural defenses: An analysis of shoreline hardening in the US,” A Study by By Rachel K. Pittman, ResearchGate (08-08-2015)
Rapid coastal population growth and development are primary drivers of marine habitat degradation. Although shoreline hardening, a byproduct of development, can accelerate erosion and loss of beaches and tidal wetlands, it is a common practice globally. 22,842 km of continental U.S. shoreline, 14% of the total, has been hardened…

Coastal erosion needs our attention, South Coast Today (01-04-2016)

Living shorelines a more natural approach to preventing coastal erosion; (05-18-2016)
For centuries, large bulkheads have been used to help control erosion along coastlines. More recent research suggests that a natural approach may be a better alternative. Having nature on your side, especially during a storm or hurricane, is proven to provide better protection from coastal erosion…

Rethinking Living Shorelines, By Orrin H. Pilkey, Rob Young, Norma Longo, and Andy Coburn;Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines / Western Carolina University, March 1, 2012, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University
In response to the detrimental environmental impacts caused by traditional erosion control structures, environmental groups, state and federal resource management agencies, now advocate an approach known as “Living Shorelines”that embraces the use of natural habitat elements such as indigenous vegetation, to stabilize and protect eroding shorelines.

Why Paris beach festival could be sand-free in future

paris-plage
Paris plage. Photo source: ©© Gwenael Piaser

Excerpts;

The man-made, hugely popular summer Paris-Plages beaches along the Seine River, could be without sand next year, after complaints about the project’s disastrous ecological footprint and allegations that the company delivering the sand had “paid taxes” to Isis…

Read Full Article, “Paris-Plages may say au revoir to sand over complaints provider ‘paid taxes to Isil’ and environmental concerns,” Telegraph UK (09-28-2016)

Why Paris beach festival could be sand-free in future; The Local (09-28-2016)

The Conservation Crisis No One Is Talking About, TakePart (09-21-2016)
Beaches around the world are disappearing. No, the cause isn’t sea-level rise, at least not this time. It’s a little-known but enormous industry called sand mining, which every year sucks up billions of tons of sand from beaches, ocean floors, and rivers to make everything from concrete to microchips to toothpaste…

Sand, Rarer Than One Thinks: A UNEP report (GEA-March 2014)
Despite the colossal quantities of sand and gravel being used, our increasing dependence on them and the significant impact that their extraction has on the environment, this issue has been mostly ignored by policy makers and remains largely unknown by the general public.
In March 2014 The United Nations released its first Report about sand mining. “Sand Wars” film documentary by Denis Delestrac – first broadcasted on the european Arte Channel, May 28th, 2013, where it became the highest rated documentary for 2013 – expressly inspired the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to publish this 2014-Global Environmental Alert.

Sand Wars, An Investigation Documentary, By Award-Winning Filmmaker Denis Delestrac (©-2013)
Is beach sand an infinite resource? Can the existing supply satisfy a gigantic demand fueled by construction booms? What are the consequences of intensive beach sand mining for the environment and the neighboring populations…? This investigation takes us around the globe to unveil a new gold rush…

Sand Thieves Are Eroding World’s Beaches For Castles Of Cash, by Martine Valo, Le Monde (09-2013)
The pillaging of sand is a growing practice in the world. This is because it represents 80% of the composition of concrete that it is the object of such greed…

Learn more on beach sand mining, Coastal Care

Coastal Sand is Being Depleted, and It’s Taking Our Beaches With It

beach-sand-mining
Beach sand mining. Photograph: © Santa Aguila Foundation — Coastal Care.

Excerpts;

While conservationists champion the reduction of the world’s resources, one important material right at our toes has gone largely unnoticed.

Coastal sands are being heavily mined, diminishing the world’s beaches…

Read Full Article, Weather Channel (09-22-2016)

The Conservation Crisis No One Is Talking About, TakePart (09-21-2016)
Beaches around the world are disappearing. No, the cause isn’t sea-level rise, at least not this time. It’s a little-known but enormous industry called sand mining, which every year sucks up billions of tons of sand from beaches, ocean floors, and rivers to make everything from concrete to microchips to toothpaste…

Sand, Rarer Than One Thinks: A UNEP report (GEA-March 2014)
Despite the colossal quantities of sand and gravel being used, our increasing dependence on them and the significant impact that their extraction has on the environment, this issue has been mostly ignored by policy makers and remains largely unknown by the general public.
In March 2014 The United Nations released its first Report about sand mining. “Sand Wars” film documentary by Denis Delestrac – first broadcasted on the european Arte Channel, May 28th, 2013, where it became the highest rated documentary for 2013 – expressly inspired the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to publish this 2014-Global Environmental Alert.

