Tag Archives: Marine Animals

Hundreds of endangered turtles killed in illegal fishing net


A sea turtle entangled in a derelict net. Photo source: NOAA
“According to NOAA, plastic debris kills an estimated 100,000 marine mammals annually, millions of birds and fishes. The largest pieces of marine plastic debris, miles long discarded fishing nets and lines mostly, take an obvious toll on animals. These derelicts nets, called “ghost nets”, snare and drown thousands of larger sea creatures per year, such as seals, sea lions, dolphins, sea turtles, sharks, dugons, crocodiles, seabirds, crabs, and other creatures. Acting as designed, these nets restrict movement causing starvation, laceration, infection, and, in animals that need to return to the surface to breathe, suffocation.” —Captions: © SAF — Coastal Care.

Excerpts;

About 300 sea turtles have died on Mexico’s southern Pacific coast after they were trapped in an abandoned illegal fishing net…

Read Full Article; CBS News (08-29-2018)

Ghost netting: Image emerges of decomposed turtle wrapped in plastic net; The Independent (08-18-2018)
Pictures taken from the upcoming environmental film Blue, which will be shown at the Ocean Film Festival UK & Ireland Tour, show the horrific effects of plastic pollution and ghost nets on marine life and the world’s oceans…

Marine turtles dying after becoming entangled in plastic rubbish; Science Daily (12-18-2017)
Hundreds of marine turtles die every year after becoming entangled in rubbish in the oceans and on beaches, including plastic ‘six pack’ holders and discarded fishing gear…

60% of Loggerhead Turtles Stranded on Beaches in South Africa Had Ingested Plastic, EcoWatch (05-031-2016)

Sea Turtles Face Plastic Pollution Peril, University of Exeter (10-09-2015)
A new global review that set out to investigate the hazards of marine plastic pollution has warned that all seven species of marine turtles can ingest or become entangled in the discarded debris that currently litters the oceans, and nesting beaches…

The Plastic Found In a Single Turtle’s Stomach, Independent UK (03-24-2011)

New UN report finds marine debris harming more than 800 species, costing countries millions; United Nations (12-05-2016)
Marine debris is negatively affecting more than 800 animal species and causing serious losses to many countries’ economies, according to a United Nations report launched December 5th, 2016…

Decades of chemical pollution suspected in Maine’s seal die-off

seal-california
Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

As the number of dead and stranded seals washing up on southern Maine beaches rises by the day, researchers are linking the sudden die-off to decades of chemical pollution that made the seal population vulnerable to toxins and disease…

Read Full Article, Press Herald (08-19-2018)

Warmer West Coast ocean conditions linked to increased risk of toxic shellfish; NOAA (01-09-2017)
Hazardous levels of domoic acid, a natural toxin that accumulates in shellfish, have been linked to warmer ocean conditions in waters off Oregon and Washington for the first time by a NOAA-supported research team, led by Oregon State University scientists…

Original Study: “PCB pollution continues to impact populations of orcas and other dolphins in European waters,” Scientific Reports (01-14-2016)

Record Number of Seals Are Dying On California Shores; Nature World News (10-02-2015)

Climate Change Hits Sea Lions in the Santa Barbara Channel, SB Independent (04-18-2015)
According to the most recent count prepared by NOAA, 2,460 stranded sea lions ​ ​have been scooped off California beaches during the first three and a half months of 2015. Santa Barbara beaches have been hit especially hard. Given that California’s two main sea lion rookeries are located just off Santa Barbara’s coast ​— ​San Miguel and San Nicolas islands ​— ​that’s not surprising.

Sea Lions Exposed To Toxic Algae At Risk Of Brain Damage and Memory Loss, Nature World News (12-15-2015)

Toxic chemicals found in beached pilot whales in Scotland;Guardian UK (02-11-2016)

Ghost netting: Image emerges of decomposed turtle wrapped in plastic net


A sea turtle entangled in a derelict net. Photo source: NOAA
“According to NOAA, plastic debris kills an estimated 100,000 marine mammals annually, millions of birds and fishes. The largest pieces of marine plastic debris, miles long discarded fishing nets and lines mostly, take an obvious toll on animals. These derelicts nets, called “ghost nets”, snare and drown thousands of larger sea creatures per year, such as seals, sea lions, dolphins, sea turtles, sharks, dugons, crocodiles, seabirds, crabs, and other creatures. Acting as designed, these nets restrict movement causing starvation, laceration, infection, and, in animals that need to return to the surface to breathe, suffocation.” —Captions: © SAF — Coastal Care.

Excerpts;

‘Over the past decade it’s thought that 10,000 turtles have been impacted by the ghost nets off northern Australia alone’…

The picture is taken from the upcoming environmental film Blue, which will be shown at the Ocean Film Festival UK & Ireland Tour.

These pictures show the horrific effects of plastic pollution and ghost nets on marine life and the world’s oceans.

Blue highlights issues faced by marine life around the globe, often in wild and remote places that you would imagine are untouched by the modern world…

Read Full Article, The Independent (08-18-2018)

Marine turtles dying after becoming entangled in plastic rubbish; Science Daily (12-18-2017)
Hundreds of marine turtles die every year after becoming entangled in rubbish in the oceans and on beaches, including plastic ‘six pack’ holders and discarded fishing gear…

60% of Loggerhead Turtles Stranded on Beaches in South Africa Had Ingested Plastic, EcoWatch (05-031-2016)

Sea Turtles Face Plastic Pollution Peril, University of Exeter (10-09-2015)
A new global review that set out to investigate the hazards of marine plastic pollution has warned that all seven species of marine turtles can ingest or become entangled in the discarded debris that currently litters the oceans, and nesting beaches…

The Plastic Found In a Single Turtle’s Stomach, Independent UK (03-24-2011)

Plastics found in stomachs of deepest sea creatures; Guardian UK (11-15-2017)

New UN report finds marine debris harming more than 800 species, costing countries millions; United Nations (12-05-2016)
Marine debris is negatively affecting more than 800 animal species and causing serious losses to many countries’ economies, according to a United Nations report launched December 5th, 2016…

More plastic than fish in the sea by 2050, Guardian UK (01-19-2016)
One refuse truck’s-worth of plastic is dumped into the sea every minute, and the situation is getting worse, according to a new report launched at the World Economic Forum today. New plastics will consume 20% of all oil production within 35 years, up from an estimated 5% today…

Plastic Pollution / The Great Plastic Tide, Coastal Care

Shark Mystery: Where Have South Africa’s Great Whites Gone?

cape-town
CapeTown, South Africa. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care.

Excerpts;

The world’s most famous sharks are the great whites off Cape Town, featured in the popular “Air Jaws” series. But now these sharks have mostly gone missing, and some experts blame a fishery for depleting the smaller sharks that the great whites feed on…

Read Full Article, Yale e360 (08-06-2018)

Sharks, Victims or Perpetrators? IPS News (09-05-2013)
When it comes to humans and sharks, who is predator and who is prey? And what lessons need to be learned when people venture into environments where they are exposed to dangers posed by wildlife?…

How Should We Respond When Humans and Sharks Collide? National Geographic (07-05-2013)

What Should You Do if a Shark Attacks? A) Fight it? B) Play Dead? C) Swim Away? Guardian UK (07-22-2015)

The Teeth Of The Great Debate, by Jock Serong, Coastal Watch
Why shark attack statistics tell us so much, and so little…

Sea turns red with blood after whale hunt in Faroe Islands


Photo source: ©© Inflifeteacher

Excerpts;

Images of a whale hunt in the Faroe Islands 200 miles north of Scotland have sparked renewed anger from conservationists and animal activists.

The pictures show dozens of whales being herded into a bay where they are killed, the sea turning red with their blood…

Read Full Article, CNN (08-17-2018)

Whale hunt in Faroe Islands turns sea red with blood; BBC News (08-16-2018)

Savagery without Borders: Whaling: When the sands turns from white to blood red in the bays; (09-29-2010)
Denmark is involved in a shameful practice. While it may seem incredible, even today a whale slaughtering custom continues, in the Faroe Islands. The sea is stained in red and currently it’s not because of the climate or effects of nature. It is the slaughtering of hundreds of the famous and intelligent Calderon dolphins, which are a type of Pilot whales. An intelligent dolphin that is placid and approaches humans out of friendliness…

In a coastal town, beach owners don’t even want sea turtles trespassing

turtle-tracks-florida
Sea turtle tracks at sunrise, Florida. Photo source: ©© Amy32080

Excerpts;

All over Florida, people are arguing over whether a new law blocks the public from walking across a private beach. Meanwhile, in the tiny but affluent Pinellas town of Belleair Shore, the question of beach access has sparked a somewhat different dispute.

Instead of just humans, some Belleair Shore residents want to give sea turtles the boot too.

Town Commission members are complaining about spotting marked sea turtles nests on their beachfront land — nests that they said had all been put there, without permission, by the Clearwater Marine Aquarium…

Read Full Article; Tampa Bay Times (08-08-2018)

Does new law restrict public access to Florida’s beaches? Miami Herald (04-06-2018)

Who owns Florida’s beaches? Private landowner rights can clash with public beach access; Naples Daily News (11-16-2017)
In a State known for plenty of beautiful shores, the clash over who owns Florida’s beaches pits residents against tourist for access to the sand…

Florida beaches are becoming darker, and that’s good for sea turtles; Science Daily (01-29-2016)

Endangered Green Sea Turtles Return to Florida in Record Numbers, Take Part (01-06-2016)

Successful Conservation Efforts along Florida, Pacific Coasts Recognized in Revised ESA Listing of Green Sea Turtle, NOAA (03-21-2015)

Why the endangered green sea turtle is losing its male population; CBS News (08-07-2018)

Why the endangered green sea turtle is losing its male population

turtles saf
Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

The struggle to save the already endangered green sea turtle faces a new challenge. Now, the males of the species seem to be disappearing.

It’s not genetics that determine a sea turtle’s sex, it’s the temperature of the sand. The tipping point is roughly 85 degrees for a species that’s predominantly female…

Read Full Article, CBS News (08-07-2018)

Rising temperatures turning major sea turtle population female; Science Daily (01-11-2018)
Scientists have used a new research approach to show that warming temperatures are turning one of the world’s largest sea turtle colonies almost entirely female, running the risk that the colony cannot sustain itself in coming decades, newly published research concludes…

For Marine Life, New Threats from a Fast-Tracked Canadian Pipeline


Photo source: ©© Vijay Somalinga

Excerpts;

A new Canadian government-backed pipeline that will triple the amount of thick Alberta tar sands oil flowing to a British Columbia port poses significant risks for a threatened population of killer whales and other coastal marine life…

Read Full Article, Yale E360 (08-02-2018)

A mourning orca mother carried her dead baby for days through the ocean, CNN (07-27-2018)
A grieving mother orca near Vancouver Island has been carrying her dead calf for four days, after refusing to leave her baby behind when the rest of her pod left. The sad display speaks to something deeper. Killer whales eat salmon, and a number of human practices, such as damming rivers, have taken a toll on native salmon populations…

Troubled Waters

fishes-fausse-peche
“Fausse-pêche.” Discarded fishes from unwanted catch, on Atlantic shores. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care.
The EU has banned discarding caught fish in February 2013. The ban has been phased in gradually, beginning with the North Sea in 2014. By 2019 it will cover all the EU’s fisheries, with some exceptions. Regulatory tools such a seasonal or area closures can help but, alas, cannot completely eliminate the discard problem. Once a fish is caught, it is almost certainly going to die either because it is out of the water or because it was injured in the process… Captions: OECD Observer

Excerpts;

UCSB scientists find that wealthy nations are responsible for almost all of trackable industrial fishing across the global oceans.

Furthermore, vessels registered to wealthy countries were found to be responsible for 78 percent of trackable industrial fishing in the domestic waters of less-wealthy countries, a practice employed when the wealthy countries’ demand for fish exceeds its domestic supply or these wealthy nations otherwise wish to seek out new supplies of fish.

China, Taiwan and Japan top the list of a very small number of wealthy countries whose industrial fishing dominates the high seas, with China and Taiwan together responsible for a little more than half of all the trackable industrial fishing in the shared waters. Meanwhile, China, Taiwan and South Korea were also found to be the top three industrial fishing countries fishing in the domestic waters of less-wealthy nations; their vessels were detected in 45 percent of all non-landlocked nations’ waters…

Read Full Article, UCSB Current (08-01-2018)

Original Study: “Wealthy countries dominate industrial fishing”; Science Mag (08-01-2018)

Large-scale commercial fishing covers more than half of the oceans, study finds; CBS News (02-23-2018)

Official fish trade ‘hugely underestimates’ global catches; Science Daily (10-09-2017)
Conservation of dwindling fish stocks is being severely hampered by poor controls on global trade, according to new research…

Overfishing is as big a threat to humanity as it is to our oceans; Guardian UK (02-16-2016)

As global per-capita fish consumption hits all-time high, UN warns on over harvesting; UN (07-07-2016)
A new report from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) shows that while growth in aquaculture has helped drive global per capita fish consumption above 20 kilograms a year for the first time, almost a third of commercial fish stocks are now overharvested at biologically unsustainable levels…

Chinese Foreign Fisheries Catch 12 Times More Than Reported, Study Shows; Science Daily (04-03-2013)

Nearly Half of U.S. Seafood Supply is Wasted, Study Shows, Science Daily (09-25-2015)
As much as 47 percent of the edible US seafood supply is lost each year, mainly from consumer waste, new research suggests…

Food Chain Collapse Predicted in World’s Oceans; Discovery News (10-12-2015)

The World’s Tuna and Mackerel Populations Are in a “Catastrophic” Decline, Quartz (09-17-2015)

EU proposes total commercial fishing ban on Atlantic sea bass; Guardian UK (10-27-2016)

African Fisheries Plundered by Foreign Fleets; IPS News (07-02-2016)