Exploring links between Ocean Warming, Stronger Hurricanes and low-lying coastal zones

Exploring links between Ocean Warming, Stronger Hurricanes and low-lying coastal zones

Hurricane
Photo Source: NASA / GSFC.
Hurricanes are giant, spiraling tropical storms that can pack wind speeds of over 160 miles (257 kilometers) an hour and unleash more than 2.4 trillion gallons (9 trillion liters) of rain a day. These same tropical storms are known as cyclones in the northern Indian Ocean and Bay of Bengal, and as typhoons in the western Pacific Ocean.

Excerpts;

In an interview with Yale Environment, MIT meteorologist discusses current thinking on how higher sea surface temperatures are likely to lead to stronger hurricanes, thus believing subsidies and bailouts encouraging people to live in vulnerable, low-lying coastal zones are folly…

Read Full Article, Yale Environment 360

Coastal Care

Related Posts

Fixed for Failure: How flood insurance keeps dangerous homes standing in SC

Fixed for Failure: How flood insurance keeps dangerous homes standing in SC

Connecting coastal processes with global systems

Connecting coastal processes with global systems

Editorial: Oppose barrier island development, South Carolina

Editorial: Oppose barrier island development, South Carolina

Research shows how park-like tsunami defenses can provide a sustainable alternative to towering seawalls

Research shows how park-like tsunami defenses can provide a sustainable alternative to towering seawalls

SAF Video

Beach of the Month

Photo of the Month

Plastic Pollution

Sand Wars – United Nations-GEA

Sand Mining Detrimental Effects

The World’s Beaches

Coastal Care Junior

NASA – Fly along with NASA’s fleet of Earth science missions and observe Earth from a global perspective in an immersive, 3-D environment.