Sand Wars, An Investigation Documentary, By Award-Winning Filmmaker Denis Delestrac (©-2013)
Is beach sand an infinite resource? Can the existing supply satisfy a gigantic demand fueled by construction booms? What are the consequences of intensive beach sand mining for the environment and the neighboring populations…? This investigation takes us around the globe to unveil a new gold rush and a disturbing fact: the “Sand Wars” have begun…

Cemex mine reflects human hunger for sand, California; Monterey County Now (01-14-2016)
The disappearance of the beach reflects an alarming reality: Southern Monterey Bay, Marina in particular, has the highest coastal erosion rate in the state of California. For more than 20 years, scientists have speculated about the sand mine’s contribution to that erosion rate, and a 2008 study concluded it was the primary cause. The Cemex mine in Marina is the only remaining coastal sand mine in the entire United States. Which leads to new questions…

Monterey Bay, California: Beach Sand Mining from a National Marine Sanctuary; By Gary Griggs (09-01-2014)
The 30-mile long, continuous sandy shoreline around Monterey Bay is the most visited stretch of shoreline on the central coast. Yet, it holds the dubious distinction of being the only active beach sand mining operation along the entire United States shoreline. To make matters even worse, it all takes place along the shoreline of a protected National Marine Sanctuary. Something is seriously wrong with this picture…

Sand Thieves Are Eroding World’s Beaches For Castles Of Cash, by Martine Valo, Le Monde (09-2013)
The pillaging of sand is a growing practice in the world. This is because it represents 80% of the composition of concrete that it is the object of such greed…

Learn more on beach sand mining, Coastal Care

The Conservation Crisis No One Is Talking About

illegal-sand-mining-coastal-care
Beach sand mining. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care.

Excerpts;

Beaches around the world are disappearing.

No, the cause isn’t sea-level rise, at least not this time. It’s a little-known but enormous industry called sand mining, which every year sucks up billions of tons of sand from beaches, ocean floors, and rivers to make everything from concrete to microchips to toothpaste…

Read Full Article, By John R. Platt / TakePart (09-21-2016)

Sand, Rarer Than One Thinks: A UNEP report (GEA-March 2014)
Despite the colossal quantities of sand and gravel being used, our increasing dependence on them and the significant impact that their extraction has on the environment, this issue has been mostly ignored by policy makers and remains largely unknown by the general public.
In March 2014 The United Nations released its first Report about sand mining. “Sand Wars” film documentary by Denis Delestrac – first broadcasted on the european Arte Channel, May 28th, 2013, where it became the highest rated documentary for 2013 – expressly inspired the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to publish this 2014-Global Environmental Alert.

Sand Wars, An Investigation Documentary, By Award-Winning Filmmaker Denis Delestrac (©-2013)
Is beach sand an infinite resource? Can the existing supply satisfy a gigantic demand fueled by construction booms? What are the consequences of intensive beach sand mining for the environment and the neighboring populations…? This investigation takes us around the globe to unveil a new gold rush and a disturbing fact: the “Sand Wars” have begun…

Cemex mine reflects human hunger for sand, California; Monterey County Now (01-14-2016)
The disappearance of the beach reflects an alarming reality: Southern Monterey Bay, Marina in particular, has the highest coastal erosion rate in the state of California. For more than 20 years, scientists have speculated about the sand mine’s contribution to that erosion rate, and a 2008 study concluded it was the primary cause. The Cemex mine in Marina is the only remaining coastal sand mine in the entire United States. Which leads to new questions…

Monterey Bay, California: Beach Sand Mining from a National Marine Sanctuary; By Gary Griggs (09-01-2014)
The 30-mile long, continuous sandy shoreline around Monterey Bay is the most visited stretch of shoreline on the central coast. Yet, it holds the dubious distinction of being the only active beach sand mining operation along the entire United States shoreline. To make matters even worse, it all takes place along the shoreline of a protected National Marine Sanctuary. Something is seriously wrong with this picture…

Sand Thieves Are Eroding World’s Beaches For Castles Of Cash, by Martine Valo, Le Monde (09-2013)
The pillaging of sand is a growing practice in the world. This is because it represents 80% of the composition of concrete that it is the object of such greed…


BE THE CHANGE:

PETITION: Take Action To End Global Beach Sand Mining, Coastal Care

beach-sand-mining-maroc
Illegal sand mining, coastal Morocco. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Land reclamation project starts in Monaco

hong-kong
Land reclamation, Hong Kong, South China Sea. Photograph: © SAF – Coastal Care
“Worldwide, the demand for sand and gravel stems from a wide range of sectors, its largest use however, being for construction and land reclamation.” UNEP – GEA, 2014.

Excerpts;

Work has begun on the maritime infrastructure that will constitute the first phase of the six-hectare land reclamation project. The total value of the maritime infrastructure works is approximately €1 billion…

Read Full Article, Dredging Online

Monaco commences €2 billion project to steal land from the sea, The Telegraph UK (09-12-2016)
Monaco has started work on a €2 billion (£1.8 billion) operation to claim six hectares (15 acres) from the sea in the minuscule principality.
The foundations for the titanic operation will take 40 months to complete and require dredging up and transporting hundreds of thousands of tons of sand from Sicily to create dry land, in a move that environmentalists warn will damage marine life…

Let’s Talk About Sand: Denis Delestrac At TEDxBarcelona (12-2013)

What Happens to a Coral Reef When an Island is Built on Top? the Washington Post (07-11-2015)

