Surfing Tags / Beach of the Month

Faroe Islands; By Adam Griffith

The Faroe Islands are a group of small volcanic islands that lie between Iceland and Norway in the northern Atlantic. Still unknown to many people, the Faroe Islands have become more familiar to some recently due to a variety of media mentions.

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Quendale Beach, Shetland Islands, UK; By Joe Kelley

Quendale Beach is on the southern side Mainland, the largest of island in the Shetlands. The Shetland Islands, of course, are a part of Scotland, though they are usually shown on an inset map of the UK because they are farther north than parts of Norway. This is a treeless landscape with strong winds and large waves during storms. The Quendale Beach is a beautiful and tranquil, however, with visitors who prefer solitude to glitz …

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Beachfront Development along the Pacific Coast of Colombia: A good thing? By Orrin H. Pilkey & William J. Neal

When we were studying the Colombia’s Pacific Coast barrier islands, we visited a couple of small villages perched on the edge of rapidly eroding beaches. At first the high-risk location of these villages didn’t make any sense to us. Why should the locals live so dangerously? After a few days, however, we began to understand…

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Padre Island National Seashore, Texas; By Katie McDowell Peek

Stretching 80 miles along the Texas shore is Padre Island National Seashore, the world’s longest stretch of undeveloped barrier island…

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Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia USA; By Chester W. Jackson Jr. & Carol Ruckdeschel

With a barrier island shorescape composed of kilometers of dune ridges, expansive maritime forest, and dynamic shorelines, Cumberland Island is a complex landscape fashioned by natural processes intertwined with a history of human and non-native biological impacts.

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D-Day’s Legacy Sands, Omaha Beach; By Earle F. McBride & M. Dane Picard

Before dawn on June 6, 1944, more than 160,000 Allied troops began storming the shores of Normandy, France, in what would be the turning point of World War II. Troops poured out of planes and off ships along an 80-kilometer stretch of coastline. Omaha Beach sand retains evidence of the Invasion…

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Motu One, Tubuai, French Polynesia; By Andrew Cooper

Most motus are quite well vegetated, but one small example at Tubuai is completely bare and composed of a white coral sand beach. Called Motu One (pronounced O-nay), it is barely 250m long and 50m wide and is located on the reef crest on the north side of Tubuai, a small island in the Austral Island Group of French Polynesia, about 600km south of Tahiti…

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Playa Mar Chiquita, Puerto Rico; Pablo A. Llerandi-Román

Playa Mar Chiquita, or the beach of the small sea, is located near the eastern end of the long ridge of eolianite exposed on the coast of Manatí in northern Puerto Rico, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) west of San Juan. Playa Mar Chiquita was once a popular secluded beach with a beautiful setting of palm trees, golden sand, and the imposing ridge of pitted eolianite that serves as a contrasting background for the blue clear sky, blue water, and sand…

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Isles Bay Beach, Montserrat; Katie Peek & Robert Young

Isles Bay Beach is a small, embayed beach located on the western side of the Caribbean Island of Montserrat. This mountainous island is a British oversees territory, less than 20 square miles in area and dominated primarily by the Soufriere Hill Volcano.

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More / Beach Of The Month

Big Talbot Island’s Blackrock Trail; By Cecelia Dailey

May 1st, 2019

The locals call it “lava beach”—a misnomer which leads some to believe the unique formation found here are igneous in origin. But these mystifying “black rocks” crumble to the touch, staining the hands, feeling gritty with sand. Although many are black, these “rocks” are sometimes light colored, deep red or burnt brown.

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Terraces and Towns; By Gary Griggs

April 1st, 2019

The geologic history of California’s north coast is evident in the typically steep relief and coastal landforms. This is an area where a drive along much of the narrow lanes of State Highway One along the often steep coast is always an adventure and where it’s never wise to take your eyes off the road for very long. Most of the beaches occur at the mouths of the coastal streams.

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A Special Beach: Nauthólsvík Geothermal Beach, Iceland; By Norma J. Longo & Orrin H. Pilkey

February 1st, 2019

Iceland is a land of black beaches, usually with a large gravel component. But one Icelandic beach near Reykjavík is different.

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“Beach Robbers”; By Charles O. Pilkey

December 1st, 2018

“Beach Robbers”, is a book chapter written and illustrated by Charles O. Pilkey, excerpted from “The Magic Dolphin: A Young Human’s Guide to Beaches, Sea Level Rise and Living with the Sea” by Charles O. Pilkey with Orrin H. Pilkey.

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California’s Coastal Harbors, Beach Compartments and Sand Dredging; By Gary Griggs

October 1st, 2018

Every year the dredge at the Santa Cruz Small Craft Harbor along central California’s northern Monterey Bay sucks up about 250,000 cubic yards of sand, on average, from the entrance channel and pumps it out onto Twin Lakes Beach where it continues its journey down coast. If it were put in dump trucks, it would fill about 25,000 of them, but the waves can move all that sand without any human labor, and without any noise or carbon emissions.

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Beyond Preservation: The Coral Restoration Foundation Bonaire; By Andrew Jalbert

August 1st, 2018

When avid scuba diver and famed Jurassic Park author Michael Crichton first visited Bonaire decades ago, he eloquently described the underwater environment as, “a world of riotous, outrageous color.” Years later, Bonaire has seen some changes but his assessment still largely rings true.

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Management Strategies for Coastal Erosion Processes; By Nelson Rangel-Buitrago

June 1st, 2018

The Special Issue Management Strategies for Coastal Erosion Processes (MSforCEP) presents an international collection of papers related to the implementation of various management strategies for coastal erosion under specific objectives.

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Sand volcanos on a flat and sandy beach in the Netherlands; By Bert Buizer, PhD

May 1st, 2018

In 2013, some interesting water escape structures were observed near the coastal resort of Bergen aan Zee, in the Netherlands.

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