Cuba: Sea levels to rise more than 30 in. by 2100

Posted In News, Sand Mining, Sea Level Rise
Jun
17

cuba sea level rise
“Train to Atlantis”. Santa Lucia Beach, Camagüey province, Cuba. Photo by: ©© Innoxiuss

Excerpts;

Cuban scientists calculate that median sea levels around the Caribbean nation will rise more than 30 inches (75 centimeters) by the end of the century due to global climate change…

“Right now it is urgent to preserve mangroves, coral reefs, sea grass and sand beaches. Each of these ecosystems is a natural barrier to defend the coasts from the impact of climate change. If they deteriorate, the consequences will be worse.”Government scientist Marcelino Hernandez warned…

Read Full Article, AP / Huffington Post

Cuban coastline:Retreat up to 2.5 meters, The Watchers
Most of the 400 beaches of Cuba’s territory are affected by erosion with a receding coastline estimated at 1.2 meters per year, according to a study by the Institute of Oceanology of the island. The research ratified “the widespread nature of the Cuban beach erosion” due to phenomena such as sea level rise, sand mining, construction of buildings on natural dunes and incorrectlocation of piers…

Related Posts

Tags: , ,

Post comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Sand Mining

You can make a difference and help save our beaches

Learn simple things that you can do to help protect beaches starting with simply educating others about the beach thereby helping us celebrate the beauty of the world’s beaches.


Join our campaign!

Sign the petition to end global sand mining.


  • Sand Mining Resources

  • More / Sand Mining

    India’s ‘New Cities’ Plan: Environment Not Included

    sand-mining-coastal-care

    March 6th, 2015

    Sand – inexpensive and abundant – is a treasure to India’s builders and the construction industry, which employs some 40 million people. But the spike in construction means sand mining, both legal and illegal, will increase in coastal areas, riverbeds, creeks, and rivulets.

    Read More

    Sand Mining Threatens South Africa’s Coast

    durban-south-africa

    March 6th, 2015

    The time has come for the government to consider a total ban on any sand mining in South African rivers to curb serious environmental damage and the growing risk of severe erosion damage to coastal cities like Durban.

    Read More

    Sand Dredging Threatening Tourism at Top-Rated Kenya Beach

    sand-mined-shores

    February 23rd, 2015

    Unless measures are taken to halt dredging along the south coast beaches once and for all, one of Kenya’s greatest tourism resources could be damaged beyond repair and turn from a crowd puller and award winner in the space of a few months into a marine desert landscape.

    Read More

    Liberia: Coastal Defense Paradox – Beach Sand Mining Persists

    sand-mining-coastal-care

    February 8th, 2015

    Despite claims by the government of Liberia that it is committed to a coastal defense plan in order to save the city of Buchanan from sea erosion, beach sand mining in Central and Upper Buchanan continues on a weekly basis.

    Read More

    Kenya: Leave the sand on Diani Beach

    diani-beach

    January 27th, 2015

    Tourism stakeholders in Kenya and local residents of Diani Beach south of Mombasa are up in arms over plans to extract some 5 million tons of sand from award-winning Diani tourist beach.

    Read More

    Coastal Sand Mining: Govts. Asked to Respond; India

    sand-miner-mumbai

    January 27th, 2015

    The Madras High Court has directed the Centre and the Tamil Nadu government to respond to a public interest litigation petition seeking a SIT probe into illegal beach sand mining in the State.

    Read More

    Illegal Sand Mining in South Africa, a Report

    sand-mining-south-africa-denis-delestrac

    December 28th, 2014

    Natural sand from estuary and coastal land is one of South Africa’s most valuable resources. However, there has recently been a drastic increase in uncontrolled and unauthorised sand mining activities in rivers, valleys and estuaries throughout the country.

    Read More

    Why Sand Is Disappearing ; By John R. Gillis

    beach-sand-mining

    December 4th, 2014

    To those of us who visit beaches only in summer, they seem as permanent a part of our natural heritage as the Rocky Mountains and the Great Lakes. But shore dwellers know differently. Beaches are the most transitory of landscapes, and sand beaches the most vulnerable of all.

    Read More

    Archive / Sand Mining