Tag Archives: Sandy Super storm

Survivors’ tales part of the art in Superstorm Sandy exhibit

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Photo source: ©© Hunter Desportes

Excerpts;

The stories of people who survived Superstorm Sandy, scrawled in their own handwriting, are an integral part of a new art exhibit remembering the deadly storm and the devastation it caused seven years ago. The “Just Beachy After Sandy” exhibit at Monmouth University in New Jersey is on display through early December…

Read Full Article; ABC News (10-27-2019)

Sandy Reminds Us of Coastal Hazards, by Robert Young

As the climate warms, we are ‘primed’ for worse storms than Sandy; Science Daily (10-06-2016)
With the climate warming and the sea level rising, conditions are ripe for storms deadlier and more devastating than Sandy that put more people at risk. If damaging storms become more frequent, retreat from areas with mounting repetitive losses will become a topic of discussion…

A Year After Sandy, The Wrong Policy on Rebuilding the Coast, by Robert Young Yale 360 E (10-31-2013)

Detailed Flood Information Key to More Reliable Coastal Storm Impact Estimates

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Ortley Beach and Lavallette, NJ. Aerial pictures of New Jersey’s coast, after superstorm Sandy devastated the area. Photo courtesy of: © Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines (PSDS) / WCU

By USGS;

A new study that looked in part at how damage estimates evolve following a storm puts the total amount of building damage caused by Hurricane Sandy for all evaluated counties in New York at $23 billion. Estimates of damage by county ranged from $380 million to $5.9 billion.

The U.S. Geological Survey study, done in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, marks the first time the agency has done this type of analysis and cost estimation for a coastal storm.

“We looked at how estimates of building damage change depending on the amount of information available at the time of the estimate, looking at three time periods — storm landfall, two weeks later, and then three months later,” said Chris Schubert, a USGS hydrologist and lead author of the study. “What we found was that the biggest jump in estimate reliability comes between the initial estimate and the two-week mark, but that the additional information available three months after an event greatly help refine the estimates even further.”

The USGS researcher called the study a “proof of concept” that really showcased the value of gathering storm data before and after a storm.

“FEMA funded the sensor placement we did prior to the storm and our assessment of how high the water reached after the storm,” Schubert said. “The results from this new study demonstrated how the additional resolution and accuracy of flood depictions resulting from these efforts greatly improved the damage estimates.”

Damage estimates can be used by FEMA and other stakeholders to help prioritize relief and reconstruction efforts following a storm. The results can also assist with resiliency planning that helps communities prepare for future storms.

The researchers came up with the estimates by using census data and FEMA’s HAZUS modeling software program. The HAZUS program is used to estimate potential loss from disasters such as earthquakes, wind, hurricanes and floods. This program allows for an assessment of building loss on a block-by-block level.

Hurricane Sandy’s impact was the first time in recent memory, and record, that coastal water levels had reached the heights they attained in many places in the state of New York. Flood effects of Hurricane Sandy, in comparison to those from Tropical Storm Irene in 2011, were significantly more extensive, with most water levels rising at least 2.5 feet higher than in the 2011 storm.

With the latest USGS analysis, a comprehensive picture of the magnitude of Sandy’s impact is now available. Without the sensor placement before the storm, and assessment of high-water marks after, this level of understanding wouldn’t be possible.

“This is the first time USGS has done this type of analysis and cost estimation for a coastal storm,” said Schubert. “The effort incorporates what we learned from previous storms going back to Katrina, and the storm-tide information we provided to FEMA in the immediate aftermath of Sandy is one of the building blocks for this research. The additional fidelity of the damage estimate underscores the tremendous value of the dataset for this storm.”

Interpretation of storm-tide data from a variety of tools such as tide gauges, stream gauges, and temporary sensors combined with high-water marks showed the extreme nature of storm-tide flooding and, at some sites, the severity and arrival time of the storm surge. Storm surge is the height of water above the normal astronomical tide level due to a storm. Storm tide is the storm surge in addition to the regular tide.

“Timing matters, though every storm is different,” said Schubert. “Throughout southeastern New York, we saw that timing of the surge arrival determined how high the storm tide reached. The worst flooding impacts occurred along the Atlantic Ocean-facing parts of New York City and western Long Island, where the peak storm surge arrived at high tide. So the resulting storm tide was five to six feet higher than it would have been had the peak surge arrived at low tide.”

