Inform

The health, beauty and ecosystem of our beaches is under threat

The driving cause for most of these problems is overdevelopment and poor coastal management. If no buildings crowded the shoreline, there would be no shoreline armoring, beach nourishment, threats to the beach fauna and flora or shoreline erosion problems.

Coastal Care Introduction

“Beach sand: so common, so complex, so perfect for sandcastles; and now it is a precious and vanishing resource.”

—Orrin H. Pilkey

Beaches are the most visited natural attraction on the planet. The coast attracts millions of vacationing people each year. People love the sand, the surf, the sea breeze, and the vacation ambiance so much that many come to the beach to stay. There is a magical feeling living near the ocean, but human migration towards the coast comes with a high environmental price tag.

A majority of the world’s population lives within 50 km of the coast and the projections are 75% by the year 2025. This strip of land represents only 3% of the total land mass of the planet. In this context, it is easier to understand the environmental impact. Over 70% of the earth is covered by water and with so many people living on the coast, we are polluting a major source of food, the oceans.

A beautiful undeveloped beach in Indonesia.

A beautiful undeveloped beach in Indonesia.

The loss of life and economic impacts of major storms – cyclones, typhoons, and hurricanes – and tsunamis would be reduced drastically if beaches were not developed. Unfortunately, recent examples of the problem are numerous: 1999 Indian cyclone Orissa (over 10,000 dead and $5 billion in damage), 2004 Indian Ocean tsumani (over 250,000 dead), 2005 Hurricane Katrina (over 1,800 killed and $80 billion in damage), and 2008 Hurricane Ike (over 30 killed and $30 billion in damage).

Today, the health, beauty, and ecosystem function of the world’s beaches are under threat and the driving causes for most of these problems are over-development and poor coastal management. If no buildings crowded the shoreline there would be no shoreline armoring, beach nourishment, threats to the beach fauna and flora or shoreline erosion problems.

It is important to distinguish between erosion and erosion problems. Erosion refers to the landward retreat of the shoreline. Most of the world’s shorelines are eroding, a very few are building out (accreting). There is no erosion problem, however, until someone builds something next to a shoreline. All over the world in remote areas, shorelines are slowly retreating and no one cares. In a global sense, our continents are slowly shrinking, and in a very real sense, erosion problems are man made. On a high-rise, condo-lined shoreline like those in Spain and the Florida coast, erosion is a huge problem and will only worsen in the future as sea level rise accelerates. Sea level rise will accelerate erosion of the shoreline and have a dramatic impact on our infrastructures, our economies, and our way of life.

Sea level rise is one of the most important causes of global shoreline erosion. If the coastline is developed, shoreline armoring is often used in an effort to save the buildings from the eroding shoreline. Once this begins, the beaches will degrade and eventually be lost. In the long-term, however, these armoring efforts are in vain. The ocean will continue to rise as the rate of sea level rise is expected to increase as the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets continue to degrade. The situation is made worse now because beach houses and condominiums are being built closer to the ocean than they were 25 years ago. Many of us are familiar with images of large beach houses about to fall victim to the oceans simply from daily erosion accelerated by the ever rising sea.

The work of the Santa Aguila Foundation will emphasize the impacts of sand mining and shoreline armoring: the first because the effects of sand mining have been largely ignored on a global scale and the latter due to its overwhelming negative impacts on the world’s beaches.


Surfing in / Inform

Coastal Sand is Being Depleted, and It’s Taking Our Beaches With It

beach-sand-mining
News, Sand Mining
Sep
24

While conservationists champion the reduction of the world’s resources, one important material right at our toes has gone largely unnoticed. Coastal sands are being heavily mined, diminishing the world’s beaches.

Comments Off on Coastal Sand is Being Depleted, and It’s Taking Our Beaches With It

Not all bioplastics are created equal

plastic-pollution-bottles
News, Pollution
Sep
23

Conventional plastics are seen as environmentally unfriendly because they’re made from fossil fuels. However, as plastic production grows, plant-derived polyethylene terephthalate (BioPET) has been touted as a more environmentally friendly alternative to PET, a plastic primarily used in beverage bottles. But a new study suggests that’s not always the case.

Comments Off on Not all bioplastics are created equal

Underwater Mediterranean algae forests, threatened by human activity impact

barcelona

C. zosteroides, a brown alga of the order Fucale, is a species that creates dense underwater forests that create habitat, protection and food for the marine organisms. It is also one of the most sensitive algae species, under the environmental and anthropogenic impacts in the Mediterranean.

Comments Off on Underwater Mediterranean algae forests, threatened by human activity impact

Can killer robots save ocean ecosystems?

lionfish-close-up

Few predators can match the devastating impact of the lion fish. Since arriving in US waters in the 1980s, these fearsome creatures have left a trail of destruction along the Atlantic Coast, from Rhode Island to Venezuela. Lionfish can reduce a flourishing coral reef to barren wasteland in a matter of weeks.

Comments Off on Can killer robots save ocean ecosystems?

