Inform

The health, beauty and ecosystem of our beaches is under threat

The driving cause for most of these problems is overdevelopment and poor coastal management. If no buildings crowded the shoreline, there would be no shoreline armoring, beach nourishment, threats to the beach fauna and flora or shoreline erosion problems.

Coastal Care Introduction

“Beach sand: so common, so complex, so perfect for sandcastles; and now it is a precious and vanishing resource.”

—Orrin H. Pilkey

Beaches are the most visited natural attraction on the planet. The coast attracts millions of vacationing people each year. People love the sand, the surf, the sea breeze, and the vacation ambiance so much that many come to the beach to stay. There is a magical feeling living near the ocean, but human migration towards the coast comes with a high environmental price tag.

A majority of the world’s population lives within 50 km of the coast and the projections are 75% by the year 2025. This strip of land represents only 3% of the total land mass of the planet. In this context, it is easier to understand the environmental impact. Over 70% of the earth is covered by water and with so many people living on the coast, we are polluting a major source of food, the oceans.

A beautiful undeveloped beach in Indonesia.

A beautiful undeveloped beach in Indonesia.

The loss of life and economic impacts of major storms – cyclones, typhoons, and hurricanes – and tsunamis would be reduced drastically if beaches were not developed. Unfortunately, recent examples of the problem are numerous: 1999 Indian cyclone Orissa (over 10,000 dead and $5 billion in damage), 2004 Indian Ocean tsumani (over 250,000 dead), 2005 Hurricane Katrina (over 1,800 killed and $80 billion in damage), and 2008 Hurricane Ike (over 30 killed and $30 billion in damage).

Today, the health, beauty, and ecosystem function of the world’s beaches are under threat and the driving causes for most of these problems are over-development and poor coastal management. If no buildings crowded the shoreline there would be no shoreline armoring, beach nourishment, threats to the beach fauna and flora or shoreline erosion problems.

It is important to distinguish between erosion and erosion problems. Erosion refers to the landward retreat of the shoreline. Most of the world’s shorelines are eroding, a very few are building out (accreting). There is no erosion problem, however, until someone builds something next to a shoreline. All over the world in remote areas, shorelines are slowly retreating and no one cares. In a global sense, our continents are slowly shrinking, and in a very real sense, erosion problems are man made. On a high-rise, condo-lined shoreline like those in Spain and the Florida coast, erosion is a huge problem and will only worsen in the future as sea level rise accelerates. Sea level rise will accelerate erosion of the shoreline and have a dramatic impact on our infrastructures, our economies, and our way of life.

Sea level rise is one of the most important causes of global shoreline erosion. If the coastline is developed, shoreline armoring is often used in an effort to save the buildings from the eroding shoreline. Once this begins, the beaches will degrade and eventually be lost. In the long-term, however, these armoring efforts are in vain. The ocean will continue to rise as the rate of sea level rise is expected to increase as the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets continue to degrade. The situation is made worse now because beach houses and condominiums are being built closer to the ocean than they were 25 years ago. Many of us are familiar with images of large beach houses about to fall victim to the oceans simply from daily erosion accelerated by the ever rising sea.

The work of the Santa Aguila Foundation will emphasize the impacts of sand mining and shoreline armoring: the first because the effects of sand mining have been largely ignored on a global scale and the latter due to its overwhelming negative impacts on the world’s beaches.


Surfing in / Inform

Bird chick clip on BBC One’s Drowning in Plastic documentary leaved viewers in tears

Inform, Pollution
May
23

However hard this is to watch, we must face up to it.

Comments Off on Bird chick clip on BBC One’s Drowning in Plastic documentary leaved viewers in tears

Against the grain: anger grows at spike in ‘sand graffiti’ by tourists in Japan

Local authorities in Japan have drawn a line in the sand amid anger over a rise in graffiti by foreign tourists disfiguring its pristine coastal dunes.

Comments Off on Against the grain: anger grows at spike in ‘sand graffiti’ by tourists in Japan

Most parents want kids to learn about climate change, but most schools don’t teach it

A new study paints a glaring divide between what parents want their kids to learn in school and what’s actually being taught. According to a new poll conducted by NPR and Ipsos, more than 80 percent of parents are in favor of teaching of climate change in school.

