Surfing Tags / Beach of the Month

Dauphin Island, AL; By George Crozier and John Dindo

Dauphin Island is a “drumstick” shaped barrier island (16miles/26 km) on the western side of the main pass at Mobile Bay about 48 km (30 miles) south of Mobile, Alabama. The relationship between the east end of the island and the ebb tidal delta, referred to as the “Sand Island/Pelican Island” complex, is extraordinarily dynamic and complex.

Comments Off on Dauphin Island, AL; By George Crozier and John Dindo

Beaches of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Michigan; By William J. Neal & Gregory C. Wilson

Sleeping Bear’s recognition as one of Nature’s masterpieces of the work of glaciers, lakes, wind and water, led to its 71,000 acres being given National Lakeshore status in the National Park System in 1970. Just as significant was the designation of over 32,000 acres of that area as ‘Wilderness’ in the National Wilderness Preservation System in 2014.

Comments Off on Beaches of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Michigan; By William J. Neal & Gregory C. Wilson

Monterey Bay, California: Beach Sand Mining from a National Marine Sanctuary; By Gary Griggs

The 30-mile long, continuous sandy shoreline around Monterey Bay is the most visited stretch of shoreline on the central coast. Yet, it holds the dubious distinction of being the only active beach sand mining operation along the entire United States shoreline. To make matters even worse, it all takes place along the shoreline of a protected National Marine Sanctuary. Something is seriously wrong with this picture.

Comments Off on Monterey Bay, California: Beach Sand Mining from a National Marine Sanctuary; By Gary Griggs

Volunteer Beach, Falkland Islands; By Joe Kelley

The Falkland Islands are a place distant from most people, but magical in their wildness and wildlife. Volunteer Beach is one of the nearest big beaches to the only town in the Falklands, Stanley.

Comments Off on Volunteer Beach, Falkland Islands; By Joe Kelley

Kamchia-Shkorpilovtsi Beach, Bulgaria; By Margarita Stancheva, Rob Young & Hristo Stanchev

In the middle of the Bulgarian Black Sea coast is Kamchia-Shkorpilovtsi beach, the longest sand beach in Bulgaria. The beach is fairly undeveloped and natural, in particular in its southern part.

Comments Off on Kamchia-Shkorpilovtsi Beach, Bulgaria; By Margarita Stancheva, Rob Young & Hristo Stanchev

Sand Beaches Of The Northeast Coast Of Saudi Arabia; By Miles O. Hayes and Jacqueline Michel

The purpose of this discussion is to describe the geomorphology and dynamic coastal processes of the sand beaches along the northeast coast of Saudi Arabia. The study area extends from the Kuwait border to the southern end of Abu Ali. This is, in effect, the shoreline oiled during the Gulf War oil spill of 1991, the largest oil spill in history. By Miles O. Hayes and Jacqueline Michel.

Comments Off on Sand Beaches Of The Northeast Coast Of Saudi Arabia; By Miles O. Hayes and Jacqueline Michel

East Florida’s Barrier Islands: Natural vs. Man-Made; By Dr. Charles W. Finkl

Florida is world famous for its white sandy beaches, yet many if not most of the beaches in southeast Florida have been renourished. That is, they are man-made beaches that are periodically replenished with sand dredged from the floor of the ocean. In spite of the fact that most beachgoers are unaware that many Florida beaches are artificial, even more people do not realize that the barrier islands along the southeast Florida shore are man-made coastal features, much larger and more imposing than the beach itself. By Dr. Charles W. Finkl

Comments Off on East Florida’s Barrier Islands: Natural vs. Man-Made; By Dr. Charles W. Finkl

Perranporth Beach, Cornwall, England; By Norma Longo

Facing the Atlantic Ocean and Perran Bay on the north coast of Cornwall is Perranporth Beach, one of the best in England, a popular beach for surfing, rock- pooling, horseback riding, walking, and engaging in various other sporting activities. The coastal setting includes dunes, cliffs, tidal pools, and a stream mouth, plus various reminders of Cornwall’s ubiquitous mining history. By Norma Longo.

2 comments

Cemeteries in the Sea; By William J. Neal & Orrin H. Pilkey

Cemeteries by the sea are silent sentinels. Like lighthouses and coastal fortifications, they bear dates of former times when they were on high and dry land. By William J. Neal and Orrin H. Pilkey.

Comments Off on Cemeteries in the Sea; By William J. Neal & Orrin H. Pilkey

More / Beach Of The Month

Big Talbot Island’s Blackrock Trail; By Cecelia Dailey

May 1st, 2019

The locals call it “lava beach”—a misnomer which leads some to believe the unique formation found here are igneous in origin. But these mystifying “black rocks” crumble to the touch, staining the hands, feeling gritty with sand. Although many are black, these “rocks” are sometimes light colored, deep red or burnt brown.

Read More

Terraces and Towns; By Gary Griggs

April 1st, 2019

The geologic history of California’s north coast is evident in the typically steep relief and coastal landforms. This is an area where a drive along much of the narrow lanes of State Highway One along the often steep coast is always an adventure and where it’s never wise to take your eyes off the road for very long. Most of the beaches occur at the mouths of the coastal streams.

Read More

A Special Beach: Nauthólsvík Geothermal Beach, Iceland; By Norma J. Longo & Orrin H. Pilkey

February 1st, 2019

Iceland is a land of black beaches, usually with a large gravel component. But one Icelandic beach near Reykjavík is different.

Read More

“Beach Robbers”; By Charles O. Pilkey

December 1st, 2018

“Beach Robbers”, is a book chapter written and illustrated by Charles O. Pilkey, excerpted from “The Magic Dolphin: A Young Human’s Guide to Beaches, Sea Level Rise and Living with the Sea” by Charles O. Pilkey with Orrin H. Pilkey.

Read More

California’s Coastal Harbors, Beach Compartments and Sand Dredging; By Gary Griggs

October 1st, 2018

Every year the dredge at the Santa Cruz Small Craft Harbor along central California’s northern Monterey Bay sucks up about 250,000 cubic yards of sand, on average, from the entrance channel and pumps it out onto Twin Lakes Beach where it continues its journey down coast. If it were put in dump trucks, it would fill about 25,000 of them, but the waves can move all that sand without any human labor, and without any noise or carbon emissions.

Read More

Beyond Preservation: The Coral Restoration Foundation Bonaire; By Andrew Jalbert

August 1st, 2018

When avid scuba diver and famed Jurassic Park author Michael Crichton first visited Bonaire decades ago, he eloquently described the underwater environment as, “a world of riotous, outrageous color.” Years later, Bonaire has seen some changes but his assessment still largely rings true.

Read More

Management Strategies for Coastal Erosion Processes; By Nelson Rangel-Buitrago

June 1st, 2018

The Special Issue Management Strategies for Coastal Erosion Processes (MSforCEP) presents an international collection of papers related to the implementation of various management strategies for coastal erosion under specific objectives.

Read More

Sand volcanos on a flat and sandy beach in the Netherlands; By Bert Buizer, PhD

May 1st, 2018

In 2013, some interesting water escape structures were observed near the coastal resort of Bergen aan Zee, in the Netherlands.

Read More

Archive / Beach Of The Month