Category Archives: Sandy Storm

NASA Wallops Recovery Continues From Hurricane Sandy

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Aerial photographs of the NASA Wallops facility and coastline. On the left is from August 2012 after completion of a Shoreline Protection Project. On the right is from November 2012 after Hurricane Sandy swept by. Captions and Image source: NASA

By Rob Gutro,NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Hurricane Sandy came ashore in northern New Jersey Oct. 29, 2012, and as the powerful storm made its way along the East Coast it brought damage to NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Va. The Wallops Shoreline Protection Project has been managing the restoration efforts and released before and after photos of the shoreline.

At 8 a.m. EDT on Oct. 29, 2012, the National Hurricane Center reported tropical-storm-force winds were occurring along the coasts of southern New Jersey, Delaware and eastern Virginia. Tropical-storm-force winds extended as far inland as the central and southern Chesapeake Bay as Hurricane Sandy closed in for landfall.

Hurricane Sandy removed about 700 feet of protective berm and about 20 percent of the beach protecting Wallops Island, home to NASA Wallops’ launch pads and launch support facilities.

The beach, which had been recently improved under the Wallops Island Shoreline Protection Project is vital to protecting the more than $1 billion in NASA and governmental assets on Wallops Island from hazards such as hurricanes and nor’easters.

In addition to beach erosion, Hurricane Sandy caused minor roof, door and siding damage and downed trees throughout the facility.

NASA Wallops released three images showing the shoreline in 2011, in August 2012 following the completion of the Shoreline Protection Project, and in November 2012, showing the extent of the damages from the storm. The November 2012 photograph clearly shows extensive beach erosion. Wallops is now working to conduct an out-of-cycle beach replenishment and to repair the protective berm…

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) was established in 1945 by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics as a center for aeronautics research, and is now NASA’s principal facility for managing and implementing suborbital research programs.

WFF is located in the northeastern portion of Accomack County, Va., on the Delmarva Peninsula, and is comprised of three land masses: the Main Base, Wallops Mainland and Wallops Island. Wallops Island consists of approximately 1,680 hectares (4,600 acres), is bounded by Chincoteague Inlet to the north, Assawoman Island to the south, the Atlantic Ocean to the east and estuaries to the west.

Original Article, NASA

We Need to Retreat From the Beach, by Orrin H. Pilkey
As ocean waters warm, the Northeast is likely to face more Sandy-like storms. And as sea levels continue to rise, the surges of these future storms will be higher and even more deadly. We can’t stop these powerful storms. But we can reduce the deaths and damage they cause…

More Storms Like Sandy? Arctic Ice Loss Amplified Superstorm Sandy Violence

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Mantoloking, NJ. Aerial pictures of New Jersey’s coast, after superstorm Sandy devastated the area. Photo courtesy of: © Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines (PSDS) / WCU

Excerpts;

If you believe that last October’s Superstorm Sandy was a freak of nature, the confluence of unusual meteorological, atmospheric and celestial events, think again…

Read Full Article, Science Daily

Sandy Reminds Us of Coastal Hazards, by Robert Young

South Street Seaport, Lower Manhattan: A ‘Ghost Town’ Months After Hurricane Sandy

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New York City. Photo source: ©© Zoriah

Excerpts;

The historic cobblestone streets and 19th-century mercantile buildings near the water’s edge in lower Manhattan are eerily deserted, a neighborhood silenced by Superstorm Sandy…

Read Full Article, Huffington Post

A Study: “A coupled physical and economic model of the response of coastal real estate to climate risk,” Nature Climate Change

Hurricane Sandy Was Second-Costliest In U.S. History, Report Shows

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Hurricane Sandy aftermath – NC12. Photo source: ©© NCDOTcommunications

Excerpts;

Superstorm Sandy was the deadliest hurricane to hit the northeastern U.S. in 40 years and the second-costliest in the nation’s history…

Read Full Article, Huffington Post / AP

We Need to Retreat From the Beach, By Orrin Pilkey
As ocean waters warm, the Northeast is likely to face more Sandy-like storms. And as sea levels continue to rise, the surges of these future storms will be higher and even more deadly. We can’t stop these powerful storms. But we can reduce the deaths and damage they cause…

Hurricane Sandy Relief Bill Fails to Face Coastal Realities, By Rob Young
As part of the sorely-needed aid package to help victims of Hurricane Sandy, Congress is also considering spending billions on ill-advised and environmentally damaging beach and coastal rebuilding projects that ignore the looming threats of rising seas and intensifying storms.

Shoring Up the Nation’s Crumbling Coastlines, Science Friday

Retooling New York for Apocalyptic Storms

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Sandy storm aftermath. Photo source: ©© Giladlotan

Excerpts;

During World War II, a German U-boat made its way into New York Harbour. It fired two torpedoes at a British tanker, splitting the hull in three places and igniting it in flames. The captain and 35 members of his crew burned to death.

