Tag Archives: Pollution

Prozac in ocean water a possible threat to sea life

bernard-l'ermite
Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

Oregon shore crabs exhibit risky behavior when they’re exposed to the antidepressant Prozac, making it easier for predators to catch them, according to a new study from Portland State University (PSU)…

Read Full Article; Science Daily (10-20-2017)

California’s Crab Fiasco Is Worse for Marine Life Than Humans; Wired (11-06-2015)

Microplastics Worse For Crabs And Other Marine Life Than Previously Thought; Science Daily (07-18-2014)

The Book: “All The Way To The Ocean,” by Joel Harper (© 2010)
A book teaching kids and parents that sewage pollution runs “All the Way to the Ocean.”

Ecological roulette”: Sea creatures hitchhike across Pacific on tsunami debris


Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

Nearly 300 species of fish, mussels and other sea critters hitchhiked across the Pacific Ocean on debris from the 2011 Japanese tsunami, washing ashore alive in the United States, researchers reported Thursday.

It is the largest and longest marine migration ever documented, outside experts and the researchers said. The scientists and colleagues combed the beaches of Washington, Oregon, California, British Columbia, Alaska and Hawaii and tracked the species to their Japanese origins…

Read Full Article; CBS News (09-28-2017)

Tsunami carried a million sea creatures from Japan to US west coast; Guardian UK (09-28-2017)
In what experts are calling the longest maritime migration ever recorded, an estimated one million creatures – including crustaceans, sea slugs and sea worms – made the 4,800-mile (7,725km) journey on a flotilla of tsunami debris…

Pacific bluefin tuna transport Fukushima-derived radionuclides from Japan to California; Pnas (05-28-2012)

Higher Levels of Fukushima Cesium Detected Offshore; WHOI (12-05-2015)

“Coming To A Beach Near You,” by Eddie Jarvis (10-04-2012)
One thing is for sure, the costliest natural disaster the world has ever seen isn’t over yet…

International Coastal Cleanup: September 16th, 2017

becah-clean-up2
Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

Join the world’s largest volunteer effort for our ocean by finding an International Coastal Cleanup event location near you.

Nearly 12 million people and counting have been part of the world’s biggest volunteer effort to protect the ocean, with Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup® have picked up everything imaginable along the world’s shorelines.

Today, plastic has been found in 62% of all sea birds and in 100% of sea turtle species.

By participating in the International Coastal Cleanup, you can make a difference. You’ll join millions of volunteers just like you, who love the ocean and want to protect it. This year’s International Coastal Cleanup is Saturday, September 16th, 2017…

Read Full Article: The Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup

Current Results: 2017 Data Release; The Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup
In partnership with volunteer organizations and individuals around the globe, Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup engages people to remove trash from the world’s beaches and waterways, identify the sources of debris and change the behaviors…

Read The Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup 2016 Report, ICC

Ship exhaust makes oceanic thunderstorms more intense

ships
Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

Thunderstorms directly above two of the world’s busiest shipping lanes are significantly more powerful than storms in areas of the ocean where ships don’t travel, according to new research…

Read Full Article, Science Daily (09-07-2017)

“FREIGHTENED – The Real Price of Shipping,” a movie by multi award-winning filmmaker Denis Delestrac-©-2016; (03-31-2016)
90% of the goods we consume in the West are manufactured in far-off lands and brought to us by ship. The cargo shipping industry is a key player in world economy and forms the basis of our very model of modern civilisation; without it, it would be impossible to fulfil the ever-increasing demands of our societies. Yet the functioning and regulations of this business remain largely obscure to many, and its hidden costs affect us all. Due to their size, freight ships no longer fit in traditional city harbours; they have moved out of the public’s eye, behind barriers and check points…

Ship engine emissions adversely affect the health of inhabitants of coastal regions; Science Daily (07-19-2016)
Ship emissions adversely affect the health of inhabitants of coastal regions. This was the main finding of a study on the influence of ship engine emissions on macrophages in the lungs. Since macrophages also play a key role in lung diseases such as COPD, the study is important for understanding the health risks of ship exhausts…

Sea Traffic Pollutes Our Lungs More Than Previously Thought, Science Daily (11-20-2015)
New data show that the air along the coasts is full of hazardous nanoparticles from sea traffic. Almost half of the measured particles stem from sea traffic emissions, while the rest is deemed to be mainly from cars but also industries and natural particles from the sea…

Super-sized ships: How big can they get? Independent (10-21-2014)
Despite the physical limits and risks, ships of more than 450m are anticipated within the next five years…

Worldwide Ship Traffic Up 300 Percent Since 1992, AGU (11-29-2014)
Maritime traffic on the world’s oceans has increased four-fold over the past 20 years, likely causing more water, air and noise pollution on the open seas, according to a new study quantifying global ship traffic…

Shipping Superhighways; NASA (03-06-2015)

Breaking Bad on the Beach, NASA / Earth Observatory (09-28-2014)
Tens of thousands of ships ply the world’s oceans, bays, and rivers. But what happens when those ships have become too old or too expensive to operate? In most cases, they end up on the shores of Asia…literally.

