Tag Archives: Photo of the Month

Light Leak ; By Ray Collins

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“Light Leak.” All rights reserved. © Ray Collins

By© Ray Collins

“The relationship between water and light has fascinated me since i was a child. I would put my arms around my mother’s shoulders and she would glide underwater. I can still see the beams of light bending and shimmering.

As time went on I developed a close relationship with the pacific, spending my mornings and afternoons and any free time at all there.

The ocean has taught me many life long lessons. Two of them enabled me to make this image, Patience and Respect.”—Ray

Ray Collins Photo

Polynesian Sun; By JBen

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POM-Polynesia-sun-max

By © JBen Art

From the Polynesian Series.

This image, the sixth from “The Polynesian Series,” represents a polynesian sun drawn on the sand of my favorite place of inspiration: La Grande Côte’s beach, in Charente- Maritime, Western coast of France.

This Polynesian Sun beach art drawing is amongst my dearest creation, as it revealed itself to be the utmost challenging one then, taking three and a half hours to create.

JBen Art, Learn More

See Also From The Polynesian Series By JBen: Photo Of the Month March 2015

JBen Art, on Facebook

Polynesian Turtle; By JBen

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POM-Jben-03-2015-full

By © JBen Art

From the Polynesian Series.

As the beach becomes canvas, this image represents a polynesian turtle drawn on La Grande Côte’s beach sand, in Charente- Maritime, surrounded by Blockhaus ruins from WWII.

I particularly enjoy the feel and energy emanating from this beach, where I am inspired to create. This beach art is the second sand drawing I have ever created and it is the one that led me to keep on this sand art path… now a true passion.

JBen Art, Learn More

JBen Art, on Facebook

Eight Gabions; By Mary Flynn

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POM-Gabions-01-2015-max

Gabions at Standpoint exhibition Quay Arts West Gallery, Newport, Isle of Wight
‘8 Gabions’ (2012)
Galvanised wire and plastic salvaged from the shore;
45cm x 45cm x 45cm;
NFS.

By © Mary Flynn

“The shores of the Isle of Wight are littered with plastic waste.

‘8 Gabions’ is created from plastics collected from the beach. These have been broken and altered by the action of the sea and weather but retain echoes of a former existence. A conflict is created between the bright, playful colours of the objects contrasting with the evidence they provide of the way people pollute the natural world.

This catalogue of objects is held within wire gabions and organised by colour. Gabions usually hold back the sea or land, acting as a stabilising force. In the gallery context, ‘8 Gabions’ become a commentary on the human impact on the environment.

My standpoint is concern for changes in the environment. Researchers are examining plastic pollution in our oceans and the impact of plastics on marine life, the human food chain and fertility. I communicate my concern through my work.”—Mary

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‘8 Gabions’ Close-Up Study
Galvanised wire and plastic salvaged from the shore.
Gabions at Standpoint exhibition Quay Arts West Gallery 2012, Newport, Isle of Wight.

Isle of Wight Arts

Art Lost; By David Kassman

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By © David Kassman

“For over twenty years, David Kassman has traveled across continents, taking photographs of the people and places he encounters. His images of urban and rural communities often focus on themes of identity and cultural displacement. Kassman’s works­- from portraits of tribesmen in the African bush to a series of photographs of a fully costumed Spiderman running through cultural touch-points including Times Square and the Egyptian pyramids- are captivating and revelatory.

Lost represents a departure from Kassman’s previous work in still photography. The exhibition centers around two video installations of garbage swirling beneath a bridge on the Tiber River in Rome. Played in a nonstop loop, both videos capture the frantic movement of the human detritus that has accumulated in a single spot: plastic bottles, containers, and sports balls. The refuse tumbles together, like clothing in a laundry machine, all sinking and rising in a jumbled chaos.

The exhibition also features a lightbox work and eight large-scale photographic prints that depict the scene from three distinct angles. The precision and crisp detail in each photograph accentuates the singularity of the objects within the frame: the saturated colors of the bottles, and the clarity of the bubbles and foam at the surface of the Tiber. Seen together, the images immerse the viewer in a disorienting kaleidoscope of moving water and flotsam.

The objects, discarded and forgotten, have traveled unknown distances and ultimately collected here. But they have not stopped moving. In what Kassman refers to as a “massive installation of pollution,” the individual pieces of trash continue to fight to stay afloat. The work is hypnotic and meditative and it is difficult not to feel an affinity with the empty soda bottles and soccer balls that have become stuck in this unending struggle.

The journey of the trash down the river can also be seen as a reflection of the complexity of migrations that occur in today’s globalized society. Refugees and survivors who have been displaced by war and persecution must struggle to find a place to live. Security and stability can be fleeting, and people from different backgrounds often find themselves brought together by political currents, living day to day, simply trying to catch a breath of air and not be pulled under. This is a narrative that is particularly resonant in the artist’s homeland.

David Kassman was born in 1971 in Israel. His photographs have been exhibited in galleries and private collections all over the world. He teaches photography at Shankar University of Art in Tel Aviv and has worked with Donna Karan’s Urban Zen Foundation since 2007.” —Winston Wächter Fine Art, New York

Winston Wächter Fine Art, New York is pleased to announce its first solo exhibition with Israeli photographer, David Kassman.

Art Lost Video, From David Kassman

Plastic Pollution: “When The Mermaids Cry: The Great Plastic Tide,” Coastal Care

Shallow Water Soloing, Pounders Beach, Oahu; By Ryan Moss

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Justin-Ridgely-Free-Soloing-Hawaii-1024

By © Ryan Moss

“The Ocean has a way of washing away all your fear and pain. It is a provider, as well as a teacher. It has many faces that we will never see. The ocean doesn’t care how rich or poor you are. The ocean doesn’t care what your religion is, your skin color, or what type of car you drive. The ocean will always be there waiting for you, with open arms. If we are lucky enough to experience that single moment, where amongst all the chaos we find that moment of peace and clarity. Then we in fact are the lucky ones, the ones who have stumbled upon true wealth.”

Follow Ryan Moss on Instagram @Ryan.Moss