Tag Archives: Erosion

Experts contradict govt on coastal erosion, Thailand


Photograph: © SAF – Coastal Care

Excerpts;

Coastal erosion in Thailand is getting worse, not better, as had been earlier announced by the Department of Marine and Coastal Resources.

Experts reported that about 830 kilometres, or 30 per cent, of all coastlines in Thailand were at critical levels for erosion at a rate of more than five metres per year. This is far worse than stated in information from the coastal resources department, which recently said only 145 kilometres out of a total 3,000 kilometres of shoreline were regarded as critical areas for erosion…

Read Full Article; The Nation (02-28-2018)

Sinking land will exacerbate flooding from sea level rise in Bay Area

coastal-erosion-sloat-ocean-beach
Severe coastal erosion, Ocean Beach at Sloat, San Francisco, California. Photo source: ©© Shields

Excerpts;

Hazard maps use estimated sea level rise due to climate change to determine flooding risk for today’s shoreline, but don’t take into account that some land is sinking.

A precise study of subsidence around San Francisco Bay shows that for conservative estimates of sea level rise, twice the area is in danger of flooding by 2100 than previously thought. Some landfill is sinking 10 mm per year, threatening the airport and parts of Silicon Valley…

Read Full Article, Science Daily (03-07-2018)

Sinking Atlantic Coastline Meets Rapidly Rising Seas; Climate Central (04-15-2016)
Geological changes along the East Coast are causing land to sink along the seaboard. That’s exacerbating the flood-inducing effects of sea level rise, which has been occurring faster in the western Atlantic Ocean than elsewhere in recent years…

New Study Finds Sea Level Rise Accelerating; NASA (02-13-2018)
Global sea level rise is accelerating incrementally over time rather than increasing at a steady rate, as previously thought, according to a new study based on 25 years of NASA and European satellite data…

Series of storms more than 150 years ago caused extensive erosion of the Carpinteria Salt Marsh


Santa barbara coast. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care.

Excerpts;

Flooding isn’t new to the Santa Barbara coastline. However, the inundation doesn’t always come from the mountains as it did last month in Montecito. Back in 1861-2, a series of large storms washed beach sand more than a quarter mile inland into what today is the Carpinteria Salt Marsh.

Although historical accounts document the inland flooding, little has been known about how those storms impacted a now heavily developed California coast…

Read Full Article; Science Daily (02-26-2018)

Natural Response; UCSB News Current (02-20-2018)

Trucking Mud to the Beaches Means More Sand but Dirtier Waters, CA; Santa Barbara Independent (02-08-2018)
When Santa Barbara County dumps tons of mud from the catastrophic debris flow of January 9 on the shores of Goleta and Carpinteria, this wasn’t like anything that’s happened before. So residents are asking, “Will there be long-term effects? Might there be other locations that can share the impacts..?”

King Tides, Beach Erosion and Water Pollution—Can Waikīkī Be Saved?


Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care.
“Development is absolutely responsible for the majority of the beach nourishment,” Andrew Coburn, assistant director of The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University, said. “Well over 99 percent of the shorelines that are nourished are developed so there is some economic value placed behind them.”

Excerpts;

More than a century ago, Waikīkī was the center of government and culture for Hawaiians, where streams met the ocean and fishponds provided food for chiefs. By the late 1800s, this stunning shoreline started to lure visitors, creating a demand for accommodations on the beach. This development, which included the construction of seawalls, groins and piers, prompted the eroding of the very beach that had been attracting tourists…

Read Full Article; Honolulu Magazine (02-12-2018)

‘Sand mattress’ technology to combat Mother Nature at Kuhio Beach; KHON News (12-17-2017)
Erosion in Waikiki has been a long-time concern and the City and County of Honolulu is once again looking for solutions to combat the problem…

Hawaii bill to restore Waikiki Beach; The News & Observer (03-03-2016)

Waikiki Beach Is Totally Man-Made And Disappearing. Can Hawaii Save It?Huffington Green (03-10-2015)

Waikiki Beach Eroding Less Than A Year After $2.2M Sand Restoration, Pacific Business News (01-24-2013)
A section of Hawaii’s famed Waikiki Beach is starting to erode, less than a year after the completion of a $2.2 million project to replenish the sand on about 1,730 feet of shoreline that had been suffering from chronic erosion.

