New plastic garbage patch discovered in Indian Ocean

Posted In News, Pollution
Aug
10

Plastic Pollution Indian Garbage Patch

By Lori Bongiorno.

Scientists recently announced the existence of a garbage patch in the Indian Ocean, the third major collection of plastic garbage discovered in the world’s oceans. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, located in the North Pacific Ocean gyre, is well known. And more recently scientists confirmed the existence of a second garbage patch in the North Atlantic gyre.

Anna Cummins and her husband,Marcus Eriksen, cofounder of 5 Gyres Institute, report that all of the 12 water samples collected in the 3,000 miles between Perth, Australia, and Port Louis, Mauritius (an island due East of Madagascar), contain plastic.

Their findings support earlier research about trash washed onto beaches in and around the Indian Ocean, and it’s already been well established that there’s an enormous amount of plastic trash swirling in the North Pacific and North Atlantic Ocean Gyres.

“We did find another large concentration of plastic debris,” says the marine scientist who cofounded 5 Gyres Institute with his wife, Anna Cummins, to research plastic pollution in the world’s oceans. The team works in collaboration with Algalita Marine Research Foundation and Pangaea Explorations.

“There is no island of trash,” says Anna Cummins, cofounder of 5 Gyres Institute. “It’s a myth.” Instead, she says the garbage patches resemble plastic soup or confetti. “We now have a third accumulation zone of plastic pollution that shows compounding evidence that the trash isn’t condensed to an island,” she says. “It’s spread out across the entire gyre from coast to coast.The world’s oceans are covered with a thin plastic soup that’s thickest in the middle of the gyres.”

Ironically, it would be far easier to clean up the oceans if the trash were forming islands, Eriksen explains. In his opinion, it isn’t practical to try to recover the plastic from sea because most is fragmented and widely distributed. “If you stand on island beaches and mainland coastlines, you can watch the plastic coming to you. That’s where gyre clean up makes the most sense,” Eriksen says, “but we need to stop the flow of plastic into the ocean.”

The five large subtropical gyres (powerful rotating ocean currents) are located in the North Pacific, South Pacific, North Atlantic, South Atlantic, and Indian oceans. Once plastic makes its way into the ocean (through sewers, streams, rivers, or from the coast), it is ultimately swept up and trapped in these gyres and forms a swirling soup of garbage.

This Indian Ocean garbage patch discovery means there are now three confirmed ocean zones of plastic pollution, and Eriksen and Cummins expect to find others in the South Pacific and South Atlantic gyres also. The 5 Gyres Institute, a team of scientists and educators, will lead eight expeditions to explore the South Atlantic (starting later this summer) and South Pacific (scheduled for next spring).

It’s hard to visualize what these multiplying zones of plastic pollution look like. Cummins says there is a common misconception that a Texas-sized island of garbage exists off the coast of California. Eriksen says, “but we need to stop the flow of plastic into the ocean.”

The best solution, he says, is to collect debris that washes up on beaches, which act as natural nets, before it washes back into the ocean where it poses significant health risks for fish, seabirds, and other marine animals that mistake small plastic pellets for food or get tangled in discarded fishing nets.

What can we do help prevent this plastic soup from growing larger?

We can look for the new degradable bioplastics to replace conventional petroleum-based plastic. We can choose reusable items over disposables, buy less plastics overall, and help clean up beaches.

Photo Source: Zuma Press.

Original Article

Plastic Pollution: The Great Plastic Tide, Coastal Care
The world population is living, working, vacationing, increasingly conglomerating along the coasts, and standing on the front row of the greatest, most unprecedented, plastic waste tide ever faced. Washed out on our coasts in obvious and clearly visible form, the plastic pollution spectacle blatantly unveiling on our beaches is only the prelude of the greater story that unfolded further away in the world’s oceans, yet mostly originating from where we stand: the land…

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2 Comments to “New plastic garbage patch discovered in Indian Ocean”

  • its worse to see the above pic but its more worse that all our drainage lines of mumbai city are connected to arabian sea and thus coral life has vannished from our costs.we can see only mud,worms and garbage in our mumbai city ocean.even on low tide if u go inside the beach to spot some bautiful nature yours legs will be stucked 1 feet down in mud which has been collected from the drainage which is been left in arabian sea…the main source of water draiange is at worli.. government should find some alternative way to get ride of drainage water as it has harmed the costal life of mumbai beaches

  • You are so right. It’s sad the way we treat our world and it’s people. We are making it useless. We won’t survive if we don’t change. And find new ways to do things and teach the young to respect what we have.

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