Sea Level Rise

Accelerated erosion

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There will always be beaches, but sea level rise will ensure that they will not be in the same place in the future. The beaches will still exist throughout this change, but many of the buildings may not. Efforts to save development, however do threaten beaches, such as shoreline armoring structures.

Although relative amounts of rise may seem very small, only a few millimeters per year, the cumulative effect of these small rises each year over a long period of time (100+ years) causes major problems. Accelerated rates of erosion are attributed to sea level rise and erosion causes large economic losses around the world each year due to the close proximity of buildings and critical infrastructure. This includes transportation systems, gas and oil lines as well as electricity lines and power plants.

Most developed coasts and beaches have buildings very close to the ocean leaving little room for the ever-expanding ocean. The future effects of sea level rise on coastal civilization over the entire world are of great concern. Over half of the world’s population lives within 100 km of the coast. Over the next 50 years, damage due to coastal development will be devastating, but if the rate of sea level rise increases, the results could be catastrophic. This issue threatens areas from New York City in the United States to the Pearl River Delta in China to the Maldives.

The world map below allows you to see elevations of coastal areas. Areas in red are the lowest in elevation and are most prone to flooding. Check out Manhattan in New York City. If you think the situation there looks dire, be sure to check out the effects of a 2 m rise in sea level on Pearl River Delta in China, home to more than 40 million people. Map courtesy of globalwarmingart.com


Surfing in / Sea Level Rise

Cost of Coastal Flooding in Europe Could Reach $1 Trillion Annually by 2100

Without additional climate change adaptation measures, the annual cost of damage from coastal flooding in Europe could jump from $1.4 billion today to as much as $1 trillion by the end of the century due largely to rising sea levels according to new study.

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“A place in crisis”: Author documents life on disappearing Tangier Island

Tangier Island, which is home to about 450 people, is slowly disappearing due to sea level change and shoreline erosion.

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Sea level rise has already sunk Carolinas beach property values — by $1.6 billion, study finds

Sea levels are rising and the southeast has already lost billions in property value, a recent study shows. Scientists have found $7.4 billion was lost in home values across North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia and Florida because of sea level rise flooding from 2005 to 2017.

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Study Finds Link Between River Outflow and Coastal Sea Level

Sea levels in coastal areas can be affected by a number of factors: tides, winds, waves, and even barometric pressure all play a role in the ebb and flow of the ocean. For the first time, however, a new study has shown that river outflow could play a role in sea level change as well.

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The sinking state

This is what happens when climate change forces an entire country to seek higher ground.

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Coastal homes could see flood insurance premium going up again, and that’s only the beginning

FEMA is looking into switching to risk-based pricing in 2020, which would end the subsidies most coastal communities enjoy on their flood insurance premiums and show the true dollar cost of living in areas repeatedly pounded by hurricanes and drenched with floods.

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Coastal residents need to set aside money now to cope with future flooding

Sea-level rise is a national economic insecurity. According to the National Ocean Service, 39 percent of the U.S. population in 2010 lived in counties that are on shorelines.

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Surrendering to rising seas

Coastal communities struggling to adapt to climate change are beginning to do what was once unthinkable: retreat

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How Rising Seas Could Threaten the Internet

Climate change poses a serious threat to the United States’ internet infrastructure, with more than 4,000 miles of fiber optic cable expected to be under water within 15 years from just 1 foot of sea level rise, according to a new analysis.

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Recent / Sea Level Rise

Study Finds Link Between River Outflow and Coastal Sea Level

July 28th, 2018

Sea levels in coastal areas can be affected by a number of factors: tides, winds, waves, and even barometric pressure all play a role in the ebb and flow of the ocean. For the first time, however, a new study has shown that river outflow could play a role in sea level change as well.

Read More

The sinking state

July 27th, 2018

This is what happens when climate change forces an entire country to seek higher ground.

Read More

Coastal homes could see flood insurance premium going up again, and that’s only the beginning

July 25th, 2018

FEMA is looking into switching to risk-based pricing in 2020, which would end the subsidies most coastal communities enjoy on their flood insurance premiums and show the true dollar cost of living in areas repeatedly pounded by hurricanes and drenched with floods.

Read More

Coastal residents need to set aside money now to cope with future flooding

July 18th, 2018

Sea-level rise is a national economic insecurity. According to the National Ocean Service, 39 percent of the U.S. population in 2010 lived in counties that are on shorelines.

Read More

Surrendering to rising seas

July 18th, 2018

Coastal communities struggling to adapt to climate change are beginning to do what was once unthinkable: retreat

Read More

How Rising Seas Could Threaten the Internet

July 17th, 2018

Climate change poses a serious threat to the United States’ internet infrastructure, with more than 4,000 miles of fiber optic cable expected to be under water within 15 years from just 1 foot of sea level rise, according to a new analysis.

Read More

Sea Level Rise Could Double Erosion Rates of Southern California Coastal Cliffs

July 16th, 2018

Coastal cliffs from Santa Barbara to San Diego might crumble at more than twice the historical rate by the year 2100 as sea levels rise. U.S. Geological Survey scientists combined several computer models for the first time to forecast cliff erosion along the Southern California coast.

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Rising ocean waters from global warming could cost trillions of dollars

July 12th, 2018

We’ll need to mitigate and adapt to global warming to avoid massive costs from sea level rise.

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There could be a lot more water and a lot less sand at beaches this week, NOAA says

July 12th, 2018

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said higher-than-normal tides are expected in coastal areas of the U.S. July 12-16.

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Rising sea levels could cost the world $14 trillion a year by 2100

July 3rd, 2018

Failure to meet the United Nations’ 2ºC warming limits will lead to sea level rise and dire global economic consequences, new research has warned. A study found flooding from rising sea levels could cost $14 trillion worldwide annually by 2100, if the target of holding global temperatures below 2ºC above pre-industrial levels is missed.

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