The new research is available online in, Analysis of Storm-Tide Impacts from Hurricane Sandy in New York, SIR 2015-5036, by C.E. Schubert, R. Busciolano, P.P. Hearn Jr., A.N. Rahav, R. Behrens, J. Finkelstein, J. Monti Jr., and A. E. Simonson. It examined damage estimates from those counties with depictions of flood extent available from FEMA and the National Hurricane Center.

The USGS is also conducting a study in New Jersey that examines similar topics, including the estimated flood frequency of documented peak storm-tide elevations, comparisons of Sandy to historic coastal storms, the timing of storm surge, and changes in HAZUS damage estimates with the use of USGS sensor and high-water-mark data. That study is expected to be completed and released later this year.

Original Article, USGS

Sandy Reminds Us of Coastal Hazards, by Pr. Robert Young

Hurricane Sandy Relief Bill Fails to Face Coastal Realities, by Robert S. Young,

Rebuilding the Shores, Increasing the Risks, The New York Times (04-2013)

“Why Americans Are Flocking To Their Sinking Shores Even As The Risks Mount – PART II: Against The tide,” From the: “Water’s Edge: the Crisis Of Rising Sea Levels – PART II,” A Report By Reuters

After Hurricane Sandy, One Man Tries To Stop The Reconstruction, Outside Magazine

Sea-Level Rise Poses Hard Choice for Two Neighborhoods: Rebuild or Retreat?

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Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

New York’s status as a global hub of finance, media, and culture—as well as its strong mayoral support for climate action—means that both moves are happening under a microscope. Coastal cities nationally and worldwide hope to learn by watching to see whether one of world’s most populated, creative, and complex cities can recover from one climate disaster while simultaneously preparing for the next.

But now even the waterfront is becoming a tale of two cities: one where it’s become too dangerous to remain, and another deemed impossible—or perhaps too valuable—to abandon…

Read Full Article, Take Part

After Hurricane Sandy, One Man Tries To Stop The Reconstruction, Outside Magazine (10-09-2013)

Sandy Reminds Us of Coastal Hazards, by Robert Young

A Year After Sandy, The Wrong Policy on Rebuilding the Coast, Yale E360 (04-09-2013)

Rebuilding the Shores, Increasing the Risks, The New York Times (04-09-2013)

Stormproofing The City: Where Have the Billion Allocated for Sandy Relief Been Spent?, Guardian UK (12-09-2014)

Two Years After Hurricane Sandy : Fortifying New York – How Well Armored Are We For The Next Superstorm? International Business Time (10-29-2014)
New York City officials expect sea levels to rise by more than 2.5 feet over the next four decades, an increase that — if not properly addressed now — could put 800,000 people’s homes underwater in the event of another storm…

A Tale of Two Cities: Miami, New York and Life on the Edge, Climate Central (08-22-2014)
Walking along the waterfront in Fort Lauderdale and admiring the 60-foot yachts docked alongside impressive homes, it’s hard to imagine that this city could suffer the same financial fate as Detroit…

U.S. Cities Lag in Race against Rising Seas, Scientific American (01-20-2015)

Walls Around our Coastal Cities? By Gary Griggs

High, Wide Sand Dunes Worked During Hurricane Sandy, Report Finds

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Coastal restoration, New-York. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

A study by a leading coastal science center lends new support to New Jersey’s efforts to build protective sand dunes along its 127-mile coast.

The Coastal Research Center at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey studied the state’s beaches just before and after Superstorm Sandy in October 2012. It found beaches with higher, wider dunes protected better against the storm than beaches without them…

Read Full Article, AP / Huffington Green

Stormproofing The City: Where Have the Billion Allocated for Sandy Relief Been Spent?

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Ortley Beach and Lavallette, NJ. Aerial pictures of New Jersey’s coast, after superstorm Sandy devastated the area. Photo courtesy of: © Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines (PSDS) / WCU

Excerpts;

After hurricane Sandy hit, Congress granted federal agencies a total of $48b for disaster recovery. Two years later, much of it still hasn’t been spent…

Read Full Article, Guardian UK

Hurricane Sandy Relief Bill Fails to Face Coastal Realities, by Robert S. Young,

Rebuilding the Shores, Increasing the Risks, The New York Times

Shoring Up the Nation’s Crumbling Coastlines

Sandy Reminds Us of Coastal Hazards, by Pr. Robert Young

“Why Americans Are Flocking To Their Sinking Shores Even As The Risks Mount – PART II: Against The tide,” From the: “Water’s Edge: the Crisis Of Rising Sea Levels – PART II,” A Report By Reuters

Reuters’ Water’s Edge Report – PART I: Insidious Invasion: “As The Seas Rise, A Slow-Motion Disaster Gnaws At America’s Shores” By Reuters(09-05-2014)
A Reuters analysis finds that flooding is increasing along much of the nation’s coastline, forcing many communities into costly, controversial struggles with a relentless foe.

