Tag Archives: Hurricane

Rare Tropical Cyclone Strikes Somalia

somalia-cyclone
The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired this image of the cyclone on November 11, 2013, well after the storm came ashore. Image: Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE/EOSDIS MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC.

By Holli Riebeek, Earth Observatory / NASA,

Even as the devastating impact of Typhoon Haiyan began to emerge in the Philippines, Somalia too experienced one of the deadliest tropical cyclones in its history. Tropical Cyclone 3A moved over Puntland, Somalia, on November 10–11, 2013, causing flash floods that left more than 100 dead. The storm destroyed hundreds of homes and thousands of livestock, according to news reports.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired this image of the cyclone on November 11, 2013, well after the storm came ashore. At its strongest, Tropical Cyclone 3A had winds of 74 kilometers (46 miles) per hour, making it the equivalent of a weak tropical storm.

As the storm moved ashore, it was forecast to dump 100-200 millimeters (4-8 inches) of rain, with potentially higher amounts in some regions. The average annual rainfall in Puntland ranges from less than 100 mm (4 inches) to 200 mm (8 inches).

Cyclones are unusual in Somalia. Tropical Cyclone 3A is just the fifth storm to strike the country since records began in 1966, wrote meteorologist Jeff Masters. The last cyclone to come ashore over Somalia was Tropical Cyclone Murjan on October 25, 2012.

Original Article, Earth Observatory / NASA

Somalia’s Cyclone-Hit Puntland Declared A Disaster area, BBC News
The cyclone had swept through the Eyl, Beyla, Dangorayo and Hafun districts along the eastern coast and across to Alula at the tip of the Horn of Africa…

Deadly, Rare Tropical Cyclone Hits Somalia, LiveScience
Weak storms such as Cyclone 3A can wreak havoc along the arid African coast because they trigger flash floods. Only one or two tropical cyclones strike Somalia every decade, but records only go back for about 30 years. However, the intensity of storms in the Arabian Sea appears to be increasing due to aerosol pollution…

Hurricane? Cyclone? Typhoon? Here’s The Difference, by Seith Borenstein, AP

Aid Efforts Begin After Typhoon Haiyan Kills 10,000 in Philippines

bopha-phil
A scene behind the municipal hall of Cateel, Davao Oriental, Philippines, after Typhoon Bopha pass the area in early December 2012. Captions and Photo source: ©© International Organization for Migration

Excerpts;

Estimated death toll soars as path of destruction leaves many parts of Philippines inaccessible to government and aid officials…

SEE: How to help Typhoon Haiyan survivors, CNN

Read Full Article, Guardian UK

Sunday’s developments, Guardian UK
So far 10,000 people are estimated to have died in the Philippines from super typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms ever recorded, which reportedly destroyed around three-quarters of the area of Leyte province. The extent of the damage and death toll will likely take many days to assess, and could well rise significantly, especially as the still-strong weather system heads across the South China Sea into Vietnam…

Typhoon Haiyan: Surging Sea Blamed For Countless Deaths, ABC News

Super-Typhoon Haiyan Maintain Strength Crossing Philippines

haiyan-typhoon
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this infrared, false-colored image of Super-Typhoon Haiyan exiting the western Philippines on Nov. 8 at 04:59 UTC. Purple indicates coldest, most powerful thunderstorms with heavy rainfall potential. Image Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen

By Rob Gutro / NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center;

Super-Typhoon Haiyan slammed into the eastern Philippines as the strongest tropical cyclone of the year, and today, Nov. 8, is exiting the country and moving into the South China Sea. NASA’s Aqua satellite captured visible and infrared data of Hiayan after it made landfall near Leyete, identifying the extent of its power.

The U.S. Navy’s Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that just before Super-Typhoon Haiyan made landfall its maximum sustained winds were 314 kph/195 mph, with gusts up to 379 kph/235 mph. PAGASA, the Philippines Weather organization noted that Hiayan’s maximum sustained winds at landfall were near 234 kph/145 mph.
On Nov. 7 at 2100 UTC/4 p.m. EDT/Nov. 8 at 5 a.m. Philippines local time, Super-Typhoon Haiyan had maximum sustained winds near 170 knots/ 195.6 mph/314.8 kph. It was located about 543 nautical miles east-southeast of Manila at that time.

As Super-Typhoon Haiyan moved over the central Philippines on Nov. 8 at 05:10 UTC/12:10 a.m. EDT, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured a visible image. The image showed that Haiyan maintained its structure as it moved over the east central Philippines. As the center moved through the eastern Visayas, large, thick bands of thunderstorms spiraled into the center from the northeast. Hiayan’s clouds extended over the entire country from the Cagayan Valley in the north to the Soccsksargen region in the south.