The Archipelago with Ubiquitous Land Reclamation Projects, Global Indonesian Voices; (04-28-2016)

Central Govt Halts Jakarta’s $40 Billion Reclamation Project, The Jakarta Post (04-13-2015)
Indonesia’s capital, Jakarta– home to 10 million people – is sinking into the sea at between 2.9 and 6.7 inches per year. To save the megacity from drowning: a $40 billion land reclamation and sea wall project estimated to take 30 years to complete. However, today, the central government has decided to suspend its implementation as the viability of the project is now questioned…

Built on Sand: Singapore and the New State of Risk, Harvard Design Magazine (09-07-2015)
The island’s expansion has been a colossal undertaking. It is not merely a matter of coastal reclamation: Singapore is growing vertically as well as horizontally. This means that the nation’s market needs fine river sand—used for beaches and concrete—as well as coarse sea sand to create new ground…

Sand, Rarer Than One Thinks: A UNEP report (GEA-March 2014)
Despite the colossal quantities of sand and gravel being used, our increasing dependence on them and the significant impact that their extraction has on the environment, this issue has been mostly ignored by policy makers and remains largely unknown by the general public.
In March 2014 The United Nations released its first Report about sand mining. “Sand Wars” film documentary by Denis Delestrac – first broadcasted on the european Arte Channel, May 28th, 2013, where it became the highest rated documentary for 2013 – expressly inspired the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to publish this 2014-Global Environmental Alert.

The Costa Del Concrete: Europe’s Coastlines and Urban Sprawl; Guardian UK (01-24-2015)
Two French oceanography researchers expected to find pollution on their 8,345km, 14-month kayak journey from Gibraltar to Istanbul, but what shocked them was the endless spread of cities along the coast…

Sand War in Bay of Lannion, Brittany, France

dredger
Onboard a sand dredger.
“Sand is the second most consumed natural resource, after water. The construction-building industry is by far the largest consumer of this finite resource. The traditional building of one average-sized house requires 200 tons of sand; a hospital requires 3,000 tons of sand; each kilometer of highway built requires 30,000 tons of sand… A nuclear plant, a staggering 12 million tons of sand…” Captions and Photograph by Award-winning Filmmaker: ©2013 Denis Delestrac

Excerpts;

Ségolène Royal reçoit ce lundi des élus de Lannion ainsi que des représentants d’associations qui exigent la fin de l’extraction de sable de la part de la Compagnie Armoricaine de Navigation. Pour Yves-Marie Le Lay, membre du collectif “le peuple des dunes”, cette extraction doit cessée…

Entre 4 et 5 000 personnes se sont rassemblées à Lannion dans les Côtes-d’Armor dimanche pour exiger la fin de l’extraction de sable de la part de la Compagnie Armoricaine de Navigation. Un sable coquillier provenant d’une dune sous-marine qui doit servir à réduire l’acidité des terres agricoles. Un dossier polémique ouvert depuis plusieurs années. Ségolène Royal reçoit aujourd’hui des élus de Lannion ainsi que des représentants d’associations. Pour Yves-Marie Le Lay, membre du collectif “le peuple des dunes”, cette extraction doit cessée…

Read Full Article, “Yves-Marie Le Lay (le peuple des dunes) : “On attend de S. Royal qu’elle suspende les extractions de sable à Lannion”;” France Info (September 12, 2016)

Translation:
Following yesterday’s rally, attended by around 4,000 to 5,000 people protesting against Lannion’s Bay ongoing sand extraction, Yves Marie Le Lay -representing the environmental group “Peuple Des Dunes”- and local officials, are to meet with the french Environment Minister Segolene Royal, to request the suspension of the controversial dredging concession granted to CAN Industry, whose current practices have been deemed questionable…

Pourquoi l’extraction de sable en Bretagne fait débat; Le Figaro (September 12, 2016)

Côtes-d’Armor: La guerre du sable; Paris-Match (09-09-2016)

Sable en baie de Lannion. Emmanuel Macron déplore déplore l’attitude de la Can; Ouest-France (09-11-2016)
France’s former Economy Minister, Emmanuel Macron, who last year, signed the decree granting concession of shell sand in Bay of Lannion to CAN Industry, is now denouncing CAN Industry’s dubious practices…

Read Full Article, “Extraction de sable. Le décret est signé, Peuple des dunes va attaquer;” Ouest-France (09-19-2015)
The decree granting concession of shell sand in Bay of Lannion, Brittany, to CAN Industry, was signed Monday and published this Wednesday in the Official Journal.
The french company is now allowed to dredge shell sand off Finistere and Armor’s coasts. The concession has been granted for 15 years and for an amount not to exceed 250,000m3 per year.
Mining of this sand will not be permitted between the months of May and August and environmental survey will be conducted.
The environmental group “Peuple Des Dunes” intends to appeal and file an action before the administrative court.

Sand Dredging: Let’s Save Brittany’s Shores, France; AVAAZ (10-11-2015)

Sand-Wars / Le Sable: Enquête sur une Disparition: Film Documentaire de Denis Delestrac (24-05-2014)