Mangrove & Coral Destruction

Miles of mangrove trees Miles of mangrove trees have died in recent years along the coast of Angola due to a combination of environmental factors, including oil spills. Photo: Joe Hughes

Widespread destruction of mangroves (Bahamas, Australia) and Coral Reefs (Caribbean, Red Sea) has resulted in the loss of some of the worlds most diverse ecosystems. As a side effect, this has greatly increased shoreline hazards and beach erosion rates. The greatest benefit of mangroves is their ability to reduce storm surge. This benefit is long-term and requires no maintenance. The 1999 super typhoon, Orissa, killed over 10,000 people in India drowning many with its powerful storm surge. This number could have been lower if the mangroves had been retained. Mangroves are lost because of clearing for development, logging, and shrimp farming. Coral reefs are lost by mining (Bali, Indonesia), sedimentation from agriculture on the upland (St. Croix, Virgin Islands), bad fishing techniques that kill corals (Pacific Islands), sedimentation from nourished beaches (Waikiki) and a host of other natural and global warming-related causes. Dubai is perhaps the single greatest example of coral reef destruction. The artificial islands built there buried vast coral reefs. Mangroves and coral reefs often provide protection for nearby beaches. Their destruction harms the beach as well.


Surfing in / Mangrove and Coral Destruction

Thirsty mangroves cause unprecedented dieback; Australia’s northern coast

Scientists have discovered why, in early 2016, there was an unprecedented dieback of 7400 hectares of mangroves, which stretched for 1000 kilometres along the Gulf of Carpentaria – the plants died of thirst.

Comments Off on Thirsty mangroves cause unprecedented dieback; Australia’s northern coast

Corals Die as Global Warming Collides with Local Weather in the South China Sea

In the South China Sea, a 2°C rise in the sea surface temperature in June 2015 was amplified to produce a 6°C rise on Dongsha Atoll, a shallow coral reef ecosystem, killing approximately 40 percent of the resident coral community according to a study published in Scientific Reports this week.

Comments Off on Corals Die as Global Warming Collides with Local Weather in the South China Sea

Dead zones may threaten coral reefs worldwide

Dead zones affect dozens of coral reefs around the world and threaten hundreds more according to a new study. Watching a massive coral reef die-off on the Caribbean coast of Panama, they suspected it was caused by a dead zone – a low-oxygen area that snuffs out marine life – rather than by ocean warming or acidification.

Comments Off on Dead zones may threaten coral reefs worldwide

Ship crashes into ‘pristine’ coral reef, captain may be charged

The captain of a cruise ship could be charged after his boat rammed into a pristine coral reef. The 297-foot (90.6 meter) MS Caledonian Sky crashed into the reefs at Raja Ampat on March 4. Raja Ampat is frequently included on lists of the the world’s most beautiful coral reefs and is often described as an “untouched” beach paradise.

Comments Off on Ship crashes into ‘pristine’ coral reef, captain may be charged

War on global warming only way to save world’s coral, study says

Reducing pollution and curbing overfishing won’t prevent the severe bleaching that is killing coral at catastrophic rates, according to a study of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. In the end, researchers say, the only way to save the world’s coral from heat-induced bleaching is with a war on global warming.

Comments Off on War on global warming only way to save world’s coral, study says

Greenpeace images show Great Barrier Reef suffering coral bleaching for second year in a row

Greenpeace Australia Pacific today releases shocking photos and footage documenting the Great Barrier Reef’s first severe coral bleaching to happen two years in a row. The bleaching is the result of 12 months of above-average sea temperatures, which is “cooking the reef alive”.

Comments Off on Greenpeace images show Great Barrier Reef suffering coral bleaching for second year in a row

50 Reefs Initiative Is Good News For Coral Reefs

Coral reefs are in crisis. The facts are clear: without a different approach to conservation, coral reefs will continue to decline toward extinction. However, an announcement last week in Bali, Indonesia gave us some new reasons to be hopeful.

