Mangrove & Coral Destruction

Miles of mangrove trees Miles of mangrove trees have died in recent years along the coast of Angola due to a combination of environmental factors, including oil spills. Photo: Joe Hughes

Widespread destruction of mangroves (Bahamas, Australia) and Coral Reefs (Caribbean, Red Sea) has resulted in the loss of some of the worlds most diverse ecosystems. As a side effect, this has greatly increased shoreline hazards and beach erosion rates. The greatest benefit of mangroves is their ability to reduce storm surge. This benefit is long-term and requires no maintenance. The 1999 super typhoon, Orissa, killed over 10,000 people in India drowning many with its powerful storm surge. This number could have been lower if the mangroves had been retained. Mangroves are lost because of clearing for development, logging, and shrimp farming. Coral reefs are lost by mining (Bali, Indonesia), sedimentation from agriculture on the upland (St. Croix, Virgin Islands), bad fishing techniques that kill corals (Pacific Islands), sedimentation from nourished beaches (Waikiki) and a host of other natural and global warming-related causes. Dubai is perhaps the single greatest example of coral reef destruction. The artificial islands built there buried vast coral reefs. Mangroves and coral reefs often provide protection for nearby beaches. Their destruction harms the beach as well.


Surfing in / Mangrove and Coral Destruction

Artificial Reef Enhancement Underway, North Carolina

oyster-reef-conservation

Over the next couple months, more than 2 million tons of concrete material will be dropped over local artificial reefs, providing habitat for ocean life on barren stretches of the sea floor.

No comments

Warm Ocean Temperatures May Mean Major Coral Bleaching

coral-coastal-care-fp

NOAA scientists are warning that warm ocean temperatures in the tropical Pacific and Indian Oceans could set the stage for major coral bleaching events across the globe in 2015.

No comments

Great Barrier Reef: Warmer Waters Helping Coral-Eating Starfish Thrive

coral-eating-starfish

The survival chances of crown-of-thorns starfish increase by as much as 240% if sea-surface temperatures rise 2C, say Australian researchers.

No comments

To Save Coral Reefs, First Save the Mangroves

coeur-de-voh

With coral reefs in decline and NOAA calling for a larger protected area for reefs in the Gulf of Mexico, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are pointing out another strategy to save reefs: First save the mangroves.

No comments

Study Projects Unprecedented Loss of Corals in Great Barrier Reef Due to Warming

coral-reef-coastal-care

The coverage of living corals on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef could decline to less than 10 percent if ocean warming continues, according to a new study that explores the short- and long-term consequences of environmental changes to the reef.

No comments

Hidden Battles on the Reefs

coral-coastal-care

How do you drown a coral reef? The very idea seems unfathomable for animals that spend their entire lives under water. But the deep ocean is actually riddled with “drowned” coral reefs, the remains of ancient reefs that slipped into the dark ocean depths and starved without sunlight.

No comments

Coral Reefs Threatened by Changing Ocean Conditions

coral-coastal-care

Erosion rates increase tenfold in areas where corals are also exposed to high levels of nutrients, according to a study published January 2015 in the journal Geology. As sea level rises, these reefs may have a harder time growing toward the ocean surface, where they get sunlight they need to survive.

No comments

UN Sends Team to Clean Up Sunderbans Oil Spill in Bangladesh

sundarbans-tiger

The United Nations said on Thursday it has sent a team of international experts to Bangladesh to help clean up the world’s largest mangrove forest, more than a week after it was hit by a huge oil spill.

No comments

Acidic Oceans Could Quiet Coral Reefs

coral-coastal-care-polynesia

Scientists have been monitoring underwater sounds for decades, in part because sound propagates so efficiently underwater. But in the past 10 years, scientists have started exploring how sonic cues influence fish behavior and give a snapshot of reef health and biodiversity.

No comments


Recent / Mangrove and Coral Destruction

Artificial Reef Enhancement Underway, North Carolina

oyster-reef-conservation

February 26th, 2015

Over the next couple months, more than 2 million tons of concrete material will be dropped over local artificial reefs, providing habitat for ocean life on barren stretches of the sea floor.

Read More

Warm Ocean Temperatures May Mean Major Coral Bleaching

coral-coastal-care-fp

February 18th, 2015

NOAA scientists are warning that warm ocean temperatures in the tropical Pacific and Indian Oceans could set the stage for major coral bleaching events across the globe in 2015.

Read More

Great Barrier Reef: Warmer Waters Helping Coral-Eating Starfish Thrive

coral-eating-starfish

February 15th, 2015

The survival chances of crown-of-thorns starfish increase by as much as 240% if sea-surface temperatures rise 2C, say Australian researchers.

Read More

To Save Coral Reefs, First Save the Mangroves

coeur-de-voh

February 10th, 2015

With coral reefs in decline and NOAA calling for a larger protected area for reefs in the Gulf of Mexico, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are pointing out another strategy to save reefs: First save the mangroves.

Read More

Study Projects Unprecedented Loss of Corals in Great Barrier Reef Due to Warming

coral-reef-coastal-care

January 22nd, 2015

The coverage of living corals on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef could decline to less than 10 percent if ocean warming continues, according to a new study that explores the short- and long-term consequences of environmental changes to the reef.

Read More

Hidden Battles on the Reefs

coral-coastal-care

January 13th, 2015

How do you drown a coral reef? The very idea seems unfathomable for animals that spend their entire lives under water. But the deep ocean is actually riddled with “drowned” coral reefs, the remains of ancient reefs that slipped into the dark ocean depths and starved without sunlight.

Read More

Coral Reefs Threatened by Changing Ocean Conditions

coral-coastal-care

January 10th, 2015

Erosion rates increase tenfold in areas where corals are also exposed to high levels of nutrients, according to a study published January 2015 in the journal Geology. As sea level rises, these reefs may have a harder time growing toward the ocean surface, where they get sunlight they need to survive.

Read More

UN Sends Team to Clean Up Sunderbans Oil Spill in Bangladesh

sundarbans-tiger

December 18th, 2014

The United Nations said on Thursday it has sent a team of international experts to Bangladesh to help clean up the world’s largest mangrove forest, more than a week after it was hit by a huge oil spill.

Read More

Acidic Oceans Could Quiet Coral Reefs

coral-coastal-care-polynesia

December 18th, 2014

Scientists have been monitoring underwater sounds for decades, in part because sound propagates so efficiently underwater. But in the past 10 years, scientists have started exploring how sonic cues influence fish behavior and give a snapshot of reef health and biodiversity.

Read More

Oil Spill in Bangladesh’s Unique Mangrove Forest

tiger-mangrove

December 17th, 2014

On December 12, three days after a cargo vessel collided with a tanker, oil coats mangrove trees in the Sundarbans, a delta that forms the world’s largest contiguous tidal mangrove forest—a haven for a spectacular diversity of animals. More than 90,000 gallons of oil have spilled into the rivers and creeks of the region.

Read More