Sea Level Rise

Accelerated erosion

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There will always be beaches, but sea level rise will ensure that they will not be in the same place in the future. The beaches will still exist throughout this change, but many of the buildings may not. Efforts to save development, however do threaten beaches, such as shoreline armoring structures.

Although relative amounts of rise may seem very small, only a few millimeters per year, the cumulative effect of these small rises each year over a long period of time (100+ years) causes major problems. Accelerated rates of erosion are attributed to sea level rise and erosion causes large economic losses around the world each year due to the close proximity of buildings and critical infrastructure. This includes transportation systems, gas and oil lines as well as electricity lines and power plants.

Most developed coasts and beaches have buildings very close to the ocean leaving little room for the ever-expanding ocean. The future effects of sea level rise on coastal civilization over the entire world are of great concern. Over half of the world’s population lives within 100 km of the coast. Over the next 50 years, damage due to coastal development will be devastating, but if the rate of sea level rise increases, the results could be catastrophic. This issue threatens areas from New York City in the United States to the Pearl River Delta in China to the Maldives.

The world map below allows you to see elevations of coastal areas. Areas in red are the lowest in elevation and are most prone to flooding. Check out Manhattan in New York City. If you think the situation there looks dire, be sure to check out the effects of a 2 m rise in sea level on Pearl River Delta in China, home to more than 40 million people. Map courtesy of globalwarmingart.com


Surfing in / Sea Level Rise

Intensifying winds could increase east Antarctica’s contribution to sea level rise

A new study led by the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics has found that wind over the ocean off the coast of East Antarctica causes warm, deep waters to upwell, circulate under Totten Glacier, the largest glacier in East Antarctica, and melt the fringes of the East Antarctic ice sheet from below.

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Ancient storms could have hurled huge boulders, scientists say – raising new concerns of rising seas

An international team of researchers has come up with a new theory to explain how two giant boulders could have made their way atop a cliff on the Bahamian island of Eleuthera. They suspect it has something to do with the Atlantic Ocean far below them.

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Malibu, CA: Broad Beach Sand Project Costs Jump to $55-60 Million Per Decade

The Broad Beach Geologic Hazard Abatement District (GHAD) is now contending with another set of lawsuits over a project originally estimated to cost about $20 million, which is now estimated to cost $55 to $60 million every 10 years. The project will involve bringing in megatons of sand every few years to restore the disappearing beach and dunes.

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How cities are defending themselves against sea level rise

Superstorm Sandy and a series of lesser coastal storms since that 2012 disaster compelled some coastal communities to defend themselves by elevating homes and critical infrastructure, building sand dunes, widening beaches and erecting or raising sea walls. But as sea levels continue to rise around the world, that’s not an option in large cities.

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In the Trump era, rising seas still a concern for Defense Department

Climate scientists in the federal government have been on the defensive since President Donald Trump took office in January. But military leaders will continue to address the risks that climate change poses to bases and national security, a senior Pentagon official said at conference Friday on sea level rise.

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The Quick Demise of B-44

Scientists have long been tracking the retreat of Pine Island Glacier, one of the main outlets where ice from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet flows into the ocean. Attention recently turned once again to the glacier when it calved a large new iceberg, named B-44. Just weeks later, the berg has broken apart.

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Waiting for the tide to turn: Kiribati’s fight for survival

The 33 islands of Kiribati, a remote and low-lying nation in the Pacific Ocean, are under threat from climate change. But the islanders have not given up hope

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The only answer to rising seas is to retreat; By Orrin H. Pilkey & Keith C. Pilkey

Except for the timing, there is no controversy among scientists regarding sea level rise. Defending the coast and holding the shoreline in place ultimately will be futile. With a three-foot or a six-foot sea level rise, we will retreat, probably beginning within the next 50 years.

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Sea levels to rise 1.3m unless coal power ends by 2050, report says

Coastal cities around the world could be devastated by 1.3m of sea level rise this century unless coal-generated electricity is virtually eliminated by 2050, according to a University of Melbourne new paper that combines the latest understanding of Antarctica’s contribution to sea level rise and the latest emissions projection scenarios.

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Recent / Sea Level Rise

Ancient storms could have hurled huge boulders, scientists say – raising new concerns of rising seas

November 2nd, 2017

An international team of researchers has come up with a new theory to explain how two giant boulders could have made their way atop a cliff on the Bahamian island of Eleuthera. They suspect it has something to do with the Atlantic Ocean far below them.

Read More

Malibu, CA: Broad Beach Sand Project Costs Jump to $55-60 Million Per Decade

October 31st, 2017

The Broad Beach Geologic Hazard Abatement District (GHAD) is now contending with another set of lawsuits over a project originally estimated to cost about $20 million, which is now estimated to cost $55 to $60 million every 10 years. The project will involve bringing in megatons of sand every few years to restore the disappearing beach and dunes.

Read More

How cities are defending themselves against sea level rise

October 30th, 2017

Superstorm Sandy and a series of lesser coastal storms since that 2012 disaster compelled some coastal communities to defend themselves by elevating homes and critical infrastructure, building sand dunes, widening beaches and erecting or raising sea walls. But as sea levels continue to rise around the world, that’s not an option in large cities.

Read More

In the Trump era, rising seas still a concern for Defense Department

October 30th, 2017

Climate scientists in the federal government have been on the defensive since President Donald Trump took office in January. But military leaders will continue to address the risks that climate change poses to bases and national security, a senior Pentagon official said at conference Friday on sea level rise.

Read More

The Quick Demise of B-44

October 28th, 2017

Scientists have long been tracking the retreat of Pine Island Glacier, one of the main outlets where ice from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet flows into the ocean. Attention recently turned once again to the glacier when it calved a large new iceberg, named B-44. Just weeks later, the berg has broken apart.

Read More

Waiting for the tide to turn: Kiribati’s fight for survival

October 27th, 2017

The 33 islands of Kiribati, a remote and low-lying nation in the Pacific Ocean, are under threat from climate change. But the islanders have not given up hope

Read More

The only answer to rising seas is to retreat; By Orrin H. Pilkey & Keith C. Pilkey

October 27th, 2017

Except for the timing, there is no controversy among scientists regarding sea level rise. Defending the coast and holding the shoreline in place ultimately will be futile. With a three-foot or a six-foot sea level rise, we will retreat, probably beginning within the next 50 years.

Read More

Sea levels to rise 1.3m unless coal power ends by 2050, report says

October 26th, 2017

Coastal cities around the world could be devastated by 1.3m of sea level rise this century unless coal-generated electricity is virtually eliminated by 2050, according to a University of Melbourne new paper that combines the latest understanding of Antarctica’s contribution to sea level rise and the latest emissions projection scenarios.

Read More

Rising seas threaten nearly $1 trillion worth of US homes, and most of them are moderately priced

October 25th, 2017

If sea levels were to rise 6 feet, 1.9 million homes, or $916 billion worth of U.S. residential real estate, could be lost, according to a new report.

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Drones used to map climate change in Zanzibar

October 24th, 2017

In Zanzibar, which is a series of islands off the east coast of Africa, a group is using drones to map the effects of rising sea levels and global temperatures in an effort to combat local climate change.

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