Comments Off on 50 Reefs Initiative Is Good News For Coral Reefs

Red Sea Mangroves Fight Back in the Face of Global Decline

The Red Sea is one of the world’s saltiest and warmest seas. It is an extremely harsh environment surrounded by desert and subject to very high temperatures. However, there has been no decline in mangrove stands in the Red Sea, where the extreme conditions seem to mean that the mangroves of the Red Sea have been subjected to much lower levels of human activity than elsewhere.

Comments Off on Red Sea Mangroves Fight Back in the Face of Global Decline

Cost-effective solutions to sediment runoff and other land-based pollution affecting West Maui reefs

Land-based pollutants have been linked to the degradation of several Hawaiian reefs. Between 2000 and 2015, coral cover on West Maui’s northern reefs has dramatically declined from 30 percent to 10 percent.

Comments Off on Cost-effective solutions to sediment runoff and other land-based pollution affecting West Maui reefs


Recent / Mangrove and Coral Destruction

Corals Die as Global Warming Collides with Local Weather in the South China Sea

March 27th, 2017

In the South China Sea, a 2°C rise in the sea surface temperature in June 2015 was amplified to produce a 6°C rise on Dongsha Atoll, a shallow coral reef ecosystem, killing approximately 40 percent of the resident coral community according to a study published in Scientific Reports this week.

Read More

Dead zones may threaten coral reefs worldwide

March 23rd, 2017

Dead zones affect dozens of coral reefs around the world and threaten hundreds more according to a new study. Watching a massive coral reef die-off on the Caribbean coast of Panama, they suspected it was caused by a dead zone – a low-oxygen area that snuffs out marine life – rather than by ocean warming or acidification.

Read More

Ship crashes into ‘pristine’ coral reef, captain may be charged

March 16th, 2017

The captain of a cruise ship could be charged after his boat rammed into a pristine coral reef. The 297-foot (90.6 meter) MS Caledonian Sky crashed into the reefs at Raja Ampat on March 4. Raja Ampat is frequently included on lists of the the world’s most beautiful coral reefs and is often described as an “untouched” beach paradise.

Read More

War on global warming only way to save world’s coral, study says

March 16th, 2017

Reducing pollution and curbing overfishing won’t prevent the severe bleaching that is killing coral at catastrophic rates, according to a study of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. In the end, researchers say, the only way to save the world’s coral from heat-induced bleaching is with a war on global warming.

Read More

Greenpeace images show Great Barrier Reef suffering coral bleaching for second year in a row

March 10th, 2017

Greenpeace Australia Pacific today releases shocking photos and footage documenting the Great Barrier Reef’s first severe coral bleaching to happen two years in a row. The bleaching is the result of 12 months of above-average sea temperatures, which is “cooking the reef alive”.

Read More

50 Reefs Initiative Is Good News For Coral Reefs

March 9th, 2017

Coral reefs are in crisis. The facts are clear: without a different approach to conservation, coral reefs will continue to decline toward extinction. However, an announcement last week in Bali, Indonesia gave us some new reasons to be hopeful.

Read More

Red Sea Mangroves Fight Back in the Face of Global Decline

March 6th, 2017

The Red Sea is one of the world’s saltiest and warmest seas. It is an extremely harsh environment surrounded by desert and subject to very high temperatures. However, there has been no decline in mangrove stands in the Red Sea, where the extreme conditions seem to mean that the mangroves of the Red Sea have been subjected to much lower levels of human activity than elsewhere.

Read More

Cost-effective solutions to sediment runoff and other land-based pollution affecting West Maui reefs

March 3rd, 2017

Land-based pollutants have been linked to the degradation of several Hawaiian reefs. Between 2000 and 2015, coral cover on West Maui’s northern reefs has dramatically declined from 30 percent to 10 percent.

Read More

Where the land meets the sea: Governing mangrove forests

February 9th, 2017

As countries ponder how to encourage mangrove conservation, the role of people, rights, and governance institutions should receive equal consideration.

Read More

The Human Element of Mangrove Management

February 4th, 2017

As global climate change continues to threaten coastal communities in the tropics, discussions around mangrove forest conservation and rehabilitation have been focused primarily on ecological conditions, lacking a more robust analysis about the ways land governance, resource rights arrangements, and land use planning — the social aspects of the conservation challenge — affect mangrove conservation and rehabilitation…

Read More