Sand Moved To Cover Waikiki Beach Erosion Swept Away, Hawaii News Video (11-25-2013)

Doubling of Coastal Erosion by Mid-Century in Hawai’i, Science Daily (03-24-2015)
Chronic erosion dominates the sandy beaches of Hawai’i, causing beach loss as it damages homes, infrastructure, and critical habitat. Researchers have long understood that global sea level rise will affect the rate of coastal erosion. However, new research indicates that coastal erosion of Hawai’i’s beaches may double by mid-century…

Scientists Urge Shoreline Retreat From Hawaii’s Eroding Beaches, EE News
Sea-level rise is a significant factor in the major shoreline change underway in Hawaii, where 52 to 72 percent of beaches on the chain of islands have eroded over the past century.

70 Percent of Beaches Eroding On Hawaiian Islands Kauai, Oahu, and Maui, USGS (Uploaded 05-08-2012)

Hawaii’s Beaches Are in Retreat, and Its Way of Life May Follow, The New York Times

Living on the shores of Hawaii: natural hazards, the environment, and our communities, A book by Chip Fletcher; Robynne Boyd, William J. Neal and Virginia Tice.
“Living on the shores of Hawaii: natural hazards, the environment, and our communities” addresses a wide range of environmental concerns within the context of sustainability and their influence on the future of Hawaii…

waikiki-beach-re-nourishment
Waikiki Beach Restoration, 2012. Photo source: ©© Rekishi no tabi

Shore towns use sand dredged from inlets to widen beaches

inlet-hatteras
Hurricane Irene Opened New Inlets on Hatteras Island. Photograph courtesy of: Rob Young and Andy Coburn, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, Western Carolina University

Excerpts;

Coastal areas around the country are dredging clogged inlets to make them easier and safer to navigate, and using the sand they suck from the bottom to widen beaches damaged by natural erosion or serious storms.

Concerns that have arisen from inlet dredging include possibly disturbing wildlife habitat, or affecting the shape of nearby shorelines.

Despite those concerns, inlet dredging and beach restoration have gone hand-in-hand along much of America’s coastline…

Read Full Article; ABC News (02-11-2018)

The Benefits Of Inlets Opened During Coastal Storms (03-21-2013)
An open letter from the community of coastal scientists regarding the benefits of inlets opened during coastal storms…

East Florida’s Barrier Islands: Natural vs. Man-Made; By Dr. Charles W. Finkl (©-2014)
Florida is world famous for its white sandy beaches, yet many if not most of the beaches in southeast Florida have been renourished. That is, they are man-made beaches that are periodically replenished with sand dredged from the floor of the ocean. In spite of the fact that most beachgoers are unaware that many Florida beaches are artificial, even more people do not realize that the barrier islands along the southeast Florida shore are man-made coastal features, much larger and more imposing than the beach itself.

Coastal geologist criticizes beach renourishment efforts; By Robert S. Young, PhD; The State (08-17-2016)
Rob Young, who heads the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University, said the government is subsidizing coastal development with renourishment money – and that’s costing taxpayers. Communities across the country have spent millions of dollars renourishing beaches. Those efforts encourage people to rebuild after every major hurricane…

Is Beach Renourishment Worth The Money? WWAY News (02-16-2015)

Economy Winner, Environment Loser in Renourishment; Pensacola News Journal (12-02-2015)

New Federal Study: Dredging is harming more endangered fish; WSAV (10-31-2017)
A study from the National Marine Fisheries Service says a few more endangered sturgeon and sea turtles have been killed as a result of the dredging in the Savannah River…

Beach replenishment may have far reaching impacts on ecosystems;” Phys.Org (03-29-2016)
UC San Diego biologists who examined the biological impact of replenishing eroded beaches with offshore sand found that such beach replenishment efforts could have long-term negative impacts on coastal ecosystems…

Study: Sand nourishment linked to fewer marine life, Palm Beach Daily News (04-2016)
A recent study examining the impact of beach nourishment projects on marine life should provoke further research by local scientists, according to a Palm Beach Atlantic University biologist…

