Category Archives: Beach Art

Me and you three; 2 Years, 4 Artists, 8 Beaches: Part Two

Annik Cullinane, Judes Crow, Mary Flynn, Gerry Price.
An exhibition by four island of Wight artists, at Michael West Gallery. Students showed their responses in the form of their own artwork.

For two years, four artists have been making site visits together to coastal locations and visits to eight island beaches, around the Isle of Wight, UK. The result is an eclectic exhibition made cohesive by linking the marine environment to humanity. The work communicates experiences of loss and bereavement, conflict between the undeniable beauty of the coast and evidence of decay, thoughts about permanence and transience, and the rythm and inevitability of change.

Artists Annik Cullinane, Judes Crow, Mary Flynn and Gerry Price created opportunities for young people to engage with the ideas and process that inform the exhibition Me and You three; 2 years, 4 artists, 8 beaches in the Michael West Gallery.

Groups of young people from three local Isle of Wight’s schools visited the exhibition.

These students showed their responses in the form of their own artwork. This took place in the Learning Curve Gallery at Quay Arts Centre 12th June – 24th July 2010.

Over the summer a changing collection of work has unfolded creating a developping exhibition by students from Clatterford Tuition Center, Cowes High School and St George’s Community School.

Clatterford students are 12 to 15 years old, who find attending school difficult for various reasons. They are taught in a centre which aims to get them back into mainstream schools.

St George’s Special School students have varying learning and physical differences and were age 12 to 13.

Cowes High School students’ age 17, are studying for an exam in art.

Each Grain of Sand a Tiny Work of Art

Sand Microscopic
Microscopic images of Sand.

A Grain of Sand, Gary Greenberg: in Discover Magazine

Excerpt from Lizzie Buchen, Discover Magazine

When you take a moonlit stroll on the beach, how often do you think about the tiny grains of sand creeping in between your toes?

From above, sand seems like a bunch of tiny brown rocks, perhaps peppered with occasional shells. But sand has a far more fascinating story to tell.

Composed of the remnants of volcanic explosions, eroded mountains, dead organisms, and even degraded man-made structures, sand can reveal the history, both biological and geologic, of a local environment.

And examined closely enough, as the scientist and artist Gary Greenberg has, sand can reveal spectacular colors, shapes, and textures.

These images of sand from around the world were taken by Greenberg using an Edge 3D Microscope and can be found in his book, A Grain of Sand.

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Me and you three; 2 years, 4 artists, 8 beaches

Me and You Three; 2 Years, 4 Artists, 8 Beaches

The exhibition showcases works by four island of Wight artists: Judes Crow, Annik Cullinane, Mary Flynn & Gerry Price, presented at the Michael West Gallery at Quay Arts from June 5th to26th 2010.

For two years, four artists have been making site visits together to coastal locations and visits to eight island beaches, around the Isle of Wight, UK. The result is an eclectic exhibition made cohesive by linking the marine environment to humanity. The work communicates experiences of loss and bereavement, conflict between the undeniable beauty of the coast and evidence of decay, thoughts about permanence and transience, and the rythm and inevitability of change.

15 metres of plastic debris, large sea banners stitched from materials reclaimed from the sea and installations entitled ‘The Last Supper’ and ‘This is Not a Toy’ refer to a world drowning in plastic. Plaques commemorating bodies washed ashore and paintings of human embryos comment on the unpredictability of life. Clay re-claimed from the cliffs and sketches done on location evidence the continually changing nature of the coastal environment.

Groups of young people from three local schools will visit the exhibition. These students will show their responses in the form of their own artwork. This will take place in the ‘Learning Curve Gallery’ at Quay Arts Centre 12th June – 24th July.

Artists statements:

Judes Crow

“The sea is the container of the unknown and the mysterious. It is an appropriate synonym for the unconscious” C.G. Jung 1944

Through my art practice I aim to achieve both conscious and unconscious expression of an internal mythology developed from intense life experiences and a profound connection with the natural cycles of birth and death. Within my paintings visual narratives emerge, joining together subjective feelings and transforming objective reality.
I use the richness of the coastal environment and the wealth of material it provides to explore internal states and childhood memories.

Annik Cullinane
Since moving to the Island twenty years ago I have been involved in
drawing the landscape. Settling in Ventnor, my focus became the rugged
coastline, particularly the eroding cliffs of the wild dramatic
beaches such as St Lawrence, Luccombe, Shanklin and Bonchurch.

Mary Flynn
I find myself continually drawn to the beach, witnessing the ebb and flow of the tides. The rhythm of change and the excitement of shoreline finds interest me. I am compelled to explore and record the objects I find, creating a new order from found objects, or attaching a personal significance to them. I have become concerned with the impact of man on the environment. The materials I use vary: they include found objects, fabric, stitch, and print. Exploration and experiment are key issues in my work.

Gerry Price
The focus of my visual arts practice has changed and developed over the years. I have used a wide range of materials and processes to produce objects and images. Recent work has been made in response to experiences of loss and bereavement. The work has strong conceptual and physical links to the coastal environment in which I live and work. Physically this often means using materials found on the shore. Conceptually the impact of the environment is more complicated. The sea and tidal action become metaphors for change, transformation and loss. I am currently preoccupied with thoughts about permanence and transience.

For information contact:

Judes Crow