Sea Level Rise

Accelerated erosion

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There will always be beaches, but sea level rise will ensure that they will not be in the same place in the future. The beaches will still exist throughout this change, but many of the buildings may not. Efforts to save development, however do threaten beaches, such as shoreline armoring structures.

Although relative amounts of rise may seem very small, only a few millimeters per year, the cumulative effect of these small rises each year over a long period of time (100+ years) causes major problems. Accelerated rates of erosion are attributed to sea level rise and erosion causes large economic losses around the world each year due to the close proximity of buildings and critical infrastructure. This includes transportation systems, gas and oil lines as well as electricity lines and power plants.

Most developed coasts and beaches have buildings very close to the ocean leaving little room for the ever-expanding ocean. The future effects of sea level rise on coastal civilization over the entire world are of great concern. Over half of the world’s population lives within 100 km of the coast. Over the next 50 years, damage due to coastal development will be devastating, but if the rate of sea level rise increases, the results could be catastrophic. This issue threatens areas from New York City in the United States to the Pearl River Delta in China to the Maldives.

The world map below allows you to see elevations of coastal areas. Areas in red are the lowest in elevation and are most prone to flooding. Check out Manhattan in New York City. If you think the situation there looks dire, be sure to check out the effects of a 2 m rise in sea level on Pearl River Delta in China, home to more than 40 million people. Map courtesy of globalwarmingart.com


Surfing in / Sea Level Rise

“We are at war”: Expect almost 5 feet of sea level rise when planning for the future, leaders say

Building a road, a school, a bridge in Hampton Roads? Think about how long you want it to be around, and whether it might be underwater by then. That’s what regional planners recommend in light of sea levels projected to rise nearly 5 feet over the next century.

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NC beach homes and coast are ‘doomed’ and residents need to get out, scientist says

There’s a “disaster” approaching North Carolina’s coast, and it’s not a hurricane. It’s an increasingly encroaching sea, Orrin Pilkey says.

Comments Off on NC beach homes and coast are ‘doomed’ and residents need to get out, scientist says

Scientists find missing piece in glacier melt predictions

A new method for observing water within ice has revealed stored meltwater that may explain the complex flow behavior of some Greenland glaciers, an important component for predicting sea-level rise in a changing climate.

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Climate Diaries: The hottest climate science in the world’s coldest place

A lot of what’s happening to sea level starts at the poles, where that ice is either liberated or sequestered … melted or frozen. NASA’s “Operation IceBridge” flies planes to Antarctica from South America to study how fast that continent’s ice is melting.

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Maui more susceptible to erosion from rising sea levels

Maui lands vulnerable to erosion are more than double previous projections, according to a new University of Hawaii study released last month.

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Sinking Santa Cruz: climate change threatens famed California beach town

Similar challenges are sprouting up along the coast, and the golden sands and beach properties that define the state at risk.

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Why sea level rise threatens more than just land

In the Southeast, we stand to lose precious wildlife and culture, too. According to the scientific journal Plos One, more than 13,000 archaeological sites across the Southeast will disappear, many of those historical, cultural and architectural treasures are found on refuges from North Carolina to Florida to Texas…

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Hawai’i land impacted by sea level rise may be double previous estimates

By including models of dynamical physical processes such as erosion and wave run-up, a team of researchers has determined that land area in Hawai’i vulnerable to future sea level rise may be double previous estimates.

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Dramatic videos capture the moment a massive iceberg breaks away from a glacier

Scientists from New York University captured breathtaking video of a 4-mile-long iceberg breaking off Helheim Glacier in eastern Greenland. While captivating, the researchers see the video as an alarming look at global sea-level rise.

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Recent / Sea Level Rise

NC beach homes and coast are ‘doomed’ and residents need to get out, scientist says

October 17th, 2018

There’s a “disaster” approaching North Carolina’s coast, and it’s not a hurricane. It’s an increasingly encroaching sea, Orrin Pilkey says.

Read More

Scientists find missing piece in glacier melt predictions

October 15th, 2018

A new method for observing water within ice has revealed stored meltwater that may explain the complex flow behavior of some Greenland glaciers, an important component for predicting sea-level rise in a changing climate.

Read More

Climate Diaries: The hottest climate science in the world’s coldest place

October 15th, 2018

A lot of what’s happening to sea level starts at the poles, where that ice is either liberated or sequestered … melted or frozen. NASA’s “Operation IceBridge” flies planes to Antarctica from South America to study how fast that continent’s ice is melting.

Read More

Maui more susceptible to erosion from rising sea levels

October 14th, 2018

Maui lands vulnerable to erosion are more than double previous projections, according to a new University of Hawaii study released last month.

Read More

Sinking Santa Cruz: climate change threatens famed California beach town

October 11th, 2018

Similar challenges are sprouting up along the coast, and the golden sands and beach properties that define the state at risk.

Read More

Why sea level rise threatens more than just land

October 3rd, 2018

In the Southeast, we stand to lose precious wildlife and culture, too. According to the scientific journal Plos One, more than 13,000 archaeological sites across the Southeast will disappear, many of those historical, cultural and architectural treasures are found on refuges from North Carolina to Florida to Texas…

Read More

Hawai’i land impacted by sea level rise may be double previous estimates

September 29th, 2018

By including models of dynamical physical processes such as erosion and wave run-up, a team of researchers has determined that land area in Hawai’i vulnerable to future sea level rise may be double previous estimates.

Read More

Dramatic videos capture the moment a massive iceberg breaks away from a glacier

September 24th, 2018

Scientists from New York University captured breathtaking video of a 4-mile-long iceberg breaking off Helheim Glacier in eastern Greenland. While captivating, the researchers see the video as an alarming look at global sea-level rise.

Read More

Scientists warned of rising sea levels in NC. Republican lawmakers shelved their recommendations.

September 16th, 2018

The state’s coastal plain, would not be in such grave danger if lawmakers had not rejected a study prepared by a panel of scientists and engineers, that predicted the sea level would rise 39 inches by 2100 because of climate change.

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North Carolina didn’t like science on sea levels, so passed a law against it

September 12th, 2018

In 2012, the state whose low-lying coast lies in the path of Hurricane Florence reacted to a prediction of catastrophically rising seas by banning policies based on such forecasts.

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