New App enables divers to chart marine litter levels


Photograph: © SAF – Coastal Care

Excerpts;

A new smartphone app is enabling scuba divers across the world to easily record information on the marine litter they encounter under the sea.

Through the data obtained by the smartphone app, underwater protection organisation Project AWARE will build a dataset that will be shared with science and conservation bodies to help drive long-term change and address the global marine litter crisis…

Read Full Article; Resource (08-23-2017)

Project AWARE, Learn More

Plastic Pollution / When The Mermaids Cry: The Great Plastic Tide, Coastal Care ©-2009.
For more than 50 years, global production and consumption of plastics have continued to rise. An estimated 300 million tons of plastics were produced in 2015, confirming and upward trend over the past years, according to a new report by the World Economics Forum, released at Davos in January 2016.
Plastic is versatile, lightweight, flexible, moisture resistant, strong, and relatively inexpensive. Those are the attractive qualities that lead us, around the world, to such a voracious appetite and over-consumption of plastic goods. However, durable and very slow to degrade, plastic materials that are used in the production of so many products all, ultimately, become waste with staying power. Our tremendous attraction to plastic, coupled with an undeniable behavioral propensity of increasingly over-consuming, discarding, littering and thus polluting, has become a combination of lethal nature… — © SAF — Coastal Care

To clean up ocean plastics, increase focus on coasts, Science Daily (01-19-2016)
The most efficient way to clean up ocean plastics and avoid harming ecosystems is to place plastic collectors near coasts, according to a new study…

Loving the Ocean Starts at Home, National Geographic (09-08-2016)

Zeebrugge, Belgium


Astronaut photograph ISS051-E-13055 was acquired on April 13, 2017.

By Justin Wilkinson, Texas State University, JETS Contract at NASA-JSC;

Looking down on the narrow seas between Europe and England, an astronaut took this photograph of the small town of Zeebrugge, one of Europe’s most important modern ports. This Belgian town has just 4,000 inhabitants, but it takes 11,000 people to operate the port, so workers stream in from neighboring coastal towns such as Knokke-Heist, Heist-aan-Zee, and Blankenberge.

Zeebrugge is a town of superlatives. It is the world’s largest port for the import and export of new vehicles, with more than 1.6 million handled in 2010. Zeebrugge is also the site of Europe’s largest liquid natural gas (LNG) terminal, receiving the gas via an undersea pipeline from the North Sea.

The port at Zeebrugge accommodates “ultra-large” container ships, so it is one of the most important European hubs for containerized cargo. The most important function of the port is intense “RoRo traffic” (roll-on roll-off) between cities on the Continent, Great Britain, Scandinavia, and Southern Europe. The port handles more than 2.5 million standard containers (TEUs) and 50 million tonnes of cargo each year.

Being close to the United Kingdom, the coastal town also functions as a passenger ferry terminal. It attracts tourists to its cruise ships as well as its beaches, which are well developed north of the harbor in Albertstrand. Zeebrugge is also Belgium’s most important fishing port, and its wholesale fish market is one of the largest in Europe.

Hundreds of years ago, an arm of the sea extended well inland as far as the village of Damme, which acted as a port for centuries. When this inlet silted up, Zeebrugge became the port for the famous historical inland city of Bruges (just outside the lower right of the photo) with which it is still connected by a straight canal. Zeebrugge means Bruges by the sea.

Original Article; NASA / Earth Observatory (08-21-2017)

Deep-Sea Ports Construction Cause Coastal Erosion, Bangkok Post (01-12-2012)
Destructive coastal erosion along southern shorelines battered by recent storms could be the result of deep-sea port construction, villagers say, leaving them in fear of more beaches disappearing…

African Ports Scramble for Land to Expand as Demand Rises; JOC (07-28-2015)

Experts All Set For In-Depth Study Of Beach Erosion, Times Of India (02-17-2014)
A team of oceanography experts has submitted a report on the preliminary causes identified for the ongoing coastal erosion affecting the Port’s region on the AP littoral. Two main reasons have been identified…

The Prevention and Control of Shipping and Port Emissions in China, NRDC; (10-28-2014)
China is home to seven of the world’s ten busiest container ports. About 26 percent of the world’s containers pass through the top ten Chinese ports every year. Every ship and truck brings pollution along with its cargo, and China is paying a high price for pollution from shipping. A NRDC new report…

Worldwide Ship Traffic Up 300 Percent Since 1992, AGU (11-29-2014)

Thousands Of Containers Fall Off Ships Every Year. What Happens To Them? Huffington Green (07-17-2014)
It is estimated that thousands of containers are lost every year along international shipping routes due to big waves or wind gusts. Sometimes they wash up on shore, but what happens to the containers that land at the bottom of the sea? No one really knew.

