Category Archives: Celebrate

10 Best Beaches in Costa Rica

Costa Rica by Nancy Optiz
Costa Rica. Photo courtesy of: © Nancy Opitz & Terry Simms

Excerpts;

With two oceans and 800 miles of coastline, it’s easy to see why there are so many great beaches in Costa Rica. And while swimming presents a risk at most beaches due to a wicked undertow (which spells heaven for surfers), there are still plenty of strands of sand for an enjoyable day or week at the beach. Here are some of Fodor’s favorites, from the north to the south down the Pacific coast, and then to the Caribbean…

Read Full Article; Fodor (10-08-2019)

Action Climate – II ; By HA Schult

pom-march-2014-max

pom-march-2014-max

By © HA Schult
Image originally published on: April 1st, 2014

HA Schult was one of the first artists to deal with the ecological imbalances in his work.

He is a major contributor to today`s new ecological awareness.

His works were on show on all continents. They are in many private and public collections all over the world… HA Schult Art is Life

HA Schult Art is Life, on Facebook

In celebration of Coastal Care’s 10 years Anniversary, we are republishing an acclaimed selection of the most popular Photo Of the Month contributions.

“Our Deepest Gratitude And Thanks To Our Talented And Inspiring Photo Of The Month Photographers Contributors. —Santa Aguila Foundation – Coastal Care”

Is that a choir of Angels or just a day at the beach: Singing Sands you have to hear to believe


Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

Even in their simplest forms, beaches are spectacular places. Some, however, claim an even more magical level of excellence thanks to peculiar properties boasted by their sands…

Read Full Article; Fodor Travel (09-15-2019)

“Barking Sand”, excerpts from Lessons From The Sand ; A Book By Charles O. Pilkey & Orrin H. Pilkey (04-03-2016)

Sand Color Palette
Most beach sand color ranges from pale cream to golden to caramel, but in select places around the world, sand can be red, pink, orange, chocolate, gold, purple, green, or black…

The Colors Of Beach Sand; By Gary Griggs

24 Unusual Beaches You Might Never Have Heard Of Before; WhenOnEarth (09-10-2015)
A singing beach, a glowing beach, a beach with rainbow-colored sand — here are the most offbeat seaside destinations you’ll find on Earth…

Scientist Finds ‘Hawaiian Beach’ Sand On Mars, Phys Org (10-28-2013)

Star Sand Beach In Iriomote Island, Japan; WhenOnEarth (02-23-2015)

A Grain of Sand – Nature’s Secret Wonder, A Book By Dr. Gary Greenberg
Every grain of sand is a jewel waiting to be discovered. That’s what Dr. Gary Greenberg found when he first turned his microscope on beach sand. Author and photographer Dr. Gary Greenberg is a visual artist who creatively combines art with science. Since 2001, Dr. Greenberg focuses his microscopes on common objects, such as grains of sand, flowers, and food. These everyday objects take on a new reality when magnified hundreds of times, revealing hidden and unexpected aspects of nature. Dr. Greenberg’s images of sand make us realize that as we walk along a beach we are strolling upon thousands of years of biological and geological history…

Beach Color, Coastal Care

Ocean trash is building up. This artist reveals what’s out there.

POM-sea-life-Barry-Rosenthal-MAX

POM-sea-life-Barry-Rosenthal-MAX
“Sea Life.” © 2016 Barry Rosenthal.
“Found in Nature” series
All rights remain the property of Barry Rosenthal.
Originally published in Coastal Care October 1, 2016.

Excerpts;

Barry Rosenthal started collecting plastic garbage on a New York shoreline. His photographs reveal the variety of water-borne trash…

Read Full Article; National Geographic (09-12-2019)

Morocco – II ; By Lana Wong

Morocco by Lana Wong

By © Lana Wong

Inspired by the rugged beauty of the Moroccan coast, Lana Wong photographed this scene in the summer of 2005. We are pleased to feature it as our Photo of the Month for April 2009.