“North Carolina: The Beaches Are Moving,” A Video featuring Orrin Pilkey, PhD
World famous coastal geologist Orrin H. Pilkey takes us to the beach and explains why erosion has become a problem…

Let’s end war with ocean, Op-Ed by Orrin H. Pilkey
The immediate future most certainly holds more miles of sandbags, resulting in more narrowed and ugly beaches.But this trend can be halted and reversed. Now is the time to make peace with the ocean.The time is now to stop sandbagging, both physically with no more shore-hardening structures, and politically with no more exceptions to the intent of the rules, no more undermining existing legislation, and a return to enforcement…

Slowly but surely, South Carolina’s incredibly complex shoreline is losing ground


Cape Island in foreground, Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, South Carolina. Photograph courtesy of: Mary Edna Fraser, 2006 ©.

Excerpts;

More than half of South Carolina’s shoreline is eroding under an onslaught of rising seas, pounding storms and other scouring forces.

These and other recent findings cast new light on the nature and fate of our coast…

Read Full Article; Post and Courrier (02-11-2018)

South Carolina not doing enough to protect beaches, report says; Post and Courrier (11-07-2017)
South Carolina’s beach preparations are barely adequate to deal with worsening erosion, sea rise and intensifying storms, according to the latest Surfriders Foundation report…

Battling erosion an endless job for South Carolina beach towns; Post And Courier (04-23-2017)
In South Carolina, beach renourishment is a never-ending job…

Coastal erosion needs our attention, South Coast Today (01-04-2016)

Robert Young: Seaward of Common Sense? SC Needs to Put an End to Building on the Beach, The State (02-11-2015)
South Carolina’s beautiful beaches are a vital component of this state’s economy. Managing them wisely is critical to the health of the economy and to ensuring that state and local tax dollars are not wasted on futile efforts to protect homes needlessly placed in areas of obvious high hazard…

Coastal geologist criticizes beach renourishment efforts; By Robert S. Young, PhD; The State (08-17-2016)
Rob Young, who heads the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University, said the government is subsidizing coastal development with renourishment money – and that’s costing taxpayers. Communities across the country have spent millions of dollars renourishing beaches. Those efforts encourage people to rebuild after every major hurricane…

Rethinking Living Shorelines, By Orrin H. Pilkey, Rob Young, Norma Longo, and Andy Coburn;Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines / Western Carolina University, March 1, 2012, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University
In response to the detrimental environmental impacts caused by traditional erosion control structures, environmental groups, state and federal resource management agencies, now advocate an approach known as “Living Shorelines”that embraces the use of natural habitat elements such as indigenous vegetation, to stabilize and protect eroding shorelines.

Life’s a beach: Cannes ships in sand for film festival


Cannes, Côte d’Azur, France: ©© Franck Michel

Excerpts;

Every year the French Riviera town of Cannes rolls out the red carpet to A-list celebrities at the world’s most glamorous film festival. Now it wants to roll out a bigger beach too.

The Mediterranean resort is shipping in 80,000 cubic meters of white sand – enough to fill 32 Olympic swimming pools – to widen the beach along a 1.4 kilometer (0.9 mile) stretch of seafront beside the famed “Croisette” promenade…

Read Full Article; Reuters (01-30-2018)

A Cannes, les plages de la Croisette sont élargies avec 80.000 m3 de sable (01-24-2018)

The sands of time; The New York Times (12-15-2017)
Human intervention to control beach depth is often futile. Repeated studies have found that sand pumped onto beaches in order to protect coastal property may be washed out by a storm or two. These beaches commonly lose all the new sand in five years or so…

Sand washes away as quickly as it can be dumped, Bathtub Beach, FL; TCPalm News (11-17-2017)

Coastal geologist criticizes beach renourishment efforts; By Robert S. Young, PhD; The State (08-17-2016)
Rob Young, who heads the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University, said the government is subsidizing coastal development with renourishment money – and that’s costing taxpayers. Communities across the country have spent millions of dollars renourishing beaches. Those efforts encourage people to rebuild after every major hurricane…

Beach replenishment may have far reaching impacts on ecosystems;” Phys.Org (03-29-2016)
UC San Diego biologists who examined the biological impact of replenishing eroded beaches with offshore sand found that such beach replenishment efforts could have long-term negative impacts on coastal ecosystems…