Comments Off on Most parents want kids to learn about climate change, but most schools don’t teach it

Beach cleanups are missing millions of pieces of plastic

News, Pollution
May
19

In the last decade, beach cleanups have grown into a global phenomenon, with volunteers gathering at regular intervals for the Sisyphean task of cleaning up plastic trash. Now, a new research suggests that beach cleanups can inadvertently mask the full scale of plastic pollution, much of which lies below the sand’s surface.

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Glint of the Irrawaddy Delta

Inform
May
19

The Irrawaddy is the largest river in Burma (Myanmar) and the country’s most important transportation artery.

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Dozens of gray whales are dying on the West Coast. What’s killing them?

At least 53 dead or dying gray whales have washed up on West Coast beaches this spring, a death rate that’s only been seen once before. The great mammals are starving to death and scientists have theories as to why but so far no full explanation. The number of deaths is likely much higher because it’s estimated that only 10% of dead whales actually end up on shore.

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Predicting Wave Wash Overs for Sea Turtle Nests

To better protect coastal species, researchers developed a model that predicts harmful wash overs with 83% accuracy.

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Explorer says record-breaking deep dive “opening the door for science”

News, Pollution
May
14

An American diver set a new record for the deepest dive in history last month when he plunged nearly 36,000 feet. Though he was the first to make it to those depths, man’s impact is already present there with plastic scattered among the sea creatures.

Comments Off on Explorer says record-breaking deep dive “opening the door for science”

New data platform illuminates history of humans’ environmental impact

Animal remains found at archaeological sites tell the millennia-long story of how humans have hunted, domesticated and transported wildlife, altered landscapes and responded to environmental changes such as shifting temperatures and sea levels.Now, that story is available digitally through a new open-access data platform which links records of animals across biological and archaeological databases

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Recent / Inform

Bird chick clip on BBC One’s Drowning in Plastic documentary leaved viewers in tears

May 23rd, 2019

However hard this is to watch, we must face up to it.

Read More

Against the grain: anger grows at spike in ‘sand graffiti’ by tourists in Japan

May 20th, 2019

Local authorities in Japan have drawn a line in the sand amid anger over a rise in graffiti by foreign tourists disfiguring its pristine coastal dunes.

Read More

Most parents want kids to learn about climate change, but most schools don’t teach it

May 19th, 2019

A new study paints a glaring divide between what parents want their kids to learn in school and what’s actually being taught. According to a new poll conducted by NPR and Ipsos, more than 80 percent of parents are in favor of teaching of climate change in school.

Read More

Beach cleanups are missing millions of pieces of plastic

May 19th, 2019

In the last decade, beach cleanups have grown into a global phenomenon, with volunteers gathering at regular intervals for the Sisyphean task of cleaning up plastic trash. Now, a new research suggests that beach cleanups can inadvertently mask the full scale of plastic pollution, much of which lies below the sand’s surface.

Read More

Glint of the Irrawaddy Delta

May 19th, 2019

The Irrawaddy is the largest river in Burma (Myanmar) and the country’s most important transportation artery.

Read More

Dozens of gray whales are dying on the West Coast. What’s killing them?

May 18th, 2019

At least 53 dead or dying gray whales have washed up on West Coast beaches this spring, a death rate that’s only been seen once before. The great mammals are starving to death and scientists have theories as to why but so far no full explanation. The number of deaths is likely much higher because it’s estimated that only 10% of dead whales actually end up on shore.

Read More

Predicting Wave Wash Overs for Sea Turtle Nests

May 16th, 2019

To better protect coastal species, researchers developed a model that predicts harmful wash overs with 83% accuracy.

Read More

Explorer says record-breaking deep dive “opening the door for science”

May 14th, 2019

An American diver set a new record for the deepest dive in history last month when he plunged nearly 36,000 feet. Though he was the first to make it to those depths, man’s impact is already present there with plastic scattered among the sea creatures.

Read More

New data platform illuminates history of humans’ environmental impact

May 13th, 2019

Animal remains found at archaeological sites tell the millennia-long story of how humans have hunted, domesticated and transported wildlife, altered landscapes and responded to environmental changes such as shifting temperatures and sea levels.Now, that story is available digitally through a new open-access data platform which links records of animals across biological and archaeological databases

Read More

Over 180 countries -not including the US– agree to restrict global plastic waste trade

May 11th, 2019

The governments of 187 countries have agreed to control the movement of plastic waste between national borders, in an effort to curb the world’s plastic crisis — but the United States was not among them.

Read More


Coastal Care junior
The World's Beaches
Sand Mining
One Percent