Japan Revives a Sea Barrier That Failed to Hold

Japan Revives a Sea Barrier That Failed to Hold

breakwater
Breakwater. Photo source: ©© Jadwinia

Excerpts; The New York Times

After three decades and nearly $1.6 billion, work on Kamaishi’s great tsunami breakwater was completed three years ago. A mile long, 207 feet deep and jutting nearly 20 feet above the water, the quake-resistant structure made it into the Guinness World Records last year and rekindled fading hopes of revival in this rusting former steel town.

But when a giant tsunami hit Japan’s northeast on March 11, the breakwater largely crumpled under the first 30-foot-high wave, leaving Kamaishi defenseless. Waves deflected from the breakwater are also strongly suspected of having contributed to the 60-foot waves that engulfed communities north of it…

Read Full Article, The New York Times

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