Lana Wong is an American photographer based in Paris. She founded and directed the Shootback Project, a youth photography and development program in Nairobi, Kenya which culminated in the publication of Shootback: Photos by Kids from the Nairobi Slums. Wong studied photography at Harvard University, and the Royal College of Art, London.

In celebration of Coastal Care’s 10 years Anniversary, we are republishing an acclaimed selection of the most popular Photo Of the Month contributions.
“Our Deepest Gratitude And Thanks To Our Talented And Inspiring Photo Of The Month Photographers Contributors. —Santa Aguila Foundation – Coastal Care”

The end of the world’s most famous beaches – II ; By Orrin H. Pilkey and J. Andrew G. Cooper


Guaruja-Brazil-Kalafatis. Photo source: © Orrin Pilkey.

By Orrin H. Pilkey, James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of Geology, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC, and J. Andrew G. Cooper, Professor of Coastal Studies, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine, Northern Ireland.

Originally published on: August 1st, 2017

All over the world there are beaches lined with condos, hotels, restaurants and the like, in high-rise buildings (i.e., skyscrapers). Such beaches are generally the nation’s premier tourist areas, important to the local people and the local economy and prime spots for national and international vacationers. The powers that be in most of these places continue high-rise construction and seem oblivious of the sea level rise. They do not recognize that a few decades down the road the recreational beach, the raison d’être for the community’s existence, is forever doomed. We discuss this coming calamity in our book The Last Beach.

Famously, the mayor of Miami Beach, Florida, is one local politician who sees the sea level rise as a threat to the future well-being of his community. He has stated that they are seeking high-end (luxurious) developments to provide an ample tax base for responding to the sea level rise in the future. The nature of the response is unclear at this time although there is talk of raising some of the high-rise buildings to allow storm surge waves to pass under them.

The global problem with high-rise-lined beaches is their inflexibility. Realistically the buildings can’t be moved back. It is far too costly to raise or move hundreds of very large buildings to higher ground. Often, there is no place where buildings can be moved back to safety.

“The global problem with high-rise-lined beaches is their inflexibility. ”
— O. Pilkey & A. Cooper

Most of these heavily developed beach communities are fronted with artificial (nourished) beaches. The problem is that as the level of the sea rises, the beach nourishment sand will become less and less stable and more and more costly. The natural shoreline, unhindered by development, would be thousands of feet back and 2 or 3 feet higher than the shoreline held in place by the nourished beach. Nourished beach lifespans would rapidly decrease to the point that artificial beach construction would no longer be useful or feasible. The buildings would then have to be protected by large seawalls which would, in themselves, increase the rate of artificial beach loss.

Thus, beaches in front of the high rises will be gone. Much of the tourist industry must move elsewhere. Perhaps Cape May, New Jersey, is an example of the problem. The beach disappeared in the early 20th century as a result of placement of a large seawall. The seawall caused the problem there, not sea level rise. For most of the twentieth century, Cape May was without a beach and promenading on the top of the wall was the major beach activity.

Recife, Brazil, is an example of a beach community that has basically given up on the ocean beach but has placed a band of sand behind a large rock revetment for vacationers to feel the sand on their bare feet. Here, beach volleyball pitches have been squeezed in, as well as spaces for sunbathing. These sand pits, however, are a poor substitute for a natural beach–they have none of the protective functions of a beach, they need to be continually maintained, and they act as giant cat litters (and repositories for all sorts of other objectionable trash). This may be the future for all the high-rise-lined beaches.

Where will our main tourist beaches be when these ones disappear? What will become of all of the beach infrastructure when there is no beach? Will we learn a new way of living with beaches that allows us to co-exist? We don’t have a crystal ball, but it is our hope that high-rise-lined beaches will become a thing of the past and that we will find a new way to allow people to enjoy the beach without destroying it.

In celebration of Coastal Care’s 10 years Anniversary, we are republishing an acclaimed selection of the most popular Beach Of the Month contributions.
“Our Deepest Gratitude And Thanks To Our Talented And Inspiring Beach Of The Month Authors Contributors —Santa Aguila Foundation – Coastal Care”