Tag Archives: Beach Art

Survivors’ tales part of the art in Superstorm Sandy exhibit

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Photo source: ©© Hunter Desportes

Excerpts;

The stories of people who survived Superstorm Sandy, scrawled in their own handwriting, are an integral part of a new art exhibit remembering the deadly storm and the devastation it caused seven years ago. The “Just Beachy After Sandy” exhibit at Monmouth University in New Jersey is on display through early December…

Read Full Article; ABC News (10-27-2019)

Sandy Reminds Us of Coastal Hazards, by Robert Young

As the climate warms, we are ‘primed’ for worse storms than Sandy; Science Daily (10-06-2016)
With the climate warming and the sea level rising, conditions are ripe for storms deadlier and more devastating than Sandy that put more people at risk. If damaging storms become more frequent, retreat from areas with mounting repetitive losses will become a topic of discussion…

A Year After Sandy, The Wrong Policy on Rebuilding the Coast, by Robert Young Yale 360 E (10-31-2013)

Action Climate – II ; By HA Schult

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By © HA Schult
Image originally published on: April 1st, 2014

HA Schult was one of the first artists to deal with the ecological imbalances in his work.

He is a major contributor to today`s new ecological awareness.

His works were on show on all continents. They are in many private and public collections all over the world… HA Schult Art is Life

HA Schult Art is Life, on Facebook

In celebration of Coastal Care’s 10 years Anniversary, we are republishing an acclaimed selection of the most popular Photo Of the Month contributions.

“Our Deepest Gratitude And Thanks To Our Talented And Inspiring Photo Of The Month Photographers Contributors. —Santa Aguila Foundation – Coastal Care”

Ocean trash is building up. This artist reveals what’s out there.

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“Sea Life.” © 2016 Barry Rosenthal.
“Found in Nature” series
All rights remain the property of Barry Rosenthal.
Originally published in Coastal Care October 1, 2016.

Excerpts;

Barry Rosenthal started collecting plastic garbage on a New York shoreline. His photographs reveal the variety of water-borne trash…

Read Full Article; National Geographic (09-12-2019)

Tony Plant’s Beach Art, Filmed By Ruarri Joseph

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WATCH: “Till The Luck Runs Dry – Ruarri Joseph and Tony Plant”, a Youtube Video, Uploaded By LightColorSound

Excerpts;

“Tony Plant is an Artist like no other. What you see here is just a small cherry on a cake to the artwork Tony has done over the years.

It was during the making of this film i realised the depth to Tonys artistic talents as he explained to me that in one of the shots there was a pole he had painted red over 6 years ago. He saw the pole was rotting and the texture of the dyeing grain represented the veins of life decaying away. By painting them red the veins stood out. It would only be the passer by with open eyes and mind that would see the pole and see its future within its surroundings….

The intention wasn’t to look at the pole. But to stop, and see the beauty we are surrounded by….”

Original Video And Read More, Youtube

Tony Plant’s Ethereal Sand Drawing Art

Artist replaces sand with microplastic found on beaches in contemporary hourglass


“The unprecedented plastic waste tide plaguing our oceans and shores, can become as limited as our chosen relationship with plastics, which involves a dramatic behavioral change on our part…”
Captions and Photo: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

Designer Brodie Neill has created a contemporary hourglass filled with microplastic instead of sand to highlight the issue of ocean plastic pollution.