Seventy years later, New York Harbour is Lower Manhattan’s first line of defence against another threat: the rising tides of the sea…

Orff, who is also the founding principal of SCAPE – a landscape architecture and urban design office, slated to present at a Feb. 9 conference entitled “Waterproofing New York City”, recalled her own experience during Hurricane Sandy: “I don’t think there’s anything like seeing water lapping at your feet on West End Avenue that provides a wakeup call. I can’t imagine what else could be more dramatic and focusing than water overtaking one of America’s celebrated international cities…”

Read Full Article, IPS

Natural hazards: New York vs the sea, Nature Journal

Congress passes $50.5B Superstorm Sandy aid bill

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Mantoloking, NJ. Aerial pictures of New Jersey’s coast, after superstorm Sandy devastated the area. Photo courtesy of: © Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines (PSDS) / WCU

Excerpts;

Three months after Superstorm Sandy ravaged coastal areas in much of the Northeast, Congress on Monday sent a $50.5 billion emergency relief measure for storm victims to President Barack Obama for his signature…

Read Full Article, AP

Experts Urge Caution As $50 Billion In Sandy Aid Passes House
The House of Representatives passed a bill this week to spend $50 billion to help states struck by Hurricane Sandy. Several billion dollars are pegged for projects to reduce risk of future storms, and this alarmes some scientists who studied what happens to structures built along coastlines…

On battered Jersey shore, Sandy victims struggle with costs of climate change, CSM

The Memory of Risks / Xynthia Superstorm- France
It is 4:00 am. Howling winds, whipping rains, infuriated seas, and eight meter high (26 feet) crashing waves, are muffling the desperate cries for help…4:00 am… Twenty nine human lives are being swept away, drowned in the March frigid and salty ocean waters. They were in their sleep, in their beds, in the comfort of their home…they did not understand, they could not react, most of them too old, too frail, or much too little to run for safety and climb on the rooftops, like most of the survivors did. That very night, hundreds of survivors were trapped for hours, trembling with fear and piercing cold, in agony, and battered by rain and incomprehension. Only lit by the full moon, in the darkest night of their life, all were waiting for the emergency crews and help to arrive.
These are horrifying facts, eventually, yet tragically surpassed by an intolerable truth, when, in 2010, Superstorm Xynthia swept through France with powerful winds of 160km/h 90 miles. The potentiality of such a disaster was well foreseen, and highly expected to occur. And it did, in France, one of the most developed and industrialized countries in the world, in the southwestern coastal towns of La Faute-sur-Mer and neighboring l’Aiguillon-sur-Mer..

Shoring Up the Nation’s Crumbling Coastlines

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NC coast. Crews digging a trench to connect sandbgs in Uncle Jimmys Landing, North Carolina, US, using an HTC6435LVW. Photo source: ©© NCDOTcommunications

Excerpts;

Hurricane Sandy pummeled the beaches of the Northeast, stripping away sand and dunes, and ploughing through seawalls. Can beaches be rebuilt to face fiercer storms and rising seas? And is there even enough sand to do it? Ira Flatow and guests discuss engineering the nation’s coasts for “the new normal.”…

Produced by Christopher Intagliata, Associate Senior Producer.

An Interview on Science Friday

Hurricane Sandy Relief Bill Fails to Face Coastal Realities, By Rob Young
As part of the sorely-needed aid package to help victims of Hurricane Sandy, Congress is also considering spending billions on ill-advised and environmentally damaging beach and coastal rebuilding projects that ignore the looming threats of rising seas and intensifying storms.

We Need to Retreat From the Beach, By Orrin Pilkey
As ocean waters warm, the Northeast is likely to face more Sandy-like storms. And as sea levels continue to rise, the surges of these future storms will be higher and even more deadly. We can’t stop these powerful storms. But we can reduce the deaths and damage they cause…

sand-delivery-nc-coast
Sand hauling for dune construction is complete. Minor grading on the top of the dune remains. Shaping shoulders and equipment demobilization will be completed on or by Fri Jan 25, 2013. Captions and Photo source: ©© NCDOTcommunications

Green Approaches to Water Gaining Ground Around World

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Photo source: ©© Gilles Chiroleu

Excerpts;

After Hurricane Sandy swept through the northeast of the United States late October 2012, millions of New Yorkers were left for days without electricity. But they still had access to drinking water, thanks to New York City’s reliance on protected watershed areas for potable water.

Instead of using electric-powered water treatment plans, New York City brings its high-quality drinking water through aqueducts connected to protected areas in the nearby Catskill/Delaware forests and wetlands, just one example of how protecting watersheds can provide residential areas with drinking water and flood and pollution protection at bargain basement prices…

Read Full Article, IPS