Crabs and shrimp are flocking to the Deepwater Horizon spill site to mate, and it’s making them sick Christina Zdanowicz-Profile-Image

Crabs and shrimp are flocking to the Deepwater Horizon spill site to mate, and it’s making them sick Christina Zdanowicz-Profile-Image


Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care
Excerpts;

The site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill has become a popular mating ground for deep-sea crabs and shrimp.

Decomposing oil from the 2010 spill could be mimicking a sex hormone, and that’s what’s attracting these crustaceans to get frisky in this part of the Gulf, according to an August study published in the journal Royal Society Open Science…

Read Full Article; CNN (09-10-2019)

Continuing impacts of Deepwater Horizon oil spill; Science Daily (04-19-2019)
Nine years ago tomorrow, April 20, 2010, crude oil began leaking from the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig into the Gulf of Mexico in what turned out to be the largest marine oil spill in history. A long-term study suggests the oil is still affecting the salt marshes of the Gulf Coast…

Coastal Care

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