Surfing from / October, 2014

What New York City Can Learn From Its Relationship With The Sea

From the days when Mannahatta island was home to the indigenous Lenape tribe to today’s five-borough metropolis that houses more than 8 million people, one thing has remained constant: the story of New York City cannot be separated from water.

Comments Off on What New York City Can Learn From Its Relationship With The Sea

Sargassum Inundates the Beaches of the Caribbean

Massive amounts of pelagic sargassum have ben washing up on Carribean beaches for the past few months. According to Mission Blue friend Martha Gilkes of Antigua, the seaweed drifts are getting as high as 3 to 4 feet on some beaches.

Comments Off on Sargassum Inundates the Beaches of the Caribbean

Retreat of the Columbia Glacier

Scientists have long studied Alaska’s fast-moving Columbia Glacier, a tidewater glacier that descends through the Chugach Mountains into Prince William Sound. Yet the river of ice continues to deliver new surprises.

Comments Off on Retreat of the Columbia Glacier

India’s Central Government To Take Up Illegal Sand Mining With States

News, Sand Mining
Oct
30

Concerned over large scale illegal sand mining across states, the Union mines ministry has convened meeting of all States and Union Territories next week to discuss the legal and administrative frameworks in place in each state to govern sand mining and the actual experience of states in handling such cases.

Comments Off on India’s Central Government To Take Up Illegal Sand Mining With States

Oceans Arrived Early to Earth, New Study Finds

Inform
Oct
30

Earth is known as the Blue Planet because of its oceans, which cover more than 70 percent of the planet’s surface and are home to the world’s greatest diversity of life. While water is essential for life on the planet, the answers to two key questions have eluded us: where did Earth’s water come from and when?

Comments Off on Oceans Arrived Early to Earth, New Study Finds

New Research Quantifies What’s Causing Sea Level to Rise

There have been a number of studies recently on ocean warming and sea-level rise. Collectively, they are helping scientists unite around an emerging understanding of climate change and its impact on the Earth.

Comments Off on New Research Quantifies What’s Causing Sea Level to Rise

Two Years After Hurricane Sandy : Fortifying New York – How Well Armored Are We For The Next Superstorm?

New York City officials expect sea levels to rise by more than 2.5 feet over the next four decades, an increase that — if not properly addressed now — could put 800,000 people’s homes underwater in the event of another storm.

Comments Off on Two Years After Hurricane Sandy : Fortifying New York – How Well Armored Are We For The Next Superstorm?

Two Years On: Sandy Storm Inspires More Climate Research

This Wednesday marks the second anniversary of Hurricane Sandy, shocking photos showed the huge extent of the destruction caused by the storm. Sandy has spurred an unprecedented amount of research, attempting to tackle the questions about what role climate change might have played in producing or worsening the storm.

Comments Off on Two Years On: Sandy Storm Inspires More Climate Research

Abbot Point: Study on Dumping of Spoil in Wetlands Not Required

The federal government has waived the need for a full environmental impact study into the dumping of dredging spoil onto sensitive wetlands under the plan to expand the Abbot Point coal port in Queensland.

Comments Off on Abbot Point: Study on Dumping of Spoil in Wetlands Not Required

Coastal Care junior
The World's Beaches
Sand Mining
One Percent