Sand, Rarer Than One Thinks: A UNEP report (GEA-March 2014)
Despite the colossal quantities of sand and gravel being used, our increasing dependence on them and the significant impact that their extraction has on the environment, this issue has been mostly ignored by policy makers and remains largely unknown by the general public.
In March 2014 The United Nations released its first Report about sand mining. “Sand Wars” film documentary by Denis Delestrac – first broadcasted on the european Arte Channel, May 28th, 2013, where it became the highest rated documentary for 2013 – expressly inspired the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to publish this 2014-Global Environmental Alert.

Sand Wars, An Investigation Documentary, By Multi Award-Winning Filmmaker Denis Delestrac (©-2013)
As of 2011-2012, when investigative filmmaker Denis Delestrac and team, were collecting and unveiling sand mining datas and information from the professionals involved, “…the sand business was estimated to be a $70 billion industry, worldwide…!”—Denis Delestrac (©-2013)

More oyster reefs could help fight erosion on Texas coast

oyster-reef-conservation
A submerged breakwater reef was created along two stretches of shoreline, protecting more than 18 acres of habitat for submerged aquatic vegetation and creating almost two acres of oyster reef. When all is said and done, the submerged reefs will protect more than a mile of coastal habitat by reflecting erosive wave energy away from the shoreline, unlike traditional erosion protection structures that contribute to habitat loss. Oyster Restoration, in Alabama. Captions and Photo source: NOAA Fisheries

Excerpts;

The Texas Parks & Wildlife Department in the past 10 years has built more than 400 acres of oyster reef off the coast — multimillion dollar projects intended to jump start the harvest of oysters, particularly after hurricanes and drought devastated the resource…

Read Full Article, Star Telegram (01-22-2018)

The Texas Coastline Is Slowly Disappearing. Here’s How One Community Is Coping; Houston Public Media (01-02-2018)
The Lone Star State’s shoreline is experiencing one of the highest rates of land loss of any coastal area in the country due to a combination of subsidence, sea level rise and storm surges…

An Oyster in the Storm, Op Ed by Paul Greenberg, The New York Times (11-02-2012)

The Great American Oyster Collapse; AlJazeera (07-21-2014)
Scientists have linked climate change and pollution of the world’s oceans to problems with oysters and corals, and there are still questions about how other species of ocean life will be affected…

Looking to Holland to find more sand for Galveston Island, Texas; HPM University of Houston (08-30-2016)

Hyams Beach, Australia: Beach with the whitest sand in the world


Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

The whitest sand in the world: it’s a claim to fame Hyams Beach on Australia’s New South Wales South Coast has enjoyed for years, even securing it a place in the Guinness World Records.

Luckily, even the most nitpicking visitor to Hyams cannot complain – the sand is indeed whiter than white and the only problem you may encounter is in the “on season” when you might have to head to the far end of the beach to spot enough patches of the famous grains between the bods on the shore…

Read Full Article, STUFF (01-16-2018)

Sand Color Palette
Most beach sand color ranges from pale cream to golden to caramel, but in select places around the world, sand can be red, pink, orange, chocolate, gold, purple, green, or black…

The Colors Of Beach Sand; By Gary Griggs

Most beautiful black sand beaches in the World; Condé Nast Traveler (08-02-2017)

Star Sand Beach In Iriomote Island, Japan; WhenOnEarth (02-23-2015)

Scientist Finds ‘Hawaiian Beach’ Sand On Mars, Phys Org (10-28-2013)

A Grain of Sand – Nature’s Secret Wonder, A Book By Dr. Gary Greenberg
Every grain of sand is a jewel waiting to be discovered. That’s what Dr. Gary Greenberg found when he first turned his microscope on beach sand. Author and photographer Dr. Gary Greenberg is a visual artist who creatively combines art with science. Since 2001, Dr. Greenberg focuses his microscopes on common objects, such as grains of sand, flowers, and food. These everyday objects take on a new reality when magnified hundreds of times, revealing hidden and unexpected aspects of nature. Dr. Greenberg’s images of sand make us realize that as we walk along a beach we are strolling upon thousands of years of biological and geological history…