Tag Archives: Erosion

Costa Rica’s Caribbean Coast Pools Efforts Against Climate Change


Beach erosion, Manzanillo, Costa Rica. Photo courtesy of: © Denis Delestrac

Excerpts;

As in the rest of the Caribbean region, Costa Rica is suffering coastal erosion due to a rise in the sea level, which jeopardises the sandy beaches as well as the tourism-based economy of coastal areas…

Read Full Article; IPS News (07-24-2017)

The Greater Caribbean Raises Funds to Protect its Sandy Coasts; IPS News (07-01-2017)
Almost no Caribbean beach escapes erosion, a problem that scientific sources describe as extensive and irreversible in these ecosystems of high economic interest, that work as protective barriers for life inland…

The Greater Caribbean Raises Funds to Protect its Sandy Coasts


Beach erosion, Manzanillo, Costa Rica. Photo courtesy of: © Denis Delestrac

Excerpts;

Almost no Caribbean beach escapes erosion, a problem that scientific sources describe as extensive and irreversible in these ecosystems of high economic interest, that work as protective barriers for life inland…

Read Full Article, IPS News (07-01-2017)

Caribbean Scientists Work to Limit Climate Impact on Marine Environment; IPS News (04-28-2017)

Addressing Climate Change On Several Fronts In The Caribbean, Video, IPS News (03-18-2016)
Climate change is already affecting the Caribbean. But there is concern that a gap still exists between what the region’s leaders are saying about the issue and what residents believe…

Caribbean Forced to Choose Between Climate Change Impact and Development Goals, IPS News (05-21-2014)

“We in the Caribbean Are Living Climate Change”, IPS News (12-10-2013)

Alliance between the Arctic and Tropics (02-2011)
No wonder “you melt, we sink” is the nightmare that unites 43 small developing island nations of the world, and Arctic organizations in their fight against climate change through a coalition called called Many Strong Voices.
Like the Arctic, small island nations account for a tiny percentage of world energy consumption and produce low levels of climate-warming greenhouse gas emissions. Yet they’re already threatened by the same kind of unpredictable weather, storms and erosion due to the changing climate that has some Alaskan villages relocating inland…

Can New Reef Design Save Historic Shoreline?

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Coastal restoration, living shorelines. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

A new design of artificial oyster reef-maker could buck the trend on where living shorelines best work.

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Institute of Marine Sciences, or IMS, are introducing a type of reef that may withstand high-energy wave action areas typically deemed unsuitable for natural shoreline stabilization.

Living shoreline projects are built with various structural and organic materials such as plants, submerged aquatic vegetation, oyster shells and stone. They generally work best along sheltered coasts such as estuaries, bays, lagoons and coastal deltas, where wave energy is low to moderate.

This month, researchers will put to the test a series of reef platforms that are going to be installed as part of what is, to date, the longest state-permitted living shoreline project in North Carolina…

Read Full Article, Coastal Review (06-06-2017)

Living shorelines a more natural approach to preventing coastal erosion, WNCT (05-18-2016)

Living Shorelines: Better Than Bulkheads, Coastal Review Online (02-08-2016)
More than 14,000 miles – 14 percent of continental U.S. coastline — has been armored with hardened structures. Hardened structures cause elevated rates of erosion on the shoreward side of the structure…

NOAA Study Finds Marshes, Reefs, Beaches Can Enhance Coastal Resilience, NOAA (04-29-2015)

NOAA study finds ‘living shorelines’ can lessen climate change’s effects, NOAA (12-22-2015)

Rethinking Living Shorelines, By Orrin H. Pilkey, Rob Young, Norma Longo, and Andy Coburn;Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines / Western Carolina University, March 1, 2012, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University
In response to the detrimental environmental impacts caused by traditional erosion control structures, environmental groups, state and federal resource management agencies, now advocate an approach known as “Living Shorelines”that embraces the use of natural habitat elements such as indigenous vegetation, to stabilize and protect eroding shorelines.

“Engineering away our natural defenses: An analysis of shoreline hardening in the US,” A Study by By Rachel K. Pittman, ResearchGate (08-08-2015)
Rapid coastal population growth and development are primary drivers of marine habitat degradation. Although shoreline hardening, a byproduct of development, can accelerate erosion and loss of beaches and tidal wetlands, it is a common practice globally. 22,842 km of continental U.S. shoreline, 14% of the total, has been hardened…

Landslide buries California’s scenic highway in Big Sur


Pacific coast. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

A monster of a landslide has buried a quarter-mile section of the scenic coastal highway in California’s Big Sur region, piling fresh misery on a remote area that hasn’t seen the road fully passable for months…

Read Full Article, CNN (05-24-2017)

Beach bashing: Last year’s El Niño resulted in unprecedented erosion of Pacific coastline, Science Daily (02-14-2017)

Disappearing Beaches: Modeling Shoreline Change in Southern California; USGS (03-27-2017)

Worst erosion in 150 years tears 180 feet from SF’s Ocean Beach; SF Gate (02-15-2017)
The beaches lining the coast between Mexico and Canada form a protective barrier that keeps the turbulent ocean from eating away at seaside cliffs and flooding low-lying coastal towns and cities, scientists say…

Irish beach washed away 33 years ago reappears overnight after freak tide


Dooagh Village, Achill Island, on the shores of the Atlantic Ocean. County Mayo, West Ireland, 2014. Photo source: ©© Douglas Pfeiffer Cardoso

Excerpts;

An Irish beach that disappeared more than 30 years ago has returned to an island off the County Mayo coast.