The AIRS instrument that also flies aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured infrared imagery of Super-Typhoon Haiyan exiting the western Philippines. The coldest cloud top temperaetures and most powerful thunderstorms with heavy rainfall potential covered the Visayas, Bicol, National Capital, Central Luzon, Calabarzon, Northern Mindanao, and Mimaropa regions.

By Nov. 8 at 0900 UTC/4 a.m. EDT/5 p.m. Philippines local time, Haiyan’s maximum sustained winds dropped to 145 knots/167 mph/268.5 kph, still making it a powerful Category 5 tropical cyclone on the Saffir-Simpson Scale. It was moving through Western Visayas and was 214 nautical miles south-southeast of Manila. It is moving quickly to the west at 22 knots/25.3 mph/40.74 kph, which will reduce flooding potential.

Many warnings are still in effect today, Nov. 8, as Hiayan continues to exit the western Philippines.
Public storm warning signals have been raised in large areas of the country. In Luzon, Signal #1 was in effect for: Metro Manila, Bataan, Cavite, Rizal, Laguna, Quezon, Camarines provinces, Albay, Sorsogon. Signal #2 is in effect for: Lubang Island, Batangas, Marinduque, rest of Palawan, Burias Island, Masbate and Ticao Island; Signal #3 in effect for the rest of Mindoro provinces, Romblon, rest of northern Palawan including Puerto Princesa City; and Signal #4 is in effect for: extreme northern Palawan, Calamian Group of Islands, southern Occidental and Oriental Mindoro.

In Visayas, Signal #1 remained in effect for: Samar provinces, Leyte provinces, Camotes island, Bohol and Siquijor; while Signal #2 is up for: Negros provinces, Cebu, Biliran Island; and there is no Signal #3, but there is a Signal #4 for Aklan, Capiz, Antique, Iloilo and Guimaras.

In Mindanao, a Signal #1 remained in effect for the Camiguin, Surigao del Norte, Dinagat; and a Signal #2 is up for: Siargao. According to PAGASA, the Philippine authority on meteorology, flashfloods and mudslides are possible in areas under signal #2, 3 and 4. In addition, storm surges of up to 21 feet/~7 meters are possible under a Signal #2.

CNN reported on Nov. 9 that Hiayan left power outages, flooded streets, downed trees, damaged buildings and many canceled flights.

The U.S. Navy’s Joint Typhoon Warning Center in Hawaii said it was the strongest tropical cyclone in the world this year.

Hiayan is forecast to move through the South China Sea and make a final landfall as a strong typhoon in central Vietnam in a couple of days.

Original Article, NASA

Typhoon Haiyan: What Alarms Filipinos Is The World Ignoring Climate Change, Guardian UK
We don’t yet know the death toll or damage done, but we do know that the strength of tropical storms such as Haiyan or Bopha is linked to sea temperature. As the oceans warm with climate change, there is extra energy in the system. Storms may not be increasing in frequency but Pacific ocean waters are warming faster than expected, and there is a broad scientific consensus that typhoons are now increasing in strength…

Super Typhoon Haiyan, One Of Strongest Storms Ever, Heads For Philippines

Super--typhoon-haiyan
The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired this natural color image of Super Typhoon Haiyan as it approached the east coast of the Philippines. The image was acquired at 1:25 p.m. local time (4:25 Universal Time) on November 7, 2013. Captions and image source: Earth Observatory, NASA

Excerpts;

Super Typhoon Haiyan, which is one of the strongest storms in world history based on maximum windspeed, is about to plow through the Central Philippines, producing a potentially deadly storm surge and dumping heavy rainfall that could cause widespread flooding.

The densely populated city of Manila, home to 12 million, is in the storm’s path, although it is predicted to escape the worst of the winds and storm surge…

Read Full Article, Climate Central

Super Typhoon Haiyan, one of strongest storms ever, heads for central Philippines, CNN
With sustained winds of 315 kph (195 mph) and gusts as strong as 380 kph (235 mph), Super Typhoon Haiyan was churning across the Western Pacific toward the central Philippines. Its wind strength makes it equivalent to an exceptionally strong Category 5 hurricane…

Tropical Storm Sonia stronger as it nears Mexico’s Pacific coast

east-cape-baja
Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

Tropical Storm Sonia gained strength as it took aim at the Pacific coast of Mexico on Sunday, threatening intense rains over a large portion of western Mexico that has already experienced major flooding over the past couple of months…

Read Full Article, Reuters

Coastal Watches/Warnings, NOAA

Two Storms Strike Mexico, NASA (Uploaded 98-18-2013)
With 9,330 kilometers (5,800 miles) of coastline surrounded by warm tropical and subtropical waters, Mexico is no stranger to tropical storms. But on September 15-16, 2013, the country experienced a rare double strike as two storms moved ashore simultaneously, one from the Pacific and one from the Atlantic…