Sea Level Rise

Accelerated erosion

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There will always be beaches, but sea level rise will ensure that they will not be in the same place in the future. The beaches will still exist throughout this change, but many of the buildings may not. Efforts to save development, however do threaten beaches, such as shoreline armoring structures.

Although relative amounts of rise may seem very small, only a few millimeters per year, the cumulative effect of these small rises each year over a long period of time (100+ years) causes major problems. Accelerated rates of erosion are attributed to sea level rise and erosion causes large economic losses around the world each year due to the close proximity of buildings and critical infrastructure. This includes transportation systems, gas and oil lines as well as electricity lines and power plants.

Most developed coasts and beaches have buildings very close to the ocean leaving little room for the ever-expanding ocean. The future effects of sea level rise on coastal civilization over the entire world are of great concern. Over half of the world’s population lives within 100 km of the coast. Over the next 50 years, damage due to coastal development will be devastating, but if the rate of sea level rise increases, the results could be catastrophic. This issue threatens areas from New York City in the United States to the Pearl River Delta in China to the Maldives.

The world map below allows you to see elevations of coastal areas. Areas in red are the lowest in elevation and are most prone to flooding. Check out Manhattan in New York City. If you think the situation there looks dire, be sure to check out the effects of a 2 m rise in sea level on Pearl River Delta in China, home to more than 40 million people. Map courtesy of globalwarmingart.com


Surfing in / Sea Level Rise

Scientists warned of rising sea levels in NC. Republican lawmakers shelved their recommendations.

The state’s coastal plain, would not be in such grave danger if lawmakers had not rejected a study prepared by a panel of scientists and engineers, that predicted the sea level would rise 39 inches by 2100 because of climate change.

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North Carolina didn’t like science on sea levels, so passed a law against it

In 2012, the state whose low-lying coast lies in the path of Hurricane Florence reacted to a prediction of catastrophically rising seas by banning policies based on such forecasts.

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Would iconic Cape Hatteras Lighthouse be underwater now if it wasn’t moved 20 years ago?

When experts decided in 1999 that the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse had to be moved to survive, Dare County officials sued to stop the risky relocation. Next year marks the 20th anniversary of the colossal effort… has the encroaching Atlantic finally reached the spot where the lighthouse once stood?

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As waters rise, coastal megacities like Mumbai face catastrophe

Mumbai and other fast-growing coastal megacities in Asia are particularly vulnerable to climate-related flooding. Twenty-one of the world’s 31 megacities hug a coastline, 13 of which are in Asia. These cities of 10 million or more often drive their national economies and are home to both rich and poor.

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10 Beaches at risk of disappearing

All over the world, beaches are in peril. Globally, climate change has seen sea levels rise about 8 inches since 1880. If we don’t make some sort of drastic change in our lifestyles, levels are projected to go up another one to four feet by 2100. Here’s what that means for our beloved beaches: erosion, cliff disintegration, flooding, saltwater infiltrating freshwater, and possibly, complete destruction.

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Sea level rise is already eroding home values, unbeknownst to their owners

Three studies have found evidence that the threat of higher seas is also undermining coastal property values, as home buyers – particularly investors – begin the retreat to higher ground.

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When Salt Water Intrusion is Not Just a Threat But a Reality, Guyana

Guyanese farmers have been reporting salt water intrusion for a number of years.

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Why sea level rise varies from place to place

In the 20th century, ocean levels rose by a global average of about 14 centimeters, mainly due to melting ice and warming waters. Some coastal areas saw more sea level rise than others. Here’s why.

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Rising sea levels threatens coastal cities with more tsunamis, scientists warn

Tsunamis will become more common and more ferocious with global warming, scientists have warned after a study found that global sea level rises will increase the risk of coastal cities being wiped out.

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Recent / Sea Level Rise

Would iconic Cape Hatteras Lighthouse be underwater now if it wasn’t moved 20 years ago?

September 5th, 2018

When experts decided in 1999 that the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse had to be moved to survive, Dare County officials sued to stop the risky relocation. Next year marks the 20th anniversary of the colossal effort… has the encroaching Atlantic finally reached the spot where the lighthouse once stood?

Read More

As waters rise, coastal megacities like Mumbai face catastrophe

September 3rd, 2018

Mumbai and other fast-growing coastal megacities in Asia are particularly vulnerable to climate-related flooding. Twenty-one of the world’s 31 megacities hug a coastline, 13 of which are in Asia. These cities of 10 million or more often drive their national economies and are home to both rich and poor.

Read More

10 Beaches at risk of disappearing

August 27th, 2018

All over the world, beaches are in peril. Globally, climate change has seen sea levels rise about 8 inches since 1880. If we don’t make some sort of drastic change in our lifestyles, levels are projected to go up another one to four feet by 2100. Here’s what that means for our beloved beaches: erosion, cliff disintegration, flooding, saltwater infiltrating freshwater, and possibly, complete destruction.

Read More

Sea level rise is already eroding home values, unbeknownst to their owners

August 21st, 2018

Three studies have found evidence that the threat of higher seas is also undermining coastal property values, as home buyers – particularly investors – begin the retreat to higher ground.

Read More

When Salt Water Intrusion is Not Just a Threat But a Reality, Guyana

August 18th, 2018

Guyanese farmers have been reporting salt water intrusion for a number of years.

Read More

Why sea level rise varies from place to place

August 16th, 2018

In the 20th century, ocean levels rose by a global average of about 14 centimeters, mainly due to melting ice and warming waters. Some coastal areas saw more sea level rise than others. Here’s why.

Read More

Rising sea levels threatens coastal cities with more tsunamis, scientists warn

August 16th, 2018

Tsunamis will become more common and more ferocious with global warming, scientists have warned after a study found that global sea level rises will increase the risk of coastal cities being wiped out.

Read More

Cost of Coastal Flooding in Europe Could Reach $1 Trillion Annually by 2100

August 14th, 2018

Without additional climate change adaptation measures, the annual cost of damage from coastal flooding in Europe could jump from $1.4 billion today to as much as $1 trillion by the end of the century due largely to rising sea levels according to new study.

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“A place in crisis”: Author documents life on disappearing Tangier Island

August 12th, 2018

Tangier Island, which is home to about 450 people, is slowly disappearing due to sea level change and shoreline erosion.

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Sea level rise has already sunk Carolinas beach property values — by $1.6 billion, study finds

July 30th, 2018

Sea levels are rising and the southeast has already lost billions in property value, a recent study shows. Scientists have found $7.4 billion was lost in home values across North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia and Florida because of sea level rise flooding from 2005 to 2017.

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