Sea Traffic Pollutes Our Lungs More Than Previously Thought, Science Daily (11-20-2015)
New data show that the air along the coasts is full of hazardous nanoparticles from sea traffic. Almost half of the measured particles stem from sea traffic emissions, while the rest is deemed to be mainly from cars but also industries and natural particles from the sea…

Study: Why Blue Whales Can’t Avoid Barges, Ocean Liners, Huffington Green (05-06-2015)

Super-sized ships: How big can they get? Independent UK (10-20-2014)
Despite the physical limits and risks, ships of more than 450m are anticipated within the next five years…

Shipping Superhighways; NASA (04-06-2015)
The oceans may be vast, yet they still can grow crowded. Some congested areas have enough ship traffic that the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and other groups maintain traffic separation schemes—the equivalent of highways for ships—to reduce the risk of collisions…

“FREIGHTENED – The Real Price of Shipping,” a movie by multi award-winning filmmaker Denis Delestrac-©-2016; (03-31-2016)
90% of the goods we consume in the West are manufactured in far-off lands and brought to us by ship. The cargo shipping industry is a key player in world economy and forms the basis of our very model of modern civilisation; without it, it would be impossible to fulfil the ever-increasing demands of our societies. Yet the functioning and regulations of this business remain largely obscure to many, and its hidden costs affect us all. Due to their size, freight ships no longer fit in traditional city harbours; they have moved out of the public’s eye, behind barriers and check points…

Breaking Bad on the Beach, NASA / Earth Observatory (09-28-2014)
Tens of thousands of ships ply the world’s oceans, bays, and rivers. But what happens when those ships have become too old or too expensive to operate? In most cases, they end up on the shores of Asia…literally.

Beirut’s beaches blighted by the rubbish crisis

lebanon-beach-pollution
Beach pollution, Lebanon. Photo source: ©© Julie Davidson

Excerpts;

Lebanon’s coastline is changing dramatically, with new planned landfill sites that will extend hundreds of metres into the Mediterranean that, amazingly, seem to bother few politicians…

When Lebanon shut its largest rubbish dump in 2015, piles of refuse flooded the streets and public anger soon turned into mass protests against the government. The eventual solution, introduced last year, was to open two seaside dumps on the edge of Beirut.

Activists and waste management experts railed against the plan, warning that refuse and toxic materials could find their way into the sea and pose a significant health threat to people and marine life.

Those fears, although still relevant, were overshadowed by videos on social media showing lorries dumping waste from a decades-old landfill into the sea last month, and the admission by the environment minister that this was happening…

Read Full Article; Beirut’s beaches blighted by the rubbish crisis; The National (07-29-2017)

Lebanon ploughs the Mediterranean; Gulf News (07-21-2017)
Lebanon’s coastline is changing dramatically, with new planned landfill sites that will extend hundreds of metres into the Mediterranean that, amazingly, seem to bother few politicians. Many are persuaded that waste is inert though that is hardly the case with significant environmental damage that will leave an impact on future generations…

Lebanon dumps trash ‘100 times more toxic than raw sewage’ into the sea; StepFeed (06-20-2017)
Tons and tons of toxic waste is being dumped into the Mediterranean off the coast of Lebanon, according to environmental activists.This waste is “100 times more toxic than raw sewage,” Paul Abi Rached from the NGO Terre Liban said, according to The National. In the wake of Lebanon’s ongoing trash-crisis, which began in the summer of 2015, at least two million tons of toxic waste has been dumped into the Mediterranean, threatening to contaminate and eradicate sea life along the coast…

The lucrative history of Lebanese land reclamation; The Daily Star (07-19-2017)

A City Without a Shore: Rem Koolhaas, Dalieh and the Paving of Beirut’s Coast; (03-17-2015)
A development frenzy has wiped out the natural coastline of Lebanon, replacing it with concreted marinas and upscale resorts that are off-limits to the public. Now developers have their eye on the last bit of Beirut waterfront…

Lebanese shun pricey, polluted beaches for trips abroad; CTV News (09-28-2016)
In a country like Lebannon, stretching along the Mediterranean, finding a beach to relax in the summer, should not be a problem. But as private developers have gobbled up seafront land, and families complain of ever-more polluted waters, many Lebanese say it is cheaper and cleaner to fly abroad than go to the beach at home…

Lebanon: capital’s last public sand beach under threat? BBC News (11-26-2016)

Dramatic changes needed in farming practices to keep pace with climate change

algues vertes plages
Green algae invasion, Brittany, France. Excess levels of nitrates from agricultural sources can damage freshwaters and the marine environment by promoting excessive growth of algae that chokes other life, a process known as eutrophication.Photo source: ©© Cristina Barroca

Excerpts;

Researchers investigating nutrients in runoff from agricultural land warn that phosphorus losses will increase, due to climate change, unless this is mitigated by making major changes to agricultural practices…

Read Full Article; Science Daily (08-03-2017)

Meat industry blamed for largest-ever ‘dead zone’ in Gulf of Mexico; Guardian UK (08-01-2017)