Sea Level Rise

Accelerated erosion

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There will always be beaches, but sea level rise will ensure that they will not be in the same place in the future. The beaches will still exist throughout this change, but many of the buildings may not. Efforts to save development, however do threaten beaches, such as shoreline armoring structures.

Although relative amounts of rise may seem very small, only a few millimeters per year, the cumulative effect of these small rises each year over a long period of time (100+ years) causes major problems. Accelerated rates of erosion are attributed to sea level rise and erosion causes large economic losses around the world each year due to the close proximity of buildings and critical infrastructure. This includes transportation systems, gas and oil lines as well as electricity lines and power plants.

Most developed coasts and beaches have buildings very close to the ocean leaving little room for the ever-expanding ocean. The future effects of sea level rise on coastal civilization over the entire world are of great concern. Over half of the world’s population lives within 100 km of the coast. Over the next 50 years, damage due to coastal development will be devastating, but if the rate of sea level rise increases, the results could be catastrophic. This issue threatens areas from New York City in the United States to the Pearl River Delta in China to the Maldives.

The world map below allows you to see elevations of coastal areas. Areas in red are the lowest in elevation and are most prone to flooding. Check out Manhattan in New York City. If you think the situation there looks dire, be sure to check out the effects of a 2 m rise in sea level on Pearl River Delta in China, home to more than 40 million people. Map courtesy of globalwarmingart.com


Surfing in / Sea Level Rise

There could be a lot more water and a lot less sand at beaches this week, NOAA says

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said higher-than-normal tides are expected in coastal areas of the U.S. July 12-16.

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Rising sea levels could cost the world $14 trillion a year by 2100

Failure to meet the United Nations’ 2ºC warming limits will lead to sea level rise and dire global economic consequences, new research has warned. A study found flooding from rising sea levels could cost $14 trillion worldwide annually by 2100, if the target of holding global temperatures below 2ºC above pre-industrial levels is missed.

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Sea level rise study shows Charleston area one of the riskiest places to live in Southeast

Within the next three decades, nearly 8,000 homes in Charleston County, SC, could flood at least 26 times a year if the sea level rises by 2 feet, considered by climate experts to be a worst-case scenario.

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Flooding from sea level rise threatens over 300,000 US coastal homes – study

Sea level rise driven by climate change is set to pose an existential crisis to many US coastal communities, with new research finding that as many as 311,000 homes face being flooded every two weeks within the next 30 years.

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Coastal communities saw record number of high tide flooding days last year

People living on the coast may see flooded sidewalks and streets more frequently this year due, in part, to El Nino conditions that are predicted to develop later this year, and from long-term sea level rise trends.

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Rate of Antarctica’s ice melting has tripled since 2012, study finds

The rate at which ice is melting on Antarctica has tripled in recent years, according to a study published Wednesday in Nature. Coastal communities along the U.S. could feel the impact of a continued increase as melting ice adds to sea level rise, say experts.

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Bracing for the meltwater pulse in Miami

coastal-erosion

How rising seas are already dismantling our ideas of home.

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Our coastal cemeteries are falling into the sea; By Orrin H. Pilkey & William J. Neal

Cemeteries in coastal areas were not located with the expectation that they would flood or fall into the sea. But most of the world’s ocean and estuarine shorelines are eroding — some slowly like California’s rocky coasts, and others rapidly like the Carolinas’ barrier island coasts.

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Del Mar takes another look at rising sea level and unpopular ‘planned retreat’

The California Coastal Commission requires all coastal cities to have a sea-rise adaptation plan, and to include planned retreat as part of their strategy.

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Recent / Sea Level Rise

Flooding from sea level rise threatens over 300,000 US coastal homes – study

June 18th, 2018

Sea level rise driven by climate change is set to pose an existential crisis to many US coastal communities, with new research finding that as many as 311,000 homes face being flooded every two weeks within the next 30 years.

Read More

Coastal communities saw record number of high tide flooding days last year

June 14th, 2018

People living on the coast may see flooded sidewalks and streets more frequently this year due, in part, to El Nino conditions that are predicted to develop later this year, and from long-term sea level rise trends.

Read More

Rate of Antarctica’s ice melting has tripled since 2012, study finds

June 13th, 2018

The rate at which ice is melting on Antarctica has tripled in recent years, according to a study published Wednesday in Nature. Coastal communities along the U.S. could feel the impact of a continued increase as melting ice adds to sea level rise, say experts.

Read More

Bracing for the meltwater pulse in Miami

coastal-erosion

June 6th, 2018

How rising seas are already dismantling our ideas of home.

Read More

Our coastal cemeteries are falling into the sea; By Orrin H. Pilkey & William J. Neal

May 29th, 2018

Cemeteries in coastal areas were not located with the expectation that they would flood or fall into the sea. But most of the world’s ocean and estuarine shorelines are eroding — some slowly like California’s rocky coasts, and others rapidly like the Carolinas’ barrier island coasts.

Read More

Del Mar takes another look at rising sea level and unpopular ‘planned retreat’

May 25th, 2018

The California Coastal Commission requires all coastal cities to have a sea-rise adaptation plan, and to include planned retreat as part of their strategy.

Read More

Republican congressman explains sea-level rise: it’s rocks falling into the sea

May 17th, 2018

Member of Congress has suggested that the White Cliffs of Dover tumbling into the English Channel was causing rising sea levels, pushing back at the notion that rising sea levels were the result of global warming.

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New model could help rebuild eroding lands in coastal Louisiana

May 8th, 2018

As coastal lands in Louisiana erode, researchers, environmentalists and engineers are all searching for ways to preserve the marsh coastline.

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Sea-level rise: the defining issue of the century; Editorial

May 6th, 2018

No graver threat faces the future of South Florida than the accelerating pace of sea-level rise. In the past century, the sea has risen 9 inches. In the past 23 years, it’s risen 3 inches. By 2060, it’s predicted to rise another 2 feet, with no sign of slowing down.

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Everglades under threat as Florida’s mangroves face death by rising sea level

May 4th, 2018

Florida’s mangroves have been forced into a hasty retreat by sea level rise and now face being drowned, imperiling coastal communities and the prized Everglades wetlands, researchers have found.

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