France Becomes First Country To Ban Plastic Cups And Dishes

plastic-pollution-coastalcare
News, Pollution
Sep
21

According to The Associated Press, France has become the first country in the world to ban disposable, plastic cups and dishes. Businesses have been given until Jan. 1, 2020 to comply with the measure.

Comments Off on France Becomes First Country To Ban Plastic Cups And Dishes

The Conservation Crisis No One Is Talking About

illegal-sand-mining-coastal-care

Beaches around the world are disappearing. No, the cause isn’t sea-level rise, at least not this time. It’s a little-known but enormous industry called sand mining, which every year sucks up billions of tons of sand from beaches, ocean floors, and rivers to make everything from concrete to microchips to toothpaste.

Comments Off on The Conservation Crisis No One Is Talking About

Indonesia to resume work on giant seawall

jakarta-flood

Greater Jakarta, one of the world’s most densely populated cities, sits on a swampy plain and is sinking at a faster rate than any other city in the world.

Comments Off on Indonesia to resume work on giant seawall

Pacific Ocean’s hidden wonders revealed on dive to underwater volcano

blue-sun-coral-max

Scientists believe they have identified a new species of coral and found a rare Dumbo octopus during an expedition 3,000ft (900m) down in the Pacific Ocean.

Comments Off on Pacific Ocean’s hidden wonders revealed on dive to underwater volcano

When Coastal cleanups become a habit

beach-clean-up
News, Pollution
Sep
17

Coastal Cleanups, which draw volunteers to help clean up coastline, rivers and streams, have helped educate people on the importance of keeping the waterways free of trash and debris. “Every day should be a day when we can make a difference.” “We pick up trash if we see it on a wildlife area or on a beach… “

Comments Off on When Coastal cleanups become a habit

Recent / Inform

Coastal Sand is Being Depleted, and It’s Taking Our Beaches With It

beach-sand-mining

September 24th, 2016

While conservationists champion the reduction of the world’s resources, one important material right at our toes has gone largely unnoticed. Coastal sands are being heavily mined, diminishing the world’s beaches.

Read More

Not all bioplastics are created equal

plastic-pollution-bottles

September 23rd, 2016

Conventional plastics are seen as environmentally unfriendly because they’re made from fossil fuels. However, as plastic production grows, plant-derived polyethylene terephthalate (BioPET) has been touted as a more environmentally friendly alternative to PET, a plastic primarily used in beverage bottles. But a new study suggests that’s not always the case.

Read More

Underwater Mediterranean algae forests, threatened by human activity impact

barcelona

September 23rd, 2016

C. zosteroides, a brown alga of the order Fucale, is a species that creates dense underwater forests that create habitat, protection and food for the marine organisms. It is also one of the most sensitive algae species, under the environmental and anthropogenic impacts in the Mediterranean.

Read More

Can killer robots save ocean ecosystems?

lionfish-close-up

September 22nd, 2016

Few predators can match the devastating impact of the lion fish. Since arriving in US waters in the 1980s, these fearsome creatures have left a trail of destruction along the Atlantic Coast, from Rhode Island to Venezuela. Lionfish can reduce a flourishing coral reef to barren wasteland in a matter of weeks.

Read More

France Becomes First Country To Ban Plastic Cups And Dishes

plastic-pollution-coastalcare

September 21st, 2016

According to The Associated Press, France has become the first country in the world to ban disposable, plastic cups and dishes. Businesses have been given until Jan. 1, 2020 to comply with the measure.

Read More

The Conservation Crisis No One Is Talking About

illegal-sand-mining-coastal-care

September 21st, 2016

Beaches around the world are disappearing. No, the cause isn’t sea-level rise, at least not this time. It’s a little-known but enormous industry called sand mining, which every year sucks up billions of tons of sand from beaches, ocean floors, and rivers to make everything from concrete to microchips to toothpaste.

Read More

Indonesia to resume work on giant seawall

jakarta-flood

September 19th, 2016

Greater Jakarta, one of the world’s most densely populated cities, sits on a swampy plain and is sinking at a faster rate than any other city in the world.

Read More

Pacific Ocean’s hidden wonders revealed on dive to underwater volcano

blue-sun-coral-max

September 18th, 2016

Scientists believe they have identified a new species of coral and found a rare Dumbo octopus during an expedition 3,000ft (900m) down in the Pacific Ocean.

Read More

When Coastal cleanups become a habit

beach-clean-up

September 17th, 2016

Coastal Cleanups, which draw volunteers to help clean up coastline, rivers and streams, have helped educate people on the importance of keeping the waterways free of trash and debris. “Every day should be a day when we can make a difference.” “We pick up trash if we see it on a wildlife area or on a beach… “

Read More

‘Ghost Forests’ Appear As Rising Seas Kill Trees

bull-island

September 16th, 2016

Bare trunks of dead coastal forests are being discovered up and down the mid-Atlantic coastline, killed by the advance of rising seas. The “ghost forests,” as scientists call them, offer eerie evidence of some of the world’s fastest rates of sea level rise.

Read More


Coastal Care junior
The World's Beaches
Sand Mining
One Percent