The Capsule hourglass, which is filled with microplastic collected by Neill from beaches in Tasmania where he grew up, is an open-edition piece…

Read Full Article; Dezeen (04-07-2019)

Brodie Neill showcases his “ocean terrazzo” with waterfall installation; Dezeen (09-16-2018)
Designer Brodie Neill has worked with recycled ocean plastic to produce new furniture pieces, and used them to create a waterfall installation in a London hotel. It is intended to encourage people to think more carefully about how they contribute to the vast global consumption of plastics…

Microplastic pollution revealed ‘absolutely everywhere’ by new research; Guardian UK (03-06-2019)
Microplastic pollution spans the world, according to new studies. Humans are known to consume the tiny plastic particles via food and water, but the possible health effects on people and ecosystems have yet to be determined…

Trillions of Plastic Bits, Swept Up by Current, Are Littering Arctic Waters; The New York Times (04-19-2017)

Microplastic pollution in oceans is far worse than feared, say scientists; Guardian UK (03-12-2018)

Microplastics pollute most remote and uncharted areas of the ocean; Guardian UK (02-12-2018)
First data ever gathered from extremely remote area of the South Indian Ocean has a surprisingly high volume of plastic particles, say scientists. Currently scientists can only account for 1% of the plastic they think is in the ocean…

Video captures moment plastic enters food chain, BBC News (03-11-2017)
A scientist has filmed the moment plastic microfibre is ingested by plankton, illustrating how the material is affecting life beneath the waves. The footage shows one way that plastic waste could be entering the marine and global food chain…

People may be breathing in microplastics, health expert warns; Guardian UK (05-10-2016)
People could be breathing in microparticles of plastic, according to a leading environmental health expert, with as yet unknown consequences on health…

Plastic Pollution: When The Mermaids Cry, The Great Plastic Tide, Coastal Care
Washed out on our coasts in obvious and clearly visible form, the plastic pollution spectacle blatantly unveiling on our beaches is only the prelude of the greater story that unfolded further away in the world’s oceans, yet mostly originating from where we stand: the land…

The sands of time; The New York Times (12-15-2017)
Human intervention to control beach depth is often futile. Repeated studies have found that sand pumped onto beaches in order to protect coastal property may be washed out by a storm or two. These beaches commonly lose all the new sand in five years or so…

Sand, Rarer Than One Thinks: A UNEP report (GEA-March 2014)
Despite the colossal quantities of sand and gravel being used, our increasing dependence on them and the significant impact that their extraction has on the environment, this issue has been mostly ignored by policy makers and remains largely unknown by the general public.
In March 2014 The United Nations released its first Report about sand mining. “Sand Wars” film documentary by Denis Delestrac – first broadcasted on the european Arte Channel, May 28th, 2013, where it became the highest rated documentary for 2013 – expressly inspired the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to publish this 2014-Global Environmental Alert.

Sand Wars, An Investigation Documentary, By Award-Winning Filmmaker Denis Delestrac (©-2013)
“Sand is the second most consumed natural resource, after water. The construction-building industry is by far the largest consumer of this finite resource. The traditional building of one average-sized house requires 200 tons of sand; a hospital requires 3,000 tons of sand; each kilometer of highway built requires 30,000 tons of sand… A nuclear plant, a staggering 12 million tons of sand…”—Denis Delestrac -(©-2013)

Midnight Blue – a sand art animation, by David Myriam


WATCH: “Midnight Blue” – sand art animation; By David Myriam, Vimeo (Length: 07’55” – June 2013.)

Excerpts;

This ecological tale takes us to the heart of the underwater world, between night and light, following the rhythm of a whale’s meditations, a privileged witness of human activity on the oceans…

“I imagined this film after creation of two live sand drawing performances for the Festival Musica Nigella in 2011, with music by Crumb and Natsuda.

The theme of the concert was “The Secret Life of Oceans” , and I was inspired dramas including the Japanese tsunami and Fukushima nuclear disaster , and the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico after the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil platform operated by BP.

For the first time , I used blue sand , which corresponded well to the diving atmosphere.
Thereafter, I imagined a storyboard inspired by these performances , adding other elements , including the issue of fishing and fish consumption.

Once editing advanced , on the advice of productor Citron Bien & Hélène Ducrocq , I wrote a poem to give another dimension to the film. For the first time , I created a movie with lyrics…” – David Myriam

Read Original Article And Learn More, on Vimeo

David Myriam, The Moving Sand