Tag Archives: Tropical Cyclones

Patricia, Strongest Landfalling Pacific Hurricane on Record, Downgraded to Tropical Depression

patricia-ocean-wind
Wind speed and direction near the ocean surface, as measured on October 23 by the International Space Station-Rapid Scatterometer (ISS-RapidScat). Brighter shades of blue represent stronger surface winds. Meteorologists were impressed by the rate at which Patricia intensified, growing from a tropical storm to a category 5 hurricane in just 24 hours. Captions and Image source: NASA / Earth Obserbatory

Excerpts;

The eye of Hurricane Patricia made landfall Friday at 6:15 p.m. CDT near Cuixmala in Jalisco state of southwest Mexico, hammering coastal areas but causing less damage than had been feared.

Patricia is among the most rapidly intensifying tropical cyclones ever witnessed anywhere in the world since the advent of modern meteorology. Patricia weakened even faster than it strengthened…

Read Full Article, Weather Channel

Patricia roars into Mexico; still can’t let guard down, president says, CNN

Hurricane Patricia: Flood Threat for Millions But Winds Weaken to Depression, NBC News

Why Did Hurricane Patricia Become a Monster So Quickly?

Patricia-mexico
Oct. 23, 2015 – Record-Breaking Hurricane Patricia. The strongest hurricane ever recorded in the Western Hemisphere, barreled closer and closer to Mexico’s Pacific coast. An extremely dangerous storm surge is expected to produce significant coastal flooding. Image source: NASA

Excerpts;

Hurricane Patricia zoomed from tropical storm to record-beater in 30 hours flat like a jet-fueled sports car. Why? The Pacific storm had just the right ingredients…

Read Full Article, AP / Yahoo News

Oct. 23, 2015 – Update #3 – NASA Analyzes Record-Breaking Hurricane Patricia, NASA

Patricia, Strongest Hurricane Ever Recorded, Menaces Mexico, CNN (10-23-2015)
Patricia — the strongest hurricane ever recorded in the Western Hemisphere — barreled closer and closer Friday morning to Mexico’s Pacific coast. An extremely dangerous storm surge is expected to produce significant coastal flooding…

Patricia, Strongest Hurricane Ever Recorded, Menaces Mexico

patricia-hurricane
Potentially catastrophic hurricane Patricia moving northward toward ladfall in Southwestern Mexico. Captions and Image source: NHC NOAA

Excerpts;

Patricia — the strongest hurricane ever recorded in the Western Hemisphere — barreled closer and closer Friday morning to Mexico’s Pacific coast…

An extremely dangerous storm surge is expected to produce significant coastal flooding near and to the right of where the center makes landfall. Near the coast, the surge will be accompanied by large and destructive waves.

Read Full Article, CNN

NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP Satellite Sees Record-Breaking Hurricane Patricia

Hurricane PATRICIA Public Advisory, NHC NOAA
Maximum sustained winds remain near 200 mph (325 km/h) with higher gusts. Patricia is a category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Some fluctuations in intensity are possible today, but Patricia is expected to remain an extremely dangerous category 5 hurricane through landfall.
An extremely dangerous storm surge is expected to produce significant coastal flooding near and to the right of where the center makes landfall. Near the coast, the surge will be accompanied by large and destructive waves…

Mexico braces for strongest hurricane in Western hemisphere, AP

Why the Philippines is Being Battered By Yet Another Fearsome Typhoon

cyclone-koppu
Typhoon Koppu over the Philippines, October 19th, 2015. Although Koppu had weakened, the threat of flooding lingered. According to Weather Underground blogger Bob Henson, models agreed that the storm would spend another three to four days creeping northward along Luzon—the largest, northernmost island in the Philippines. . Captions and Photo source: NASA / Earth Observatory

Excerpts;

The Philippines sits in what scientists call the “warm pool” in the Western Pacific, with nothing between the country and open water…

Read Full Article, National Geographic

Philippines Braced as Typhoon Koppu (Lando) Makes Landfall

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Tacloban city was the worst hit by Super Typhoon Haiyan, which devastated the central Philippines on November 8, 2013. Captions And Photo source: ©© International Labour

Excerpts;

Authorities in the Philippines have cancelled flights and ordered thousands of people in coastal areas to evacuate as Typhoon Koppu, known as Lando in the Philippines, hits the country.

The slow-moving storm made landfall near the town of Casiguran on the main island of Luzon on Sunday morning…

Read Full Article, BBC News

Super Typhoon Koppu makes landfall over northern Philippines, CNN

NASA’s GPM Sees Koppu Menacing The Philippines

Joaquin Strengthens to Category 4, Batters Bahamas


WATCH: a NASA Video uploaded on Youtube, October 1st, 2015.This animation of images captured from September 29 to October 1 from NOAA’s GOES-East satellite shows Hurricane Joaquin become a major hurricane in the Bahamas Satellite Movie Shows Hurricane Joaquin in the Bahamas, NASA.