The sand at Dooagh, Achill Island, was washed away by storms in 1984, leaving only rocks and rock pools…

Read Full Article; Guardian UK (05-08-2017)

See How The N.C. Coast Has Changed In 30 Years

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Coastal erosion, North Carolina – NC12. Photo source: ©© NCDOTcommunications

Excerpts;

North Carolina Sea Grant, using Google satellite imaging, looked at coastal erosion dating back to 1984…

Read Full Article, WUNC (04-03-2017)

Read Full Article, WUNC (04-03-2017)

Let’s end war with ocean, Op-Ed by Orrin H. Pilkey
The immediate future most certainly holds more miles of sandbags, resulting in more narrowed and ugly beaches.But this trend can be halted and reversed. Now is the time to make peace with the ocean.The time is now to stop sandbagging, both physically with no more shore-hardening structures, and politically with no more exceptions to the intent of the rules, no more undermining existing legislation, and a return to enforcement…

Sandbagging at the Shore: North Carolina’s Coastal Sand Bags and Political Sandbaggers; By William Neal, Orrin Pilkey & Norma Longo;

Rethinking Living Shorelines, By Orrin H. Pilkey, Rob Young, Norma Longo, and Andy Coburn;Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines / Western Carolina University, March 1, 2012, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University
In response to the detrimental environmental impacts caused by traditional erosion control structures, environmental groups, state and federal resource management agencies, now advocate an approach known as “Living Shorelines”that embraces the use of natural habitat elements such as indigenous vegetation, to stabilize and protect eroding shorelines.

In rare move, one South Florida city sues another in battle over beach erosion

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Beach renourishment, Florida. Image source: ©© Florida Sea Grant
“Beach nourishment projects like this have become commonplace along the US East and Gulf Coasts. These projects have immediate environmental impacts through burial of nearshore habitat and increased turbidity during project placement.The cumulative environmental impacts of doing this repeatedly on the same beach while conducting projects from Maine to Texas is unknown. But, we should be concerned. ” —Robert S. Young, PhD, Director, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, Professor, Coastal Geology, Western Carolina University.

Excerpts;

A spat over sand in adjacent cities finally landed in court this week, and it already has cost taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars…

Read Full Article, Sun Sentinel (04-26-2017)

Column: The future of Florida’s beaches and the public’s right to know; Op Ed. by Orrin Pilkey (12-07-2015)

Reinforce and Build: The vicious cycle driving development on Florida’s most fragile beaches; by John Platt, Hakai Magazine (12-20-2016)

Miami’s fight against rising seas, BBC (04-04-2017)
In the battle against rising seas, Florida – which has more to lose than almost anywhere else in the world – is becoming ground zero…

A swath of Miami Beach was washing away. The fix? Dump 285,000 tons of sand on it; Miami Herald (03-28-2017)

Army Corps Beach Erosion Fix Would Cost $43.4M; Miami Herald (04-16-2014)
The Army Corps of Engineers said it will be expensive to fix beach erosion problems along Flagler County’s shoreline, Florida. A report estimates it will cost $43.4 million over 50 years to create a 10-foot seaward extension of existing dune and berm…

Shrinking Shores: Florida reneges on pledges to its beaches; The Naples Daily News (11-17-2016)
The shores shrink, the tourists scatter, the tax base shrivels. That’s what troubles many communities across the state forced to shoulder the expensive burden of beach renourishment…

Sand’s end, The Verge (11-17-2016)
Miami Beach has run out of sand. Now what?..

Developers don’t get it: climate change means we need to retreat from the coast, Guardian UK (15-03-2016)
It is preposterous to build in areas that are bound to flood. So why are real estate companies still doing it?..

Atlantic City and Miami Beach: two takes on tackling the rising waters; Guardian UK (03-20-2017)

When rising seas transform risk into certainty; The New York Times (04-18-2017)

“Retreat from a Rising Sea: Hard Choices in an Age of Climate Change,” A book by Orrin H. Pilkey, Linda Pilkey-Jarvis, and Keith C. Pilkey
“Retreat from a Rising Sea: Hard Choices in an Age of Climate Change” is a big-picture, policy-oriented book that explains in gripping terms, what rising oceans will do to coastal cities and the drastic actions we must take now to remove vulnerable populations.

Sea levels rose faster in 20th century than in previous 2,700 years, says study; CNN (02-23-2016)
Scientists have modeled a history of the planet’s sea levels spanning back 3,000 years, and concluded that the rate of increase last century “was extremely likely faster than during any of the 27 previous centuries.”

Nicaragua’s South Caribbean Coast Improves Readiness for Climate Change


Photograph: © SAF – Coastal Care

Excerpts;

The effects of climate change have hit Nicaragua’s Caribbean coastal regions hard in the last decade and have forced the authorities and local residents to take protection and adaptation measures to address the phenomenon that has gradually undermined their safety and changed their way of life…

Read Full Article; IPS News (04-22-2017)

Warning from IDB expert: Trinidad is shrinking


Coastal erosion, Trinidad. Captions and Photo source: ©© Amanda

Excerpts;

Trinidad is shrinking and changing as it becomes increasingly vulnerable to storms, flooding and other natural disasters which cause coastal erosion and the retreating of the shoreline.

In Columbus Bay, in West Trinidad, the coastline has retreated by 150 metres since 1994, losing 6.5 hectares of land…

Read Full Article, Trinidad and Tobago Guardian (04-16-2017)

Sinking into Paradise: Climate Change Worsening Coastal Erosion in Trinidad; IPS News (11-24-2015)