Category Archives: Sea Level Rise

As waters rise, coastal megacities like Mumbai face catastrophe


Mumbai and other fast-growing coastal megacities in Asia are particularly vulnerable to climate-related flooding. Twenty-one of the world’s 31 megacities hug a coastline, 13 of which are in Asia. These cities of 10 million or more often drive their national economies and are home to both rich and poor. Captions and Photo source: Science News / Janak Rathod

Excerpts;

Climate change is raising sea levels, while also making storms more severe and bringing heavier rains to some places. For densely populated coastal cities like Mumbai — the financial heart of India, which is the world’s fastest-growing major economy — those risks threaten to throw personal incomes and national economies into chaos…

Mumbai’s current predicament is partly due to the power of engineering over nature. Large parts of the city are built on land that, 300 years ago, was mostly underwater. When the Portuguese settled the region in the 16th century, they maintained Mumbai as a sleepy collection of coastal islands. But the British, who took over in 1661, reimagined Mumbai as a contiguous landmass and created a peninsula by filling in land gaps to connect the islands even in the wet season…

Read Full Article, Science News (08-15-2018)

Rising sea levels threatens coastal cities with more tsunamis, scientists warn; The Telegraph UK (08-15-2018)
Tsunamis will become more common and more ferocious with global warming, scientists have warned after a study found that global sea level rises will increase the risk of coastal cities being wiped out…

Cities from the sea: the true cost of reclaimed land; Guardian UK (05-02-2018)

Sea-level rise and the precious commodity of sand; The Coast News (05-17-2018)

Satellite photos reveal how Mumbai killed its mangrove forests to risk epic floods; Quartz (08-30-2017)
Mumbai is essentially a peninsula jutting into the Arabian Sea. Since the 1980s, the city’s population has more than doubled. That’s led to rapid urbanisation of the surrounding areas, as well as encroachment of the mangroves on the city’s edges…

10 Beaches at risk of disappearing

rio-coastal-urbanization
Copacabana beach, Rio, Brazil. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

All over the world, beaches —where we go to unwind and get away from the stress of our daily lives— are in peril. Globally, climate change has seen sea levels rise about 8 inches since 1880. If we don’t make some sort of drastic change in our lifestyles, levels are projected to go up another one to four feet by 2100, with some scientists betting on even higher figures as Antarctica melts.

Here’s what that means for our beloved beaches: erosion, cliff disintegration, flooding, saltwater infiltrating freshwater, and possibly, complete destruction…

Read Full Article; Condé Nast Traveler (08-23-2018)

” The Last Beach,” a book by Orrin H. Pilkey And J. Andrew G. Cooper
“In The Last Beach, the authors describe the top five threats to beaches around the world. Even a quick overview of these threats suggests a strategy for confronting the degradation and loss of beaches. It’s no surprise that a comprehensive, long-term beach protection strategy requires significant changes to our economic system, a system that has overdeveloped and polluted beaches to the extent that they have become unhealthy places to swim or even play in the sand…”—Countercurrents

The end of the world’s most famous beaches; By Orrin H. Pilkey and J. Andrew G. Cooper (08-01-2017)
All over the world there are beaches lined with condos, hotels, restaurants and the like, in high-rise buildings (i.e., skyscrapers). Such beaches are generally the nation’s premier tourist areas, important to the local people and the local economy and prime spots for national and international vacationers. The powers that be in most of these places continue high-rise construction and seem oblivious of the sea level rise…

Let’s end war with ocean, Op-Ed by Orrin H. Pilkey
The immediate future most certainly holds more miles of sandbags, resulting in more narrowed and ugly beaches.But this trend can be halted and reversed. Now is the time to make peace with the ocean.The time is now to stop sandbagging, both physically with no more shore-hardening structures, and politically with no more exceptions to the intent of the rules, no more undermining existing legislation, and a return to enforcement…

The only answer to rising seas is to retreat; By Orrin H. Pilkey & Keith C. Pilkey; The News & Observer (10-18-2017)

Sand Is in Such High Demand, People Are Stealing Tons of It, By Dave Roos; HowStuffWorks (03-06-2017)
As strange as it may sound, sand is one of the world’s hottest commodities. The global construction boom has created an insatiable appetite for sand, the chief ingredient for making concrete. The problem is that sand isn’t as abundant as it used to be. And when high demand and high value meets scarcity, you open the doors to smuggling…