Excerpts;

Hurricane Joaquin strengthened into a Category 4 storm on Thursday as it roared through lightly populated islands of the eastern Bahamas, and forecasters said it could grow still more intense before following a path that would near the U.S. East Coast…

Read Full Article, AP

Satellites Show Joaquin Become a Category 4 Hurricane, NASA

Super-typhoon Dujuan Slams Northern Taiwan

Typhoon-Dujuan
Super Typhoon Dujuan approaching Taiwan, on September 28. The storm’s center made landfall along Taiwan’s mountainous northeast coast near the town of Nan’ao. The storm came ashore with sustained winds of 225 kilometers (140 miles) per hour—the equivalent of a category 4 hurricane. Captions and Photo source: NASA / Earth Observatory

Excerpts;

Super Typhoon Dujuan, made landfall along Taiwan’s mountainous northeast coast near the town of Nan’ao. The storm came ashore with sustained winds of 225 kilometers (140 miles) per hour—the equivalent of a category 4 hurricane.

Super typhoon Dujuan kills two people and leaves more than 300 injured in Taiwan, authorities say after it swept across the island before making landfall in eastern China. The storm also hit the Chinese coastal city of Putian on Tuesday morning, but no reports of damage followed…

View News Video, ScienceDaily / AFP

Super Typhoon Dujuan Slams Northern Taiwan, NASA / Earth Observatory

‘Gray Swan’ Hurricanes Could Strike Unexpected Places

nyc hurricane
A wave from the 1938 hurricane strikes a seawall in New England. Photo source: NOAA

Excerpts;

“Gray swan” hurricanes — storms with impacts more extreme than history alone would predict — could ravage cities in Florida, Australia and the Persian Gulf, researchers say.

The risk of these extreme surges will likely grow in the coming century, as climate change is expected to increase both the number and intensity of storms, and dramatically increase the chance of damage from these unexpected storms…

Read Full Article, LiveScience

NASA Sees a Tropical Trio of Category 4 Pacific Ocean Hurricanes

3-hurricanes-pacific-2015
Trio of Category 4 hurricanes in the Pacific on Saturday night: Kilo, Ignacio, and Jimena. This is the first recorded occurrence of three Category 4 hurricanes in the central and eastern Pacific basins at the same time. In addition, it’s also the first time with three major hurricanes (Category 3 or stronger) in those basins simultaneously. (Image/NASA).

By Rob Gutro, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center;

NASA’s Terra satellite saw Hurricanes Kilo, Ignacio, and Jimena, all Category Four Hurricanes, lined up across the Central and Eastern Pacific Ocean on August 29 at 22:25 UTC (6:25 p.m. EDT). This is the first time there have been three active hurricanes in the Eastern or Central Pacific Ocean this season, and they’re all major hurricanes.

The Central Pacific Hurricane Center in Honolulu Hawaii is issuing advisories on all of the hurricanes. On Sunday, August 30, from west to east, Hurricane Kilo was located 1,210 miles west-southwest of Honolulu, Hawaii, Hurricane Ignacio was located 515 miles east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii, and Hurricane Jimena was located 1,815 miles east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii.

Hurricane Kilo: Category Four Hurricane

At 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC) on August 30, the center of hurricane kilo was located near latitude 18.6 north and longitude 176.8 west. Kilo was moving toward the west-northwest near 9 mph (15 kph). Kilo is expected to curve toward the northwest…then west northwest over the next two days.

Maximum sustained winds are near 140 mph (220 kph) with higher gusts. Kilo is a category four hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane wind scale. Little change is expected for the next 12 hours…then slight weakening through 48 hours. The estimated minimum central pressure is 940 millibars.

Kilo is expected to continue remaining a major hurricane through Thursday, September 3 is it moves to the north-northwest while remaining away from and to the west-southwest of Midway Island, Kure Atoll, Pearl and Hermes Atoll. For updated forecasts and local effects to Hawaii, visit the CPHC website: NOAA

Hurricane Ignacio: Category Four Hurricane

On August 30, a tropical storm watch was in effect for Maui county…including the islands of Maui…Molokai…Lanai and Kahoolawe, in addition to Hawaii County.

Like Kilo, Ignacio is a category four hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane wind scale. Maximum sustained winds are near 140 mph (220 kph). The CPHC expects Ignacio to weaken through Tuesday, September 2.

At 8 a.m. EDT (2 a.m. HST/1200 UTC) the center of Hurricane Ignacio was located near latitude 17.9 north and longitude 148.2 west. Ignacio is moving toward the northwest near 8 mph (13 kph) and this motion Is expected to continue for the next couple of days. On the forecast track…the center of Ignacio is expected to pass to the northeast of the big island on Monday, then northeast of the smaller islands Tuesday. The estimated minimum central pressure is 948 millibars: For the National Weather Service local statement on Ignacio on August 30:

For updated forecasts and local effects to Hawaii, visit the CPHC website: http://www.prh.noaa.gov/cphc.

Hurricane Jimena: Category Four Hurricane

At 5 a.m. EDT (O900 UTC), the eye of Hurricane Jimena was located near latitude 13.7 North, longitude 128.4 West. That’s about 1,365 miles (2,200 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico.

Like Kilo and Ignacio, Jimena is a category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 130 mph (215 kph) with higher gusts. Fluctuations in intensity are possible during the next day or so, but Jimena is expected to remain a major hurricane through Monday, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Jimena’s estimated minimum central pressure is 947 millibars. Jimena is moving toward the west-northwest near 13 mph (20 kph) and this general motion is expected to continue for the next couple of days. For updated forecasts, visit the National Hurricane Center.

Original Article, NASA