Mangrove & Coral Destruction

Miles of mangrove trees Miles of mangrove trees have died in recent years along the coast of Angola due to a combination of environmental factors, including oil spills. Photo: Joe Hughes

Widespread destruction of mangroves (Bahamas, Australia) and Coral Reefs (Caribbean, Red Sea) has resulted in the loss of some of the worlds most diverse ecosystems. As a side effect, this has greatly increased shoreline hazards and beach erosion rates. The greatest benefit of mangroves is their ability to reduce storm surge. This benefit is long-term and requires no maintenance. The 1999 super typhoon, Orissa, killed over 10,000 people in India drowning many with its powerful storm surge. This number could have been lower if the mangroves had been retained. Mangroves are lost because of clearing for development, logging, and shrimp farming. Coral reefs are lost by mining (Bali, Indonesia), sedimentation from agriculture on the upland (St. Croix, Virgin Islands), bad fishing techniques that kill corals (Pacific Islands), sedimentation from nourished beaches (Waikiki) and a host of other natural and global warming-related causes. Dubai is perhaps the single greatest example of coral reef destruction. The artificial islands built there buried vast coral reefs. Mangroves and coral reefs often provide protection for nearby beaches. Their destruction harms the beach as well.


Surfing in / Mangrove and Coral Destruction

Queensland’s mangrove ecosystem dying in secret

mangrove-roots-coastalcare

There have been large scale diebacks of mangrove trees in the Gulf of Carpentaria. Scientists are not exactly sure what happened up there in the most remote areas of Queensland, but they know the damage is extensive and unprecedented.

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Mangroves die-off in Queensland’s Gulf Country and Limmen Bight

mangrove-coastalcare

Experts have been focusing on hundreds of kilometres of mangroves along the coast in Queensland, that have turned a ghostly white. Serious concerns about the situation, which is compared to coral bleaching happening on the Great Barrier Reef, which is the result of warmer ocean temperatures, are raised.

Comments Off on Mangroves die-off in Queensland’s Gulf Country and Limmen Bight

Continental drift created biologically diverse coral reefs

coral-coastal-care-polynesia

An international research team has studied the geographical pattern of the evolution of corals and reef fish. Their findings show that today’s geographical distribution of tropical marine diversity is the result of 100 million years of Earth history and the continental drifts that shifted the position of shallow reef habitats.

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Florida’s coral reefs rapidly ‘wasting away’ under stress of climate change

coral-coastal-care

Accelerated acidification of coastal waters has brought about structural decline of only reef in continental US, initially pegged by scientists at around 2050

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Students Reviving Mangrove Wetlands, Bahamas

mangrove-seedlings

Students participated in a pilot programme called the Bahamas Awareness of Mangroves (BAM), a project about mangrove education and restoration.

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Endangered mangroves found in Cairns, Queensland

mangrove-coastalcare

An endangered species of mangrove previously found only in Asia has been discovered in far north Queensland. Environmentalists hope the discovery of mangrove species in north Queensland will aid calls for greater protection of fragile wetlands.

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New database gives scientists hope for helping coral reefs

coral-reef-coastal-care

With the future of coral reefs threatened now more than ever, researchers have announced the release of a new global database that enables scientists and managers to more quickly and effectively help corals survive their many challenges.

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Great Barrier Reef coral bleaching hits “extreme level”

coral-coastal-care-2

Coral bleaching, a phenomenon that can result in the widespread die-off of coral life, is a serious problem facing the world’s oceans, and according to a new aerial survey of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, 95 percent of the reef’s northern section is now bleached, Australian Broadcasting Corporation reports.

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Desert mangroves are major source of carbon storage, study shows

mangrove-coastalcare-2

Short, stunted mangroves living along the coastal desert of Baja California store up to five times more carbon below ground than their lush, tropical counterparts, researchers have found. The new study estimates that coastal desert mangroves, which only account for 1 percent of the land area, store nearly 30 percent of the region’s belowground carbon.

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Recent / Mangrove and Coral Destruction

Queensland’s mangrove ecosystem dying in secret

mangrove-roots-coastalcare

May 20th, 2016

There have been large scale diebacks of mangrove trees in the Gulf of Carpentaria. Scientists are not exactly sure what happened up there in the most remote areas of Queensland, but they know the damage is extensive and unprecedented.

Read More

Mangroves die-off in Queensland’s Gulf Country and Limmen Bight

mangrove-coastalcare

May 13th, 2016

Experts have been focusing on hundreds of kilometres of mangroves along the coast in Queensland, that have turned a ghostly white. Serious concerns about the situation, which is compared to coral bleaching happening on the Great Barrier Reef, which is the result of warmer ocean temperatures, are raised.

Read More

Continental drift created biologically diverse coral reefs

coral-coastal-care-polynesia

May 7th, 2016

An international research team has studied the geographical pattern of the evolution of corals and reef fish. Their findings show that today’s geographical distribution of tropical marine diversity is the result of 100 million years of Earth history and the continental drifts that shifted the position of shallow reef habitats.

Read More

Florida’s coral reefs rapidly ‘wasting away’ under stress of climate change

coral-coastal-care

May 4th, 2016

Accelerated acidification of coastal waters has brought about structural decline of only reef in continental US, initially pegged by scientists at around 2050

Read More

Students Reviving Mangrove Wetlands, Bahamas

mangrove-seedlings

April 27th, 2016

Students participated in a pilot programme called the Bahamas Awareness of Mangroves (BAM), a project about mangrove education and restoration.

Read More

Endangered mangroves found in Cairns, Queensland

mangrove-coastalcare

April 13th, 2016

An endangered species of mangrove previously found only in Asia has been discovered in far north Queensland. Environmentalists hope the discovery of mangrove species in north Queensland will aid calls for greater protection of fragile wetlands.

Read More

New database gives scientists hope for helping coral reefs

coral-reef-coastal-care

April 9th, 2016

With the future of coral reefs threatened now more than ever, researchers have announced the release of a new global database that enables scientists and managers to more quickly and effectively help corals survive their many challenges.

Read More

Great Barrier Reef coral bleaching hits “extreme level”

coral-coastal-care-2

April 4th, 2016

Coral bleaching, a phenomenon that can result in the widespread die-off of coral life, is a serious problem facing the world’s oceans, and according to a new aerial survey of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, 95 percent of the reef’s northern section is now bleached, Australian Broadcasting Corporation reports.

Read More

Desert mangroves are major source of carbon storage, study shows

mangrove-coastalcare-2

March 31st, 2016

Short, stunted mangroves living along the coastal desert of Baja California store up to five times more carbon below ground than their lush, tropical counterparts, researchers have found. The new study estimates that coastal desert mangroves, which only account for 1 percent of the land area, store nearly 30 percent of the region’s belowground carbon.

Read More

Sinking a Mexican Navy Warship: A GoPro Awards Video

sinking-ship-mexico

March 11th, 2016

The Uribe 121, a former Mexican Navy battleship, was sunk 1.2 miles off the coast of Rosario, Mexico, to create the first artificial reef in Baja California.

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