Sea Level Rise

Accelerated erosion

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There will always be beaches, but sea level rise will ensure that they will not be in the same place in the future. The beaches will still exist throughout this change, but many of the buildings may not. Efforts to save development, however do threaten beaches, such as shoreline armoring structures.

Although relative amounts of rise may seem very small, only a few millimeters per year, the cumulative effect of these small rises each year over a long period of time (100+ years) causes major problems. Accelerated rates of erosion are attributed to sea level rise and erosion causes large economic losses around the world each year due to the close proximity of buildings and critical infrastructure. This includes transportation systems, gas and oil lines as well as electricity lines and power plants.

Most developed coasts and beaches have buildings very close to the ocean leaving little room for the ever-expanding ocean. The future effects of sea level rise on coastal civilization over the entire world are of great concern. Over half of the world’s population lives within 100 km of the coast. Over the next 50 years, damage due to coastal development will be devastating, but if the rate of sea level rise increases, the results could be catastrophic. This issue threatens areas from New York City in the United States to the Pearl River Delta in China to the Maldives.

The world map below allows you to see elevations of coastal areas. Areas in red are the lowest in elevation and are most prone to flooding. Check out Manhattan in New York City. If you think the situation there looks dire, be sure to check out the effects of a 2 m rise in sea level on Pearl River Delta in China, home to more than 40 million people. Map courtesy of globalwarmingart.com


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Solar Power in the Maldives

With hardly any land more than 8 feet above sea level, thus particularly vulnerable should seas rise several feet by the end of the century, the Maldives stands at the front line of climate change, and has announced plans to green its energy sector and pledged under the Copenhagen Accord to become carbon neutral by 2020.

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Sea level rise in Norway in the 21st century

The tables show estimated values for sea level rise, land rise and flooding for the years 2050 and 2100.

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Lagos Expansion Into Atlantic Ocean, Nigeria

By 2016, Lagos will get a new city to be built on nine million square metres of reclaimed land about 2.4 kilometres into the Atlantic Ocean, south of Ahmadu Bello Way, Victoria Island.

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Global Groundwater Depletion Leads to Sea Level Rise

Scientists have conducted a global assessment on the current large-scale abstraction of groundwater worldwide, and the effect of groundwater depletion on sea level rise, with remarkable results.

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New York Seas to Rise Twice as Much as Rest of U.S.

Sea levels around New York City and much of the U.S. Northeast will rise twice as much as in other parts of the United States this century, according to new climate models.

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Palau, at risk from rising seas, aims to drill for oil

Many island nations around the world are looking for creative solutions to a pending crisis, predicted boosts in sea level, associated with climate change. Analysts though, question why the World Bank is helping Palau develop fossil fuel resources when the island’s very existence is threatened by the burning of them.

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Melting sea ice forces walruses ashore in Alaska

walruses

Massive super-herds of walrus are being forced onto dry land because of a lack of sea ice, the World Wildlife Fund reports. Discovery News UGC video shows an estimated 10,000 animals gathered in Point Lay, Alaska. This massive move to shore by walruses is unusual in the United States.

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New York City and Risk of Higher Seas

Sea level may rise faster near New York than at most other densely populated ports, thus it has become an urban experiment in the ways that seaboard cities can adapt to climate change over the next century.

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Coral Reef and Planet’s Changing Sea Levels

By studying ancient coral, scientists are hoping to put together the most accurate picture yet of how sea levels have changed over thousands of years.

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