Sand, Rarer Than One Thinks: A UNEP report (GEA-March 2014)
Despite the colossal quantities of sand and gravel being used, our increasing dependence on them and the significant impact that their extraction has on the environment, this issue has been mostly ignored by policy makers and remains largely unknown by the general public.
In March 2014 The United Nations released its first Report about sand mining. “Sand Wars” film documentary by Denis Delestrac – first broadcasted on the european Arte Channel, May 28th, 2013, where it became the highest rated documentary for 2013 – expressly inspired the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to publish this 2014-Global Environmental Alert.

The Conservation Crisis No One Is Talking About, By John R. Platt, TakePart (09-21-2016)
Beaches around the world are disappearing. No, the cause isn’t sea-level rise, at least not this time. It’s a little-known but enormous industry called sand mining, which every year sucks up billions of tons of sand from beaches, ocean floors, and rivers to make everything from concrete to microchips to toothpaste…

Sea level rise is already eroding home values, unbeknownst to their owners


Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

Boineau is one of many homeowners on the front lines of society’s confrontation with climate change, living in houses where rising sea levels have worsened flooding not just in extreme events like hurricanes, but also heavy rains and even high tides.

Now, three studies have found evidence that the threat of higher seas is also undermining coastal property values, as home buyers – particularly investors – begin the retreat to higher ground…

Read Full Article, NOLA (08-21-2018)

Sea level rise has already sunk Carolinas beach property values — by $1.6 billion, study finds; News & Observer (07-25-2018)
Sea levels are rising and the southeast has already lost billions in property value, a recent study shows. Scientists have found $7.4 billion was lost in home values across North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia and Florida because of sea level rise flooding from 2005 to 2017…

Coastal homes could see flood insurance premium going up again, and that’s only the beginning; Miami Herald (07-24-2018)

Flooding from sea level rise threatens over 300,000 US coastal homes – study; Guardian UK (06-18-2018)

Rising seas threaten nearly $1 trillion worth of US homes, and most of them are moderately priced; CNBC (10-18-2017)

Sea Level Rise Will Reshape U.S. Population In All 50 States; Yale E360 (04-19-2017)
Sea level rise could cause mass migrations that will affect not just the United States’ East Coast, but reshape communities deep in the heart of the country, according to new research…

Coastal residents need to set aside money now to cope with future flooding; Sun Sentinel (07-10-2018)
Sea-level rise is a national economic insecurity. According to the National Ocean Service, 39 percent of the U.S. population in 2010 lived in counties that are on shorelines…

How rising seas and coastal storms drowned the U.S. flood insurance program, Yale E360 (04-19-2017)
Sea level rise and more severe storms are overwhelming U.S. coastal communities, causing billions of dollars in damage and essentially bankrupting the federal flood insurance program. Yet rebuilding continues, despite warnings that far more properties will soon be underwater…

The next five years will shape sea level rise for the next 300, study says; The Washington Post (02-20-2018)
Peaking global carbon dioxide emissions as soon as possible is crucial for limiting the risks of sea-level rise, even if global warming is limited to well below 2 degrees C. A new study analyzes for the first time the sea-level legacy until 2300 within the constraints of the Paris Agreement…

New Study Finds Sea Level Rise Accelerating; NASA (02-13-2018)
Global sea level rise is accelerating incrementally over time rather than increasing at a steady rate, as previously thought, according to a new study based on 25 years of NASA and European satellite data…

Federal report: High-tide flooding could happen ‘every other day’ by late this century; The Washington Post (03-28-2018)

Surrendering to rising seas; Scientific American (08-2018)
Coastal communities struggling to adapt to climate change are beginning to do what was once unthinkable: retreat…

Cost of Coastal Flooding in Europe Could Reach $1 Trillion Annually by 2100


Etretat, Normandy, France. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

Without additional climate change adaptation measures, the annual cost of damage from coastal flooding in Europe could jump from $1.4 billion today to as much as $1 trillion by the end of the century due largely to rising sea levels, according to a new analysis published in the journal Nature Climate Change.