After Hurricane Sandy, One Man Tries To Stop The Reconstruction, Outside Magazine

Two Years After Hurricane Sandy : Fortifying New York – How Well Armored Are We For The Next Superstorm?

nyc-subway-flood
Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

New York City officials expect sea levels to rise by more than 2.5 feet over the next four decades, an increase that — if not properly addressed now — could put 800,000 people’s homes underwater in the event of another storm.

“Whenever you protect something with fixed-height sea walls, levees, dams and so on, then you create false sense of safety,” Jacob said, pointing to New Orleans’ method of surrounding itself with walls and dams that were overtaken by Hurricane Katrina’s floodwaters in 2005…

Read Full Article, International Business Time

Could This ‘Big U’ Save NYC From Another Superstorm ? Huffington Green (06-03-2014)

Sandy Reminds Us of Coastal Hazards, by Robert S. Young, PhD, PG, Director of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines

Two Years On: Sandy Storm Inspires More Climate Research

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Mantoloking, NJ. Aerial pictures of New Jersey’s coast, after superstorm Sandy devastated the area. Photo courtesy of: © Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines (PSDS) / WCU

Excerpts;

This Wednesday marks the second anniversary of Hurricane Sandy, shocking photos showed the huge extent of the destruction caused by the storm, revealing widespread damage to coastal areas of New York and New Jersey.

Sandy has spurred an unprecedented amount of research, attempting to tackle the questions about what role climate change might have played in producing or worsening the storm, how global warming might influence similar storms in the future, and why the storm caused so much damage — $19 billion in the New York City area alone…

Read Full Article, Climate Central

New York, New Jersey look back 2 years after Sandy, Wral
The second anniversary of Superstorm Sandy arrived Wednesday in a region where recovery in New Jersey and New York is happening unevenly, with many houses, boardwalks and businesses rebuilt, but many other people still unable to return to their homes…

These Images Show Just How Much Some Neighborhoods Were Changed By Hurricane Sandy, Huffington Green

Sandy Reminds Us of Coastal Hazards, by Robert Young

Shoring Up the Nation’s Crumbling Coastlines
Hurricane Sandy pummeled the beaches of the Northeast, stripping away sand and dunes, and ploughing through seawalls. Can beaches be rebuilt to face fiercer storms and rising seas? And is there even enough sand to do it? Ira Flatow and guests discuss engineering the nation’s coasts for “the new normal.”

After Hurricane Sandy, One Man Tries To Stop The Reconstruction, Outside Magazine (10-09-2013)

Rebuilding the Shores, Increasing the Risks, The New York Times (04-09-2013)

A Year After Sandy, The Wrong Policy on Rebuilding the Coast, Yale E360 (04-09-2013)

5 Things Hurricane Sandy Changed for Good, LiveScience (10-29-2013)

Hurricane Sandy ‘s Silver Lining, A National Geographic Video

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Fire island, NY. Aerial pictures of Fire island, after superstorm Sandy devastated the area. Photograph courtesy of: © Rob Young and Andy Coburn, Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines / Western Carolina University

A breach torn through New York’s Fire Island by Hurricane Sandy is bringing new life in to a long-polluted ecosystem.

Two years ago, Hurricane Sandy ripped three holes through the barrier islands off Long Island’s southern coast. The Army Corps of Engineers quickly filled two. Though some flood-fearfull homeowners demanded that the third inlet be immediately closed, others noticed something miraculous occurring…

WATCH: A National Geographic Video: “Does Hurricane Sandy Have a Silver Lining” (October 2013)

Open Letter From The Community Of Coastal Scientists Regarding The Benefits Of Inlets Opened During Coastal Storms, By Robert S. Young, Phd, PG (03-21-2013)

Hurricane Irene Opens New Inlets on Hatteras Island, By Rob Young and Andy Coburn / Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, (08-29-2011)