These coastal floods could impact up to 3.65 million people in Europe annually by 2100, compared to 102,000 today…

Read Full Article; Yale E360 (08-13-2018)

Europe needs coastal adaptation measures to avoid catastrophic flooding by the end of the century; Science Daily (08-13-2018)

The only answer to rising seas is to retreat; By Orrin H. Pilkey & Keith C. Pilkey; The News & Observer (10-18-2017)
Except for the timing, there is no controversy among scientists regarding sea level rise. Defending the coast and holding the shoreline in place ultimately will be futile. With a three-foot or a six-foot sea level rise, we will retreat, probably beginning within the next 50 years…

“A place in crisis”: Author documents life on disappearing Tangier Island


Tangier Island, Virginia. Photo source: USACE HQ

Excerpts;

Tangier Island, which is home to about 450 people, is slowly disappearing due to sea level change and shoreline erosion…

Read Full Article; CBS News (08-11-2018)

727 People on Chesapeake Bay Island Could Become America’s First ‘Climate Refugees’; LiveScience (12-15-2015)
Rising seas will likely render the last inhabited island in Virginia uninhabitable in 50 years, a new study finds…

On the Chesapeake, A Precarious Future of Rising Seas and High Tides; Video; Yale E360 (01-22-2018)

Tangier Island: Another Disappearing Island In The Chesapeake Bay, a BBC Video Documentary (11-29-2011)
Tangier Island lies in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay and is 92 miles (148km) southeast of Washington, DC. This small piece of land is barely above sea level and its 500 residents are fighting for its survival…

Sea level rise has already sunk Carolinas beach property values — by $1.6 billion, study finds

topsail-denis-delestrac
Topsail beach erosion, North Carolina. Photo courtesy of: © Denis Delestrac

Excerpts;

Sea levels are rising and the southeast has already lost billions in property value, a recent study shows.

Scientists have found $7.4 billion was lost in home values across North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia and Florida because of sea level rise flooding from 2005 to 2017.

Scientists at First Street Foundation — a technology nonprofit dedicated to increasing awareness of sea level rise — used data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Geological Survey, local governments, the National Weather Service and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to estimate flood risks…

Read Full Article, News & Observer (07-25-2018)

Coastal homes could see flood insurance premium going up again, and that’s only the beginning; Miami Herald (07-24-2018)

Flooding from sea level rise threatens over 300,000 US coastal homes – study; Guardian UK (06-18-2018)

Rising seas threaten nearly $1 trillion worth of US homes, and most of them are moderately priced; CNBC (10-18-2017)

Sea Level Rise Will Reshape U.S. Population In All 50 States; Yale E360 (04-19-2017)
Sea level rise could cause mass migrations that will affect not just the United States’ East Coast, but reshape communities deep in the heart of the country, according to new research…

Coastal residents need to set aside money now to cope with future flooding; Sun Sentinel (07-10-2018)
Sea-level rise is a national economic insecurity. According to the National Ocean Service, 39 percent of the U.S. population in 2010 lived in counties that are on shorelines…

How rising seas and coastal storms drowned the U.S. flood insurance program, Yale E360 (04-19-2017)
Sea level rise and more severe storms are overwhelming U.S. coastal communities, causing billions of dollars in damage and essentially bankrupting the federal flood insurance program. Yet rebuilding continues, despite warnings that far more properties will soon be underwater…

The next five years will shape sea level rise for the next 300, study says; The Washington Post (02-20-2018)
Peaking global carbon dioxide emissions as soon as possible is crucial for limiting the risks of sea-level rise, even if global warming is limited to well below 2 degrees C. A new study analyzes for the first time the sea-level legacy until 2300 within the constraints of the Paris Agreement…

New Study Finds Sea Level Rise Accelerating; NASA (02-13-2018)
Global sea level rise is accelerating incrementally over time rather than increasing at a steady rate, as previously thought, according to a new study based on 25 years of NASA and European satellite data…

Federal report: High-tide flooding could happen ‘every other day’ by late this century; The Washington Post (03-28-2018)

Surrendering to rising seas; Scientific American (08-2018)
Coastal communities struggling to adapt to climate change are beginning to do what